Tag Archives: employers

What Is A Corporate Recruiter?

A corporate recruiter is best defined in relationship to an executive recruiter or even a staffing recruiter.

Corporate recruiters exist in house at a corporation regardless of the size of the corporation.

A corporate recruiter could also be called an in-house recruiter and typically exists on an HR team.

Sometimes they’re also on a more distinct department of an HR team known as talent acquisition.

A corporate recruiter’s job is similar to an executive recruiter or a staffing recruiter and is to recruit candidates.

THE DIFFERENCE WITH CORPORATE RECRUITERS

Corporate recruiters are likely focusing on specific roles that tend to have a wide variety of roles and experience.

These roles could be in logistics, marketing, sales, entry-level, senior level or executive level roles and so on.

Often times senior-level roles are reserved for more senior recruiters.

These types of roles, which typically start at the director level or above, require a different type of experience and expertise.

A corporate recruiter often is also focused on hiring for one company only.

An executive or staffing recruiter is going to be working with a variety of clients and locations, often nationwide and sometimes globally.

One thing that’s important to keep in mind with corporate recruiters is that they are always going to be solely focused on recruiting.

All they’re going to be doing is recruiting and managing the full recruiting lifecycle.

*For more information about what the full recruiting lifecycle is, or what a full cycle recruiter is, please refer to an earlier blog HERE.

OTHER RECRUITERS

An executive or agency recruiter is going to be focused on recruiting for multiple companies and levels and probably not solely recruiting.

Agency recruiters are almost always doing some level of sales and/or client services.

Since agency recruiters are also vendors, they will also be constantly managing client relationships, up selling, opening and growing accounts.

This is a unique sales function that is particular to agency recruiters that a corporate recruiter is never going to deal with.

Agency recruiters are typically going to be held to a higher standard as they need to pay more attention to quality versus quantity.

Internal corporate recruiters don’t have to prove themselves as much as an outside recruiter.

Typically corporate recruiters get paid a lot more money than agency recruiters since they’re on salary with some bonuses and commissions.

A corporate recruiter is part of HR, while an agency, executive or staffing recruiter is more of a sales person who is also a recruiter.

ADVANTAGES OF CORPORATE RECRUITERS

One thing to know is that corporate recruiters tend to have an advantage and a better grasp on culture within a company.

Since they’re in house with the company, they have day-to-day interactions with the culture and other employees of the company.

They’re often involved in other conversations with HR about staff augmentation, company structure and strategy.

They will have an insight into things that the agency recruiters are just never going to be privy to.

This can be an advantage as hiring for culture is becoming more and more important across organizations.

Being able to find people that are the right cultural fit for the long term is critical for anyone dealing with talent acquisition.

WHERE OTHERS RECRUITERS FALL SHORT

This is where most executive recruiters or agency recruiters drop the ball.

They don’t do the legwork to find out about their clients culture and their clients needs.

And they don’t stay in touch and communicate with their clients in ways that keep them connected.

They in turn tend to find people that may or may not be the best cultural fit.

Often times this is why there is such an industry wide fall off ratio for agency recruiters.

If you are going to hire a recruiter you want the advantage of being connected with your company culture.

If you’re an agency recruiter it’s critical that you take the extra steps necessary to be able to do that.

Corporate recruiters are often times going to be very invested in their company given that they work there.

So this can sometimes lead to another competitive advantage in terms of finding the right talent.

RETAINED VS. CONTINGENCY RECRUITERS

This is why most of the time retained recruiting agencies are wildly more effective than contingency.

Often companies don’t want to pay engagement fees, but don’t realize the fees are guaranteeing much better results.

For example, here at Aldebaran, we have a 95% close rate on our VIP retained searches while our contingency searches rate is closer to 60%.

This is a very large discrepancy, but that’s because retained searches get prioritized and have permanent VIP status.

A contingency search isn’t going to have permanent VIP status.

When contingency searches don’t produce results in 3-4 weeks they lose priority as other needs come in through the business.

It becomes less and less profitable for a recruiting firm to spend too much time on contingency searches.

If you find a good recruiter and pay the engagement fees, you’ll get sometimes up to 50% increase in effectiveness!

CORPORATE OVERLOAD

A corporate recruiter is likely going to be able to spend unlimited resources on any given position until it’s filled.

This is an advantage, but the potential problem is that roles tend to stack up.

At many organizations, corporate recruiters are overloaded and unable to focus on the needs of the organization. 

Agency recruiters tend to be more experienced and better head hunters than corporate recruiters.

This is simply because of their exposure to different markets, clients, and different types of opportunities.

Agency recruiters tend to have a better understanding of business and how different companies work together.

A good agency recruiter is going to be able to be an asset to you and your talent acquisition team.

If you find and hire a good external recruiter, make sure that you’re leaning on and leveraging them for advice.

They are exposed to a lot and can give you a lot of insight into different aspects and strategies in the market.

So these are some of the differences between corporate recruiters and agency recruiters.

There are many more, but this is an initial look at the differences in the types of recruiters out there. 


Here are more things to consider when thinking of hiring a recruiter: https://bit.ly/2C5Ot9C


Have questions or want to find out about working with us? Let’s chat! https://aldebaranrecruiting.com/looking-for-talent/

Hiring For Culture In Marketing And Sales

Hiring for culture and/or personality is often times even more important than hiring for hard skills.

This can be more challenging than hiring for hard skills as hard skills are often easier to test and screen for.

Culture and personality can be multifaceted and more difficult to screen individuals for.

But there are certain strategies and steps that can be taken to give you a competitive edge.

You want to hire the right types of people and personalities to blend in well with the culture of your company and employees.

It’s critical that you hire people correctly from a cultural perspective for many reasons such as employee longevity.

Employees will not stay long with a company that they don’t feel is a match for their personality.

They will regularly feel out of place or will be unhappy and you’ll soon notice a high level of turnover in your organization.

Happy employees are productive employees!

One of the ways to make sure both new and existing employees are happy is to make sure that you hire along certain cultural lines.

WHY DEFINE YOUR CULTURE?

If you’re interested in hiring for culture you must have a defined culture for your company.

The first big mistake that many companies make is not having their culture clear and defined.

They attempt to hire for culture without actually having a well defined culture!

This seems obvious, but it’s not.

If you try to hire for culture without a well-defined culture, good luck!

Without a well defined culture you will have no guiding principles to use in order to steer you in screening people.

You should have something concrete to show potential candidates to give them the insight to know if they’re a fit for the role.

If your company occurs like it doesn’t really have a culture, this can be just as detrimental as having a negative culture.

Typically, a negative culture is the fallout of not having a well-defined culture.

This in turn can end up with a mix of different personalities which tends to go in a default negative direction.

DEFINING YOUR COMPANY CULTURE

You can involve other key executives, and even your current employees, depending on the size of your company.

It will be important that you create not only the external brand for your company, but also an employer brand.

This should be outlined in a document and there should be structures in place to engender, grow, reward and nurture this culture.

It’s a good idea to have certain employees be brand ambassadors to engender and nurture the brand across the company.

You can create different contests and all kinds of interesting things to ensure you have a robust culture.

This is a topic that we will cover in future blogs in further detail.

But this is the first step – if you are interested in hiring for culture you’ve got to have a culture!

DOCUMENTING YOUR CULTURE

Again, it’s important that this be written down somewhere and explicated in a very clear and concise manner.

You will want to use this document as part of your hiring process.

Prospective employees should be able to read and see the document which outlines the expectations around culture.

Prospective employees should be clear about what your company culture is, what it stands for, and what the expectations are.

They should be able to meet with as many team members as possible to get an in person feel for the culture.

It is critical for prospective employees to be able to do their own due diligence.

You want them to be able to determine if your company and the position are going to be a good fit for them.

Many times prospective employees won’t do enough due diligence in determining if a company is a good fit for them.

This is something that often leads to making a bad hire.

It’s not the employer’s fault if the employee has not done enough research to see if the company is a good fit.

You want to hedge this for yourself and expose a potential employee to your company culture as much as possible.

Then there will be no surprises for them when they show up on day one.

TOOLS FOR ENSURING CULTURAL FIT

This is something you want to check on multiple times throughout your interview process.

This will truly ensure that you have a good match both for yourself and for the candidate.

Another major tool that employers use are personality assessment tests.

Things like the disk assessment test and many other companies who offer similar products and services.

Some personality tests are extremely in-depth, some are just surface level and there is everything in between.

Personality tests can be a good tool to get a general gage if someone will fit into your company culture.

Ultimately you have to take these tests with a grain of salt as they aren’t perfect and can be more or less accurate depending on many factors.

We’ve had some clients in the past that rely heavily on these tests and use the results extremely heavily.

It’s important not to go overboard with using these tests as a determining factor for hiring somebody or not.

At the end of the day it will be important to see how these tests fit in with your company culture as a whole.

STAYING DIVERSE

Another important factor in hiring for culture is not getting pigeonholed into hiring only the same kinds of personalities.

You want to have dissenting voices and people who are going to interrupt the status quo.

To continue to stay relevant in a fast growing, fast moving industry, you want to be diverse with your hires.

When everybody’s always on the same page and agrees with each other all the time, things can become stale.

Without new ideas you’ll fall to the wayside with some of the more fast thinking companies out in the market.

We recommend that part of a company’s culture be about open communication, new ideas and transparency.

As long as that is part of your culture then you can always hire and look for those types of traits.

IN CONCLUSION

In conclusion hiring for culture is extremely important!

Bad culture and personality hires are one of the number one contributors to high turnover rates.

It’s worth it to do the work to define your company culture and then use it as a guideline to hire the right people.

You will give yourself a major advantage to retaining solid employees and producing great services and products in the marketplace.


Here are some great ways to get started in building your company culture: https://bit.ly/2slTkkZ

Hiring Digital Marketing Professionals

This is a blog with tips for hiring marketing and digital marketing professionals for your team.

Marketing is an essential function in any organization.

In today’s digital landscape having a strength for digital and your marketing strategy is more important than ever.

The landscape for hiring digital folks can become daunting or even potentially overwhelming.

There are a lot of types of marketing people out there and it can be difficult to hone in on the right person for your team.

FINDING THE RIGHT PEOPLE IN THE RIGHT MARKETING SEATS

Having the right marketing people in your organization can make or break your opportunity of increasing your marketshare for your service or product.

It’s important to have a solid strategy for hiring marketing people.

This is true whether you have a backfill, a replacement that you need to fill or are hiring a new marketing role within your organization.

PAINTING A CLEAR PICTURE OF YOUR NEED

The first critical step is to make sure that you have a clear picture of the organizational structure of your marketing team.

You want to have a solid organizational structure built out for your entire company.

This way it’s very clear how your marketing team will interact with all the other teams.

If you’ve got someone who has hired marketing people before on your team, this gives you an advantage to lean on this person’s experience a bit.

QUESTIONS TO HELP YOU GET CLEAR ON THE ROLE

It’s important when you’re looking at filling this role to get very clear on what the position will be.

Is it going to focus on a particular market segment?

Or is it more of a general list type role?

Will it be focusing on a specific marketing channel?

Or will it be more of a multi channel marketing role?

You want to have a target market, demographic and geographic region flushed out for your company.

This will help to inform you what you need from a marketing perspective.

DRIVE FOR CONTENT OR DESIGN AND CREATIVE 

Marketing can also go in other directions which are more creative or brand oriented.

Do you need somebody who is content driven or has a strength for design and creative?

If so, this can take you in a different direction as well.

The important part is to get really clear on what the important functions are that you need this person to have.

Are you requiring someone to check multiple boxes and is finding someone like that is realistic?

DETERMINING WHETHER THE NEED IS FOR ONE OR TWO ROLES

You may find that you need two marketing people, depending on the different functions they need to have.

If you have other marketing people on your team then it’s important to see how this person will fit in with those different functions.

Having a well rounded marketing team and strategy is critical and you likely will need more than just one person.

CONSIDERING THE AUDIENCE

Once you get clear about what type of a marketing person you need something else to keep in mind is audience.

Will their experience in this area be important to the audience this role is marketing to?

Do you need somebody with consumer experience?

Or somebody with more B2B experience?

Or maybe doesn’t matter?

WHAT ABOUT YOUR INDUSTRY OR VERTICAL?

The other thing to look at is the industry or vertical you’re in.

Is your industry very niche, which requires someone who understands your product, service and industry to market it effectively?

Often times this is the case, but not always.

Many times industry and vertical experience is translatable. 

Sometimes this is even better than having somebody from the same industry as you get some fresh thinking and perspective.

CREATING A CLEAR JOB DESCRIPTION

It will be important for you to put together a clear job description of the position and a description of the right candidate.

For any job description it’s important that you are addressing both areas.

These include what the required skills are and what the actual job will look like on a day-to-day basis.

Having a solid job description is going to go a long way in attracting the right kind of candidates.

A job description that does not accurately describe what you want can be extremely detrimental.

A poor job description can cause potential candidates to pass right over it because they think it isn’t a fit for them.

It’s important to list your ‘must have’ requirements and your ‘nice to have’ requirements.

Too many must have requirements is going to narrow your pool down too much.

It’s important right off the bat to be clear about what you must have and what would be nice to have.

SPECIFYING THE NEEDED SKILLS FOR THE ROLE

Next, it’s very important to flush out what you need from a soft skills perspective.

We recommend putting the types of soft skills needed on your job description as well what kind of personality traits, cultural traits, etc. you need.

This is good for people to see and will help in the interview process.

This will allow you to structure your interviews in a way that screens people for hard skills as well as for soft skills.

TESTING CANDIDATES’ HARD AND SOFT SKILLS

Lastly, if your position requires some type of technical proficiency, it’s good to find a way to test potential candidates ability to do the job.

This can include things like working with an email automation platform, with some type of CRM system, or even a creative/design/content aspect.

That might mean seeing sample work or having them write up some simple copy or content as an example.

You might need presentation skills, so perhaps having them do a simple presentation.

It might be a technical test with specific questions about using an automation software or CRM software or some other sort of software.

The bottom line is you want to test a candidates skills so you get an idea of what the person will be like when they’re in the seat.

TIME TO GET RECRUITING

Once you have a clear description and a picture of both the hard and soft skills, you can then get to recruiting.

Posting on job boards and on LinkedIn is going to be useful to some degree.

You’ll need to find a way to have a proactive headhunting strategy to go out and find the really solid people who aren’t looking for a job.

You need to find a way to find the people who are never going to find you on their own.

Nine out of ten candidates we place for our clients are coming from what’s known as the passive talent pool.

Again, the people that are not necessarily looking for a job.

This is where you will find the best talent.

You can’t trust nowadays that the right talent will just come to you – you have to go out and find them.

IN CONCLUSION

If you take all of this into account it will make a big difference in your being able to hire the right marketing people for your team.

Often a bad hire is not that the candidate wasn’t right for the job, but because the employer did not adequately flush out their need.

Take the time to get clear on your need, create a clear description and find that passive talent to recruit for your team.


Here are just some skills you can consider for your next digital marketing role:

https://bit.ly/2nVptgv

Interview Questions and Tips For Employers

Checklist of interview questions for Employer

Today we’re sharing interview tips for employers so that you can hone in on hiring the right candidates. 

We’ll also share some of the best interview questions to ask potential candidates.

We often hear from clients that it’s difficult to ensure they’re interviewing the right people with the right skillsets.

This can be even more challenging when a role has increasing levels of technical skills and requirements needed.

THINGS TO CONSIDER 

It can be easier to tell if somebody is a good cultural fit if you can have them interview with your team members.

You can tell if they would fit in with the culture or have the right personality if they do well with your team members.

It’s often difficult to determine if someone has the right skillset to be able to execute in the manner that you need.

We’ve heard many horror stories about candidates that interviewed really well, but weren’t a good fit.

Candidates can sell themselves and seem like they can do the job, when actually they don’t have what it takes.

However, when they start and get in the seat, it becomes clear that they are not the right fit.

Often they actually don’t have the skills or the experience needed to execute the job.

FINDING THE RIGHT CULTURAL FIT

Making a bad hire is a nightmare scenario for many companies and it’s a major waste of money and time.

It’s important that your process includes the right questions and steps needed to weed out the right hires.

READING AND SIFTING THROUGH RESUMES 

It all starts with making sure you have a good strategy for reviewing resumes.

Resumes come in many different forms and it’s important that not too much weight is put on them.

There’s likely a whole lot of someone’s experience that may not be on a resume.

Be careful not to lose out on people that could be good because you’re judging a book by its cover.

THE INTERVIEW STAGE

Once you get to the interview stage there are a lot of different strategies you can take.

This really depends on the type of role that you’re looking to fill.

ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS

You want to have some general questions that are open ended or generic questions.

You never want to lead to witness.

Don’t want to ask questions like, “do you consider yourself a hard worker?”

The answer is always going to be yes.

You also don’t want to ask;

“Do you have experience with this software?” Or “Do you have experience with this type of industry?”

It’s too easy of a yes or no question for a candid answer.

You’ll likely get yeses even if the person doesn’t have that experience.

They might not have the experience that you need, so you haven’t really learned anything in this situation.

Ask open ended questions like;

“Tell me about the client experience you have” or, “tell me about the different software you’ve used?”

These open ended questions leave them having to fill in the blanks versus just telling you what you want to hear.

You can also pose hypothetical situations and ask them what they would do in certain situations.

You want to know how they would handle if something happened or if they needed to produce an outcome.

There is a way to get into their head about their thought process and how they would deal with certain situations.

ASKING MORE TECHNICAL QUESTIONS

You can start to get more technical with the role and hear how they would use certain technical things.

Another useful question is to ask about some major challenges that they have been faced with.

Listen to what someone considers a challenge and how they would deal with that challenge.

Knowing how they dealt with the challenge will give you a lot of insight into that person.

FINDING THE RIGHT SKILLSET 

At some point in your interview process, you should think about having a way to test their skills.

This is easy with technical type positions such as a developer, programmer or a coder.

You can easily devise a test that shows people’s coding or development capabilities, or lack thereof.

This becomes a little more challenging when you’re dealing with people on the marketing and sales side of things.

There are still ways to devise a simple project, case study, or presentation for them to do.

Think about what this person will be doing daily and what kind of skills they need to have.

Your process should allow them to demonstrate that they can do what you need, and how they would do it.

FINDING THE RIGHT PERSONALITY

Many companies are now integrating personality assessments in their hiring process which can be very useful.

A Disk Assessment, Talent Plus or the large variety of other talent assessment consulting companies are all resources.

These tests can tell you a lot about someone’s personality and how they may fit and work within your company.

The important thing is to take all the information from them with a grain of salt.

Don’t put too much weight on these tests as they’re standardized.

There is never a substitute for talking to people and feeling them out personally.

The level of usefulness of these assessments has a limit.

You need to make sure you’re responsible for how you use them.

IN CONCLUSION

At the end of the day there is a lot that can be done to design an effective interview process.

Your process should determine if a candidate is a fit culturally and for the hard and tactical skills needed.

There are different strategies to take depending on what kind of role you’re looking to fill.

Whether the role is technical, sales related, marketing, creative, etc., you want to be able to hone in on what you need.

It’s important to keep that in mind as you design whatever process you put those people through.

You want to design a process to be effective, as the impacts of making a bad hire can be severe and debilitating.


Here are some more steps and details to consider in your hiring process:  https://bit.ly/2EW0l3r

Hiring Remote, Partial Remote, and Telecommute Workers

Laptop, mobile phone and coffee cup laying on table with a window view of outside - representing working remotely

Today we’re talking about the pros and cons of hiring remote workers or employing remote or telecommute workers.

It’s important to keep in mind that all businesses are different and this may not work for everyone.

Some businesses are prone to work very well with remote workers while others are not designed to have remote teams.

It’s important to pay attention to this because if your business is a good candidate for remote workers, you can greatly benefit.

If your business is not conducive to hiring remote workers this article may not be relevant to you.

If you want to consider this, you’ll need to see what changes you can make to take advantage of remote workers.

REMOTE WORKERS ARE TRENDING

There is currently a large trend for candidates that are interested in the ability to work remote or partially remote.

Many people nowadays are putting much more emphasis on their work-life balance.

Being able to work remote offers people the flexibility to have their work-life schedule be more balanced.

Many people also work better remote then they do in an office environment.

The office environment can often have many distractions with other coworkers or other things going on.

This of course depends on your office culture, office environment and the type of people that you hire.

Many extremely talented people who are at the top of their field are only interested in working with this flexibility.

THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN HIRING REMOTE

Being open to hiring remote workers opens you up to a segment of the market that you may be missing out on.

If you are thinking of hiring remote workers, you have to consider how that will fit into your existing culture.

If your existing culture is one where everyone is in the office and then you hire someone remote, this could cause friction.

You could produce dissension in the ranks of your employees who might feel left out or jealous if the new person gets to work remote but they don’t.

TRANSITIONING TO HAVING REMOTE WORKERS

If you’re considering taking this on, you want to take inventory on whether your current employees can work remote.

Perhaps you make working remote more like a benefit to be attained if someone reaches certain KPI’s or metrics.

Many sales people are extremely effective working remote.

WHICH POSITIONS WORK BEST REMOTELY

If someone travels a lot and they’re mostly on site with clients, there really is no need to have them in office.

 You can benefit greatly from a rockstar sales person being somewhere else in the country.

Customer service folks and account management people also function very well in a remote capacity.

Believe it or not, accounting folks and financial people can also work very well remote.

You might want to think about having your internal financial people working remote as well.

WHO IS THE RIGHT FIT FOR REMOTE WORK

When hiring remote you should know if they are the kind of personality that’s productive in a remote function.

There are many people who if left to their own devices will not get the work done that needs to get done.

If you have those kind of people working remote you will see a slump in productivity.

Your people should know that their ability to work remote goes hand-in-hand with the results they are on the hook to produce.

In other words working remote should be slated more like a privilege or a benefit that is earned rather than a “right.”

Another trick to hiring a solid remote employee is hiring someone who has been successful working remote in the past.

THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS

There’s also incorporate partial telecommuting where your team is in the office 3-4 days and remote 1-2 days a week.

This model can provide the best of both worlds for you and your employees.

Then you can accomplish the things you need with the team together and have the balance of working remote some days.

This is a very common model that’s being adopted by many companies and is being extremely successful.

This model works if all of your employees are local as you’ll need them in the office together certain days of the week.

RECRUITING REMOTE WORKERS

If you are going to go after remote workers it may be challenging from a recruiting perspective.

Recruiting firms like us are extremely solid resources for being able to tap into other markets for remote work.

Remember, the challenge will be instead of just recruiting in your city you’re going to be recruiting nationwide.

You may even be just recruiting in certain times zones.

Your pool of people to reach out to is going to increase dramatically.

You will need to have a strategy for how to tap into those markets and find the best talent.

Keep in mind that it will likely take a lot of volume, so leaning on a recruiter can be a very valuable resource for tapping into that market.

CONCLUSION

Look at remote and telecommute working as a way to tap into a segment of the market with more great talent.

This is a segment of the market that is growing as more and more people are looking for that work-life balance.

More and more people are looking for the ability to have flexibility around their work schedules.

Many of these types of people can be extremely high producers and will produce better with this type of flexibility.

As managers it’s important for us to focus on hiring the right personalities that can work well autonomously.

This can be more productive for managers also, not having to control and micromanage everybody.

You owe it to yourself to explore this a bit further and see if it’s something that can work for your business.


Here are some great tools for increasing your team’s productivity:

https://bit.ly/2Aj4qrY


 

Recruiting Marketing and Sales Candidates in Seattle

Sunset over the city of Seattle, Washington
RECRUITING IN SEATTLE

Today’s post is about recruiting Marketing, Media, PR and Sales professionals in the Seattle market.

Seattle is currently a fast growing market, especially in the technology space.

Many people think that Seattle is going to be the next Silicon Valley with a lot of technology based companies being started.

We may also see established companies moving and opening up offices in the Seattle area.

A TOUGH MARKET TO FILL

Seattle has challenges from a recruiting perspective and often times will require additional help.

Companies may either use internal recruiting efforts or hire outside firms.

It’s important to know when you need to get extra help for finding specific talent.

The need for talent is extremely high as the market expands and therefore is becoming very competitive.

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION

In order to compete there are certain things that you can do from a recruiting perspective.

Seattle is a great market to offer relocation in the Pacific Northwest and is even attractive from the Midwest.

It is an attractive city and many people, especially the millennial generation, are interested in moving to a city like Seattle.

Seattle offers a lot of outdoor recreation as well as career growth.

It is a smaller market and recruiting only within Seattle can be challenging.

This is another reason to be open to hiring and relocating candidates from other parts of the country.

Portland is a great market to poach people from, as well as Southern California.

The Bay area, Los Angeles, Orange County and San Diego are all great markets to pull talent from, as well as Denver and Chicago.

HIRING REMOTE

If you’re not able to relocate people it’s a good idea to be open to remote workers.

Tapping into the remote work force is great for any company, especially those in smaller markets like Seattle.

Another challenge in Seattle can be the commute due to the geography and traffic in the city.

An already small market can be dropped even further depending on where your company is located and where your talent is located.

This is again another reason to be open to remote or partial remote workers.

If you’re able to find local talent that is partial remote you’re more likely to find folks who would otherwise not be interested.

DEFINE YOUR CULTURE

It’s important to differentiate yourself from your competition.

Your company should have a defined culture with structures and processes put in place that engender the growth of that company. 

You want to be able to communicate that culture and appeal to prospective employees.

Having a strong employer brand is critical now more than ever for attracting the right talent.

Offering benefits like parking passes or other perks will also make it easier for local talent to get to your location.

IN CONCLUSION

Seattle is an excellent market to be in right now.

It’s attracting a lot of talented individuals that you will be able to tap into for your business.

At the same time, more companies are moving to the area and this means more potential competitors for you and your business.

Some of these things can increase your costs, but at the end of the day should also increase your bottom line.

These factors can give you a fighting chance to beating out your competition.

Being open to remote workers and relocating people to your company greatly gives you an advantage for finding good talent.

It’s important to take the necessary steps to have your business compete and your employer brand be one that differentiates you from your competitors.

At the end of the day your employees are what make up your company and it’s critical that you do everything you can to hire and attract the best talent.


Seattle is trending as the decade’s fastest growing city in the US.

Read about it here: https://bit.ly/2km1hSB