Tag Archives: success

Hiring For Culture In Marketing And Sales

Hiring for culture and/or personality is often times even more important than hiring for hard skills.

This can be more challenging than hiring for hard skills as hard skills are often easier to test and screen for.

Culture and personality can be multifaceted and more difficult to screen individuals for.

But there are certain strategies and steps that can be taken to give you a competitive edge.

You want to hire the right types of people and personalities to blend in well with the culture of your company and employees.

It’s critical that you hire people correctly from a cultural perspective for many reasons such as employee longevity.

Employees will not stay long with a company that they don’t feel is a match for their personality.

They will regularly feel out of place or will be unhappy and you’ll soon notice a high level of turnover in your organization.

Happy employees are productive employees!

One of the ways to make sure both new and existing employees are happy is to make sure that you hire along certain cultural lines.

WHY DEFINE YOUR CULTURE?

If you’re interested in hiring for culture you must have a defined culture for your company.

The first big mistake that many companies make is not having their culture clear and defined.

They attempt to hire for culture without actually having a well defined culture!

This seems obvious, but it’s not.

If you try to hire for culture without a well-defined culture, good luck!

Without a well defined culture you will have no guiding principles to use in order to steer you in screening people.

You should have something concrete to show potential candidates to give them the insight to know if they’re a fit for the role.

If your company occurs like it doesn’t really have a culture, this can be just as detrimental as having a negative culture.

Typically, a negative culture is the fallout of not having a well-defined culture.

This in turn can end up with a mix of different personalities which tends to go in a default negative direction.

DEFINING YOUR COMPANY CULTURE

You can involve other key executives, and even your current employees, depending on the size of your company.

It will be important that you create not only the external brand for your company, but also an employer brand.

This should be outlined in a document and there should be structures in place to engender, grow, reward and nurture this culture.

It’s a good idea to have certain employees be brand ambassadors to engender and nurture the brand across the company.

You can create different contests and all kinds of interesting things to ensure you have a robust culture.

This is a topic that we will cover in future blogs in further detail.

But this is the first step – if you are interested in hiring for culture you’ve got to have a culture!

DOCUMENTING YOUR CULTURE

Again, it’s important that this be written down somewhere and explicated in a very clear and concise manner.

You will want to use this document as part of your hiring process.

Prospective employees should be able to read and see the document which outlines the expectations around culture.

Prospective employees should be clear about what your company culture is, what it stands for, and what the expectations are.

They should be able to meet with as many team members as possible to get an in person feel for the culture.

It is critical for prospective employees to be able to do their own due diligence.

You want them to be able to determine if your company and the position are going to be a good fit for them.

Many times prospective employees won’t do enough due diligence in determining if a company is a good fit for them.

This is something that often leads to making a bad hire.

It’s not the employer’s fault if the employee has not done enough research to see if the company is a good fit.

You want to hedge this for yourself and expose a potential employee to your company culture as much as possible.

Then there will be no surprises for them when they show up on day one.

TOOLS FOR ENSURING CULTURAL FIT

This is something you want to check on multiple times throughout your interview process.

This will truly ensure that you have a good match both for yourself and for the candidate.

Another major tool that employers use are personality assessment tests.

Things like the disk assessment test and many other companies who offer similar products and services.

Some personality tests are extremely in-depth, some are just surface level and there is everything in between.

Personality tests can be a good tool to get a general gage if someone will fit into your company culture.

Ultimately you have to take these tests with a grain of salt as they aren’t perfect and can be more or less accurate depending on many factors.

We’ve had some clients in the past that rely heavily on these tests and use the results extremely heavily.

It’s important not to go overboard with using these tests as a determining factor for hiring somebody or not.

At the end of the day it will be important to see how these tests fit in with your company culture as a whole.

STAYING DIVERSE

Another important factor in hiring for culture is not getting pigeonholed into hiring only the same kinds of personalities.

You want to have dissenting voices and people who are going to interrupt the status quo.

To continue to stay relevant in a fast growing, fast moving industry, you want to be diverse with your hires.

When everybody’s always on the same page and agrees with each other all the time, things can become stale.

Without new ideas you’ll fall to the wayside with some of the more fast thinking companies out in the market.

We recommend that part of a company’s culture be about open communication, new ideas and transparency.

As long as that is part of your culture then you can always hire and look for those types of traits.

IN CONCLUSION

In conclusion hiring for culture is extremely important!

Bad culture and personality hires are one of the number one contributors to high turnover rates.

It’s worth it to do the work to define your company culture and then use it as a guideline to hire the right people.

You will give yourself a major advantage to retaining solid employees and producing great services and products in the marketplace.


Here are some great ways to get started in building your company culture: https://bit.ly/2slTkkZ

Negotiating Salary For Employers And Jobseekers

Two hands shaking over a pen and contract - Salary Negotiation

TIPS FOR NEGOTIATING SALARY 

Today we’re sharing tips for both employers and jobseekers who are considering accepting or negotiating a salary offer.

You should know there are different strategies to take depending on your situation for both employers and jobseekers.

Your strategy depends on if you are negotiating with each other directly or if there is a recruiter who is negotiating on your behalf.

WORKING WITH A RECRUITER

If there is a recruiter in the mix, you need to be clear about how much you trust them to represent and negotiate for both parties.

There are a lot of different recruiters out there and many of them are good at negotiating and many aren’t.

If you’re working with someone, you want to be sure you can trust that they are going to be able to handle both parties interests.

FOR THE JOBSEEKER

If you’re a job seeker and working with a recruiter, you definitely want to take whatever advice that recruiter is giving you.

The recruiter is likely going to have your best interest in mind and do everything they can to negotiate the highest salary possible.

Recruiters’ commissions are going to be based off of your final salary, so it really is in their best interest to negotiate the best possible salary.

The thing to keep in mind is that often by the time you get an offer, the recruiter will have already done some significant negotiating on your end.

Although it may be the first time you’re seeing an offer, it’s likely not the first time that potential employer has been in the negotiation process.

So you want to keep the above in mind as you don’t want to be in a position to over negotiate.

BEING CLEAR, CONCISE AND PREPARED

The last thing that you want to do is go back-and-forth with your prospective employer too many times.

This can make you seem nit-picky and could just annoy and or upset at the situation.

One way to avoid this is when you do an initial review of your offer be sure that you collect any and all questions that you have.

Many jobseekers make the mistake of going back and forth finding concerns and asking questions.

This can get annoying and makes you seem unorganized.

COMMUNICATING SALARY EXPECTATIONS

When working with a recruiter, it’s also in your best interest to be upfront about your current salary.

Many states are now employing laws which make it illegal for recruiters or companies to ask candidates what your current salary is.

The purpose of these laws is to avoid gender discrimination, not so that people can hide their salary and try to get more money.

It will be obvious to the recruiter if you do this.

The truth of the matter is that nine time out of ten, being upfront about your current salary is your best ammunition.

If you’re being underpaid, you can use that as an argument for why you want an increase.

If you aren’t being underpaid you can use your current salary as a basis for a certain percentage of increase.

In other words, it’s better to have a stand off point in your argument for certain salary expectations.

You don’t want to have a certain salary expectation based off of nothing.

Most of the time this is going to help, especially if you are working with a recruiter.

A recruiter will be able to take that information and really frame it with their client to really sell you with your requested salary.

WHAT JOBSEEKERS CAN EXPECT

Also, be sure that you don’t get offended if your first number on the offer is a bit off.

Many companies tend to come in with a lowball offer at first.

This is fairly normal and you want to make sure that you don’t take something like this personally.

This can be a red flag in some situations, but normally it’s just a starting off point knowing that there’s going to be some back-and-forth.

Be professional about it and remind them what your expectations are and what your current salary is.

You can also remind them of your justifications and your logical case for the salary that you are expecting.

The more evidence and logic you’re able to bring to the situation about your salary expectation, the better.

SALARY IS NOT EVERYTHING

You want to make sure you get a clear picture of all the benefits that come with the role you’re negotiating for.

Things like bonuses, health insurance, life insurance, 401(k) and disability should all be considered.

There are many other perks that companies are now instituting like food perks, dry cleaning, vacation, paid days off, remote days, short days in the summer, and the list goes on.

Many of these bonuses, benefits and perks are difficult to monetize, but add up to a lot of money within any given year.

It’s very important that you keep all of this in mind as these things can have a major impact on your overall compensation.

These things also greatly impact the quality of your work and life balance.

So it’s very important that you take it all in a consideration and don’t get too stuck on a salary number.

We’ve seen many candidates get stuck on a salary number and miss out on a great opportunity.

You want to be sure you’re taking the whole picture into account.

FOR THE EMPLOYERS

It’s important that you avoid the aforementioned initial lowball offer.

Be up front with people and let them know what your ranges are early on in the process.

Get expectations from people early on in the process.

You can ask questions as to why they are expecting a certain salary.

Be sure yon’t break the law in your state if you’re not allowed to ask about their current salary.

HAVING A SALARY AND BENEFITS PACKAGE

Have a really well thought-out and put-together benefits document showing as much as possible.

This will show the details of the monetary amount of your benefits package.

A well put together benefits package is really going to help supplement any salary offer that you make.

You’ll be able to justify a lower salary or market salary with candidates if you are also offering a competitive benefits package.

It’s important that you are clear with people throughout the process and you make sure they are clear with you about expectations.

You don’t want to waste your time getting all the way through your interview process with someone that you like, only to have a deal fall apart.

This can happen if you don’t communicate clearly and aren’t in the same ballpark when it comes to compensation.

It’s also not a good idea to come in with your first number as your maximum, unless of course this has been discussed with the candidate beforehand.

Most candidates are expecting to be able to negotiate or pushback on the salary at least once and get a little bit higher than the initial offer.

There is a very important emotional and psychological aspect of people accepting offers.

No one likes to just lay down and accept the first offer.

People want to feel like they pushed back and then someone gave in because they really like them.

The last thing you want is for someone to feel OK about accepting the offer and then to show up on day one feeling just OK having accepted the job.

You want people excited about the role and to feel wanted.

CONCLUSION

These are just a few tips you can take into consideration.

The tips in this blog can go a long way to getting the best offer for yourself and also for the company.


How do you do it ALL? Here is a great list on managing your work-life balance! https://muse.cm/SyV3yC

Hiring Remote, Partial Remote, and Telecommute Workers

Laptop, mobile phone and coffee cup laying on table with a window view of outside - representing working remotely

Today we’re talking about the pros and cons of hiring remote workers or employing remote or telecommute workers.

It’s important to keep in mind that all businesses are different and this may not work for everyone.

Some businesses are prone to work very well with remote workers while others are not designed to have remote teams.

It’s important to pay attention to this because if your business is a good candidate for remote workers, you can greatly benefit.

If your business is not conducive to hiring remote workers this article may not be relevant to you.

If you want to consider this, you’ll need to see what changes you can make to take advantage of remote workers.

REMOTE WORKERS ARE TRENDING

There is currently a large trend for candidates that are interested in the ability to work remote or partially remote.

Many people nowadays are putting much more emphasis on their work-life balance.

Being able to work remote offers people the flexibility to have their work-life schedule be more balanced.

Many people also work better remote then they do in an office environment.

The office environment can often have many distractions with other coworkers or other things going on.

This of course depends on your office culture, office environment and the type of people that you hire.

Many extremely talented people who are at the top of their field are only interested in working with this flexibility.

THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN HIRING REMOTE

Being open to hiring remote workers opens you up to a segment of the market that you may be missing out on.

If you are thinking of hiring remote workers, you have to consider how that will fit into your existing culture.

If your existing culture is one where everyone is in the office and then you hire someone remote, this could cause friction.

You could produce dissension in the ranks of your employees who might feel left out or jealous if the new person gets to work remote but they don’t.

TRANSITIONING TO HAVING REMOTE WORKERS

If you’re considering taking this on, you want to take inventory on whether your current employees can work remote.

Perhaps you make working remote more like a benefit to be attained if someone reaches certain KPI’s or metrics.

Many sales people are extremely effective working remote.

WHICH POSITIONS WORK BEST REMOTELY

If someone travels a lot and they’re mostly on site with clients, there really is no need to have them in office.

 You can benefit greatly from a rockstar sales person being somewhere else in the country.

Customer service folks and account management people also function very well in a remote capacity.

Believe it or not, accounting folks and financial people can also work very well remote.

You might want to think about having your internal financial people working remote as well.

WHO IS THE RIGHT FIT FOR REMOTE WORK

When hiring remote you should know if they are the kind of personality that’s productive in a remote function.

There are many people who if left to their own devices will not get the work done that needs to get done.

If you have those kind of people working remote you will see a slump in productivity.

Your people should know that their ability to work remote goes hand-in-hand with the results they are on the hook to produce.

In other words working remote should be slated more like a privilege or a benefit that is earned rather than a “right.”

Another trick to hiring a solid remote employee is hiring someone who has been successful working remote in the past.

THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS

There’s also incorporate partial telecommuting where your team is in the office 3-4 days and remote 1-2 days a week.

This model can provide the best of both worlds for you and your employees.

Then you can accomplish the things you need with the team together and have the balance of working remote some days.

This is a very common model that’s being adopted by many companies and is being extremely successful.

This model works if all of your employees are local as you’ll need them in the office together certain days of the week.

RECRUITING REMOTE WORKERS

If you are going to go after remote workers it may be challenging from a recruiting perspective.

Recruiting firms like us are extremely solid resources for being able to tap into other markets for remote work.

Remember, the challenge will be instead of just recruiting in your city you’re going to be recruiting nationwide.

You may even be just recruiting in certain times zones.

Your pool of people to reach out to is going to increase dramatically.

You will need to have a strategy for how to tap into those markets and find the best talent.

Keep in mind that it will likely take a lot of volume, so leaning on a recruiter can be a very valuable resource for tapping into that market.

CONCLUSION

Look at remote and telecommute working as a way to tap into a segment of the market with more great talent.

This is a segment of the market that is growing as more and more people are looking for that work-life balance.

More and more people are looking for the ability to have flexibility around their work schedules.

Many of these types of people can be extremely high producers and will produce better with this type of flexibility.

As managers it’s important for us to focus on hiring the right personalities that can work well autonomously.

This can be more productive for managers also, not having to control and micromanage everybody.

You owe it to yourself to explore this a bit further and see if it’s something that can work for your business.


Here are some great tools for increasing your team’s productivity:

https://bit.ly/2Aj4qrY


 

Recruiting Marketing and Sales Candidates in Seattle

Sunset over the city of Seattle, Washington
RECRUITING IN SEATTLE

Today’s post is about recruiting Marketing, Media, PR and Sales professionals in the Seattle market.

Seattle is currently a fast growing market, especially in the technology space.

Many people think that Seattle is going to be the next Silicon Valley with a lot of technology based companies being started.

We may also see established companies moving and opening up offices in the Seattle area.

A TOUGH MARKET TO FILL

Seattle has challenges from a recruiting perspective and often times will require additional help.

Companies may either use internal recruiting efforts or hire outside firms.

It’s important to know when you need to get extra help for finding specific talent.

The need for talent is extremely high as the market expands and therefore is becoming very competitive.

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION

In order to compete there are certain things that you can do from a recruiting perspective.

Seattle is a great market to offer relocation in the Pacific Northwest and is even attractive from the Midwest.

It is an attractive city and many people, especially the millennial generation, are interested in moving to a city like Seattle.

Seattle offers a lot of outdoor recreation as well as career growth.

It is a smaller market and recruiting only within Seattle can be challenging.

This is another reason to be open to hiring and relocating candidates from other parts of the country.

Portland is a great market to poach people from, as well as Southern California.

The Bay area, Los Angeles, Orange County and San Diego are all great markets to pull talent from, as well as Denver and Chicago.

HIRING REMOTE

If you’re not able to relocate people it’s a good idea to be open to remote workers.

Tapping into the remote work force is great for any company, especially those in smaller markets like Seattle.

Another challenge in Seattle can be the commute due to the geography and traffic in the city.

An already small market can be dropped even further depending on where your company is located and where your talent is located.

This is again another reason to be open to remote or partial remote workers.

If you’re able to find local talent that is partial remote you’re more likely to find folks who would otherwise not be interested.

DEFINE YOUR CULTURE

It’s important to differentiate yourself from your competition.

Your company should have a defined culture with structures and processes put in place that engender the growth of that company. 

You want to be able to communicate that culture and appeal to prospective employees.

Having a strong employer brand is critical now more than ever for attracting the right talent.

Offering benefits like parking passes or other perks will also make it easier for local talent to get to your location.

IN CONCLUSION

Seattle is an excellent market to be in right now.

It’s attracting a lot of talented individuals that you will be able to tap into for your business.

At the same time, more companies are moving to the area and this means more potential competitors for you and your business.

Some of these things can increase your costs, but at the end of the day should also increase your bottom line.

These factors can give you a fighting chance to beating out your competition.

Being open to remote workers and relocating people to your company greatly gives you an advantage for finding good talent.

It’s important to take the necessary steps to have your business compete and your employer brand be one that differentiates you from your competitors.

At the end of the day your employees are what make up your company and it’s critical that you do everything you can to hire and attract the best talent.


Seattle is trending as the decade’s fastest growing city in the US.

Read about it here: https://bit.ly/2km1hSB