Tag Archives: talent

How To Hire A Headhunter

Finding a headhunter, typically, is going to involve a lot of the upfront research and getting referrals from people that you know, etc., There are some other, more in depth, pieces that we’ll cover in this blog.

HEADHUNTERS VS. RECRUITERS

Headhunters can be an extremely critical aspect of your hiring process. A headhunter is different than a recruiter, although headhunters are also recruiters. This is someone who is going to go out and proactively search for candidates on your behalf. They are specialists at understanding their client’s needs and going out and networking to find specific talent for specific roles. A headhunter is a specialist in the sense that they, and only they, are going to know exactly what it takes to do the proactive work to find you specific talent for a specific role.

If you have a position that you can post on job boards and find good candidates for, then you do not need a headhunter for that position. Headhunters are more like a secret weapon that you are going to want to yield for specific roles. This is why headhunters are typically used at the executive level, like Director, VP, and C suite.

But headhunters can oftentimes be used at the entry and mid-level as well. In fact, many of our clients use us at the mid-level, as mid-level professionals are becoming harder and harder to recruit in today’s market. There is actually more of an abundance of senior people than there are of very solid mid-level people. Most organizations are weak when it comes to having strong mid-level people. Especially when it comes to hiring millennials.

CLARIFYING YOUR NEEDS

When you’re looking to hire a headhunter, the thing that is most important for you to get clear about first is what your specific need is. You’re going to want to hire a headhunter that is good and specialized in your specific need. But don’t go to crazy here! Many companies think they need to find a headhunter who does exactly what they do. The truth is, most headhunters specialize in an industry or a niche, not in a particular position.

And headhunting is a skill that can be applied to different industries. A good headhunter can use his network and skills of recruiting to head hunt any type of position. This is what makes a good headhunter a good headhunter. You want someone who knows what it takes to recruit and hunt top talent for any position.

You should actually be more focused in on if the recruiter understands what they’re doing. Do they know how to hunt, have a network, seem smart enough to understand your company, your position and your role? These smarts and these know-how are going to be way more important than someone who happens to work in your industry. Just because they work in your industry, doesn’t mean they’re a good headhunter. Now, if you can find a good headhunter who also specializes in your industry, then you’ve struck gold. This is someone that you want to bring onto your team as an asset.

INTERVIEWING POTENTIAL HEADHUNTERS

When it comes to hiring a headhunter, it’s important to know how to interview them, very similar to interviewing candidates. Many companies make mistakes when interviewing a headhunter because they ask simple yes or no questions that are too easy to answer, and therefore they don’t fully screen and vet properly.

You can’t ask a headhunter if they have experience working in marketing? It’s too easy for that headhunter to say yes. Instead, ask the headhunter to give you examples of some of the positions they’ve recently worked and had success with and some of the types of companies they’ve had success with. You’ll also want to find out about what types of markets they’ve had success working in.

Asking more open-ended questions and having the recruiter fill-in-the-blanks is going to give you a lot better insight into what kind of work they do. Ask them to explain to you some of the specifics or some of the niche details of some of the positions they have worked recently.

Another question you can ask a headhunter is about their process. A good headhunter is never going to give you their whole process, but will give you some insight into what they do. Ask the headhunter what they do and what about their process is unique. These kinds of questions are going to flesh out for you about this headhunter’s style.

HONING IN ON YOUR INDUSTRY

You can also ask them questions about your industry. Asking questions about your industry or the specific position you’re working will have answer in a way that will tell you if they actually have the technical know-how of the position that you’re looking to fill.

Some clients like to have recruiters give them a reference. In other words, they want to talk to one of the recruiter’s other clients to get a reference or insight into working with them. Just like we don’t recommend references with candidates, we also don’t recommend references when it comes to hiring a recruiter or a headhunter.

The reason being is that everybody has at least one or two good references. Whether they’re good or bad at recruiting, their reference is never going to be bad. Talking to references is not the best use of your time when it comes to working with somebody. If you’re able to interview someone and get a good feeling for them, then you should be able to run with that.

RETAINED VS. CONTINGENCY

The last piece here comes down to if you’re gonna hire the recruiter as a contingency headhunter or as a retained headhunter. This is a critical topic and it depends on how urgent your need is and how much challenge you’re having finding good people. If you have an urgent need and you’re challenged finding good people, it’s most likely going to make sense to go with the retainer model. A retainer model is more risky, but almost guarantees results if you’re working with the right headhunter.

Headhunters working from a contingency perspective can only give so much priority to their contingency positions. Retained positions always gain priority, and the recruiter is going take it to the very end until the position gets filled. A lot of companies make a big mistake hiring headhunters on a contingency basis when what they really need is a retained headhunter. Don’t let the fear of spending a little bit of money upfront, and taking some risk, stop you from taking the course that’s going to produce the best and fastest results.

CONCLUSION

The key is that you have interviewed your recruiter or headhunter correctly, so that you take out a lot of the risk when it comes to paying that retainer. Retainers are wildly more effective than contingency searches. For example, here at Aldebaran, our fill rate on retained searches is 95% with over 17 years in business, whereas our contingency fill rate is close to 70%, this is a very large difference.

We can guarantee prioritization of our VIP retained searches indefinitely. With contingency, we can only guarantee so much, and the more challenging your position is, the less we can guarantee it because it’s too risky.

This should give you some tips when it comes to hiring a headhunter. Headhunters are critical aspects to an organization when it comes to hiring specific talent. So you want to know when you need one and when you don’t need one. When you do need a headhunter, make sure you’re smart about it.

How Long Is The Hiring Process?

 

This is an important and very commonly asked question, although it doesn’t have as simple of an answer as you might think.

A simple Google search and you will find all sorts of answers ranging from 20 days up to 45 days.

The problem is many of these statistics are including different types of industries and professionals.

For this reason you won’t get a real clear picture for what you’re looking for.

The average time to hire a person varies greatly depending on many factors.

This includes the type of job, the industry, the candidate, special skills needed and other variables.

All of these things that can significantly increase or decrease the time it takes to hire the right person.

The hiring process is made up of several pieces including sourcing, the actual interview itself, final stages, due diligence and references.

Depending on how your company has things scheduled or how your team has things structured, this also very greatly affects the interview process.

The question I hear quite often is not just how long is the hiring process, but really how fast can I hire someone.

We all want to be able to hire good talent as fast as humanly possible.

FOCUS ON HIGH QUALITY TALENT

I recommend that hiring the right talent be your key focus rather than speed.

You don’t want your interview process to be too long or too short.

Too short and you may risk hiring the wrong person because you didn’t do your due diligence.

Too long and you risk losing good candidates in the process.

In 2017 the average length of hiring processes in the US, according to glassdoor was 23.8 days, which was slightly higher than 2014.

Again this can differ from company to company and throughout industry.

As recruiters here at Aldebaran Recruiting our average is between 30 to 45 days.

This is above the glassdoor average but there also is a different level of care that goes into the work that we do.

Working with a recruiter will likely take a little bit longer if the recruiter is doing their due diligence to find the right person.

The work the recruiter is doing in someway supplements and adds on to the work that you were already doing.

VARYING TIMELINES FOR FILLING A ROLE

If we look at the time it takes to hire within different industries in the US things vary greatly.

The very fastest we have seen is in construction which takes an average of 12.7 days to hire.

On the other end of the spectrum, health services roles take an average of 49 days to hire.

That is a large delta, basically 13 to 50 days.

If we look at professional business services roles, such as a lot of the white-collar jobs of the US, those are right in the middle around 26 days.

As a good rule of thumb I would say 30 days is a good average for the amount of time it should take for you to fill a position.

You can count a little bit longer if your role requires some sort of specific skills and talents.

EXAMINE YOUR HIRING PROCESS

It’s important that you actually examine the time it takes in different aspects of your hiring process.

You want to look at how time is being spent bringing candidates in for first, second, third, etc. round interviews.

This is a place where you can often find time to cut in your hiring process and speed things up.

As written in other blogs, I’m a big proponent of having your hiring and interview process be streamlined and efficient.

This is often the place where clients and companies make the biggest mistake.

They make candidates stay with your interview process and it becomes cumbersome.

RECRUITING AND SOURCING

You may have that part dialed in and the front of the funnel may be suffering.

Here is the actual sourcing and recruiting side of the process or we also call that acquisition.

This is the part where you’re actually attracting qualified candidates for your position.

This is the place where most of our clients have troubles and why they hire a headhunter like us.

They get complaints that they’re not having qualified submissions come through on their website.

They complain that their job is posted on all of the job boards but that the people that are applying for the job boards are low-quality.

This is becoming extremely common in the market.

It’s becoming less and less likely that the right talent for your company would find you on their own.

You’ve got to find ways to be proactive to get your company and your name out to the right people.

And then you want to be able to move them through a streamlined interview process.

This is the number one place where you’re going to speed up your hiring process.

The more niche or specialized, and the more competitive your industry, your company or your market, the longer your hiring process will likely be.

This is going to make the biggest difference in terms of you being able to hire people quickly.

HAVING A STREAMLINED AND EFFICIENT PROCESS

What’s more important is ensuring you have a streamlined and efficient process to find you the best talent that you can hire in the fastest way possible.

Shooting for a 30 to 45 day window is a good goal, but don’t beat yourself up if you end up going a little bit longer.

Especially if you have some type of specialized talent that you’re looking for.

Or conversely if you have something extremely simple, you should be holding yourself to have it be faster.

The key here is to pay attention to your interview and sourcing process. 

These are the places where you have the most control over being able to streamline your process into something that is really workable.

At the end of the day, if your interview process is taking too long or it’s taking too long for you to hire talent this most likely where the issue is.

The front of the funnel is the trickiest part when it comes to recruiting.

Being able to find the right talent and getting them right at the start moving through your interview process.

THE NUMBERS GAME

Here at Aldebaran we talk to between 100 to 200 people in order to show our clients one single good resume for a position.

100 to 200 is a lot of people to be reaching out to and communicating with in order to produce one solid resume.

And we are extremely streamlined and laser focused on what we do.

Anybody using less extremely focused tactics will likely have to talk to three or 400 people before producing a good resume.

This upfront work needs to be streamlined and it needs to have the time in reality to be able to produce a result.

Without that sheer volume being put in the front of the sourcing funnel it’s going to be a slower experience.

If we were only working incoming submissions there are many jobs that may simply never get filled.

Having a proactive outbound recruiting strategy is the number one thing to speed up your process and attract the right people.

CONCLUSION

The real question is not, “how long is the interview or hiring process?”

The real question is, “how do I speed up my hiring process?”

The points in this blog are going to give you a big advantage.

You must put the work in to create a good front of the funnel strategy and put the work in to streamline your interview process.

If you do these things so you can turn your company into a rockstar team and really take things to the next level.


Still piecing together your hiring process? This could help: https://bit.ly/2U8SBzI


Have questions or want to hire us to speed up your process? Let’s chat! 

https://aldebaranrecruiting.com/looking-for-talent/

 

How To Write A Marketing Analytics Job Description

Analytics is a technology that over the recent years has become more of a prevalent need in marketing, media and advertising.

It’s common sense that the better you can measure your results, the better you can tune in to your performance and produce the results that you’re committed to.

Many of our agency clients have been able to bolster their client roster by demonstrating how they produce results through data and analytics.

THE IMPORTANCE OF ANALYTICS

The number one most sought after position in the country right now is for data scientists.

People who can understand and deal with data are becoming more and more sought after.

Data gives us a true insight into the facts of whatever situation we’re dealing with.

Nothing is better than the facts, so that you can find out where you are and work out a plan to get to where you want to go.

Marketing analytics positions are becoming more and more prevalent both at agencies and in-house in marketing departments.

Having strong marketing analytics people to help with strategy and to digest results after campaigns goes a very long way.

This can go far in moving your marketing, advertising, or media strategy and your results to the next level.

ADDING AN ANALYST TO YOUR TEAM

If you’re looking to add a marketing analytics team member to your team, one key place to start is going to be with a solid job description.

You want a job description that clearly spells out what you need so that you are able to attract the right kind of talent.

Often times companies don’t put enough effort into a job description.

This can lead to having qualified candidates pass up applying for your role thinking that they aren’t a right fit for the position.

A good job description will also lead people to share with others they know might be a good fit.

So bottom line is that the job description is critical to attract and hire the right talent for your team, regardless of what the position is.

Particularly with a marketing analytics role, it’s very important to be specific about certain things.

There are a variety of technologies and skills that you may need and some that you may not need.

You want to make sure that you’re very clear about these things so that you bring on the right person.

HAVING A GOOD JOB TITLE

Starting off with the job title is going to be critical.

You want to make sure that the title of the position represents the role so that it fits into your company hierarchy.

The title that you use to advertise the position should be similar to whatever it’s going to be inside your internal hierarchy.

You can sometimes get creative with positions so that it attracts the right people.

Marketing analytics can run across a lot of different types of folks.

For this reason, you want to make sure you hone in on the actual skills you need.

We always recommend that our clients write the job description first and get very clear about what the role and what the requirements are.

You can then decide what the title is going to be based off of what the job description is.

THE FRAMEWORK OF THE JOB DESCRIPTION

You want the description to start off with an intro about your company and your company culture.

The description should end with information about your benefits and compensation structure, or anything along those lines.

The meat of the job description is going to be the actual position description as well as the requirements.

The requirements for the position or the description can go in either order.

I tend to have the requirements first and then the description of the position, but you can’t go wrong either way.

The important thing is that your description of the position is actually spelled out with what the role is going to be doing on a day-to-day basis.

Again, we recommend not having these be too long, as you don’t want any job description to be too long.

WRITING THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE ROLE

10 to 15 bullet points maximum should describe what the position will be doing on a day-to-day basis.

Bullet points should include:

  • the kinds of teams this person will be interacting with
  • how they will be managing people
  • the types of technology they will be interacting with
  • whether they will be presenting to clients or not
  • the types of projects or campaigns they’ll be working on
  • the types of clients they will be working with.

The more detailed you can get about the description, the more it will give potential candidates good insight into what the role will look like.

DEFINING TECHNOLOGY QUALIFICATIONS FOR THE ROLE

When you get into the qualifications section, this is were things certainly need to be detailed.

As mentioned earlier, with analytics roles, there are lot of different levels and depths of technology that you may or may not need.

The last thing you want is to have your position seem like it’s more technical than it actually is.

This could have you lose people that may be good for your role because they think that they’re not technical enough – or vice a versa.

It’s important that you sit down with your team and get very clear about what types of technologies and what depth of technology is required.

Be sure to make a distinction between your must-haves and what would just be nice for you to have.

Make sure this is all spelled out clearly in the job description so that there’s no confusion.

You want to get clear about any particular kinds of technologies that your clients might be interested in or that you may even want to grow into.

Keep in mind when budgeting for a marketing analytics position that the more technical the position is, the higher the salary expectation in the market is going to be.

Make sure that you are budgeting appropriately for the level of technical expertise you’re looking for.

Marketing analytics positions are a mix of technical expertise as well as marketing understanding and strategic expertise.

The blend of these two disciplines is more challenging to find than one or the other on their own.

ATTRACTING THE RIGHT PEOPLE

As with all job descriptions, make sure that after you’ve talked about salary, benefits, culture, etc., you also tell why it’s great to work with you.

You want to really have the job description be your chance to sell the opportunity of the job and your company.

This doesn’t have to be a lot as you don’t want your description to be too long.

You want to make sure that you’re taking time to spell out the reasons that someone would want to work for you.

There might be something to say about your culture or the types of clients you work with.

This could be something about the ability to grow in the role and the potential to move up in the ranks.

You could also include any other perks that your company has that are unique in the marketplace.

There might be something unique about the products or services that you offer that differentiate you from your competition.

CONCLUSION

Marketing analytics is becoming a massively sought after type of position in a variety of companies across the country and the world.

You have to make sure that you have a description that will give you a fighting chance in attracting the right talent and fast.

You must be thoughtful and thorough about writing this job description as well as any others that you’ll be adding to your team.

Taking these measures will save time and effort in hiring the right person.

We all know that hiring the right people as soon as you can makes the biggest difference in having your organization be successful.

Good luck!


Here are some great potential interview questions when looking for that analyst! https://bit.ly/2Qo46UP


Have questions or want to find out about working with us? Let’s chat! 

https://aldebaranrecruiting.com/looking-for-talent/

Top 5 Best Biotech Interview Questions

When hiring in the life sciences industry, there is a specific strategy and specific interview questions you’ll want to ask prospective candidates.

This is important to ensure that you interview and hire the right types of candidates.

This could include the areas of biotech, pharmaceutical and healthcare.

This article will be geared toward hiring in this industry in general, mostly in the marketing, sales and public relations area of things.

Obviously hiring anybody in the sciences capacity, or what we would call a technical capacity, is going to be a little bit different.

In any case though, you can apply these principles when hiring across different segments and types of professionals in the industry.

Regardless of the position, it’s critical that you form your five best questions to ensure that you have a clear picture of what you need.

You want to be clear whether this role is going to be more marketing, public relations, investor relations or sales focused.

Either way at the end of the day it’s important to have a good starting point.

ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS

Like I talk about in other blogs, the most important thing with any type of interview question is that you don’t lead the witness.

This is the biggest mistake interviewers make by asking simple questions that are too easy for candidates to answer.

You don’t want to give the candidate too much of a direction in terms of how to answer your questions.

You want your interview questions designed to get an answer that truly tests or checks in about their candidate experience.

For example, asking something like, “do you have experience marketing pharmaceutical brands?”

This question is leading the witness as it already tells me how to answer it.

It’s too easy for the interviewee to answer the question and figure out what you want to hear versus really understanding their experience.

QUESTION #1

A better way to ask the question, “tell me about the different types of clients or brands that you have experience working with.”

Asking the question this way leaves it open so that the candidate has to answer from their experience.

They have to tell you the types of brands, the types of clients or the types of products that they have worked with.

So again, it’s critical to ask open ended questions so that the candidate will tell you about their client and/or brand experience.

You’re also going to want to know the types of customers and products that they are used to working with.

You want to hear it from them without you giving them a jumping off point.

QUESTION #2

A second critical question is whether or not the candidate has experience working with direct consumer or working with healthcare practitioners.

You don’t want to ask, “do you have experience with direct to consumer” or “do you have experience working with healthcare professionals?”

That’s too easy of a question to answer with a yes or a no and of course they’re going to answer with what you want to hear.

If it’s a sales role, you can ask something like, “tell me about who you were selling to.”

That should elicit a response that will tell you if they were selling more direct to consumer or to healthcare practitioners or a combination of both.

The more clear you are about what you need in the position the better you will know if their experience is a match.

QUESTION #3

Another critical question is designed so that you learn about the types of projects, campaigns, etc. the candidate has experience with.

Do not ask, “do you have experience working with social media” or do you have experience with search engine optimization?”

These questions lead to witness and are easy to answer yes to.

Remember to ask open ended questions like, “tell me about the types of campaigns or projects you have experience working on.”

Have them tell you about their day-to-day.

It is critical for you to hear what their day looks like and to understand the types of campaigns and projects they have experience with.

QUESTION #4

The next question will gauge and determine what type of leadership or mentorship experience the candidate has or doesn’t have.

Depending on the role that you’re filling it may be important this person has management experience.

Or maybe it’s more important that they have hands-on tactical execution experience.

Do not ask a question like, “would you consider yourself hands off” or “would you consider yourself a strong leader?”

These these questions are too easy to just answer yes or no.

You do want to ask, “tell me about your tactical hands-on experience” or “tell me about your managerial experience.”

You could also ask, “tell me what your day looks like” or “tell me what percentage your managing others is hands-on.”

The point is to continue to ask open ended questions which has them tell you what their day-to-day looks like.

You want to hear their managerial and tactical hands-on experience so you know whether they’re a fit for the role that you’re filling.

QUESTION #5

The final important question on list is about salary.

Nowadays asking about salary is tricky because in certain states you can no longer legally ask for salary history.

If you are able to ask what someone’s most recent salary is, that’s a critical question.

If you can legally ask their most recent compensation was, both base and any incentives and benefits.

It’s important early on to find out what someone’s compensation expectations are.

You want to be sure that you’re in the ballpark when it comes to your budget before getting too far down the line.

This could end up being a huge waste of time if their expectations aren’t in your budget.

If you’re not able to directly ask about someone’s compensation you might have to figure out ways to learn what makes sense.

I like asking things like, “what makes sense for you in terms of salary for your next role?”

Or “what is a logical progression for you from your current salary to your next salary?”

You want to ask questions in a way that has a candidate think about what makes sense rather than just from what they would like.

Everybody wants to get paid a ton of money!

Candidates tend to think they can just ask for whatever salary they want and get it.

Asking them in a way that has them think from what’s logical, what’s fair and what makes sense is going to be much better.

This is going to give you a realistic number rather than a pie in the sky number that could shut things down.

CONCLUSION

These five questions are not as important as your contract, but more important in terms of the way that you ask them.

You want to ask open ended questions that don’t lead the witness.

Apply these principles and you will go along way to improve your interview process!


Looking for more great interview questions to add to your list? Here are some great ideas! https://muse.cm/1hLMaHT


Have questions or want to find out about working with us? Let’s chat! 

https://aldebaranrecruiting.com/looking-for-talent/

How To Write A VP Of Sales Job Description

how to write a vp of sales job description

Writing a job description for a VP of Sales can often be a daunting task.

It’s something that many hiring managers don’t like doing and don’t even really have the time to do.

A good VP of Sales job description though can go along way in attracting the right kind of talent for your team or organization.

A poorly written job description will often result in unqualified resumes and wasted time sifting through the wrong people for your team.

A good job description can be a powerful tool that will give you an edge in hiring the best talent in the market.

Often times we work with clients that have job descriptions that don’t truly match what the job is that they’re looking to hire. 

And they wonder why they’re not getting the right kind of candidates with the right kind of skills.

Usually, candidates apply for a job that is a match for their skill set or they apply for random jobs, it’s usually not somewhere in the middle.

So a well-written job description does give you a chance at finding people that are right for your needs.

POORLY WRITTEN VP OF SALES JOB DESCRIPTIONS

Candidates often think they’re not the right fit for a job because they read a job description that doesn’t seem to match their skills.

In fact, many times, we already know that they’re a fit for the job because we’ve spoken with the client.

Poorly written job descriptions can also result in candidates who are actually a fit for what you need not applying for your job.

This is another way that you can lose out on good talent!

At the end of the day, it’s worth the time and energy to write a good job description and it doesn’t have to be as challenging as you may think.

VP OF SALES JOB DESCRIPTIONS

Writing a sales job description is particularly important because there are a lot of different ways salespeople work across different industries.

A sales job description needs to articulate certain critical aspects in order to communicate effectively what is needed for the job.

Job titles can be very deceiving and even leave more questions, particularly when it comes to sales roles.

It’s important that the job description communicates what the role is so that people are not solely relying on the title.

For example, a VP of sales could be a department head who’s leading a team of sales people.

VP of sales could also be an individual contributor who does not manage any team members and is selling on their own.

And they could also be anything in between these two extremes.

It’s critical that if you’re hiring for VP sales you want to start off by being clear about what this position is in your company.

WRITING THE JOB DESCRIPTION

This rule of thumb really goes for any type of job you may be writing a job description for.

The first step is to start jotting down and brainstorming about the key functions this role is going to need.

You want to make sure you narrow it down to 10 or less key functions within a role.

I would even say that a sweet spot really is five key functions.

Whether that be managing a team of sales executives or selling on their own or a combination of both.

They could be building a team or focusing on channel relationships and partnerships or managing and/or doing inside or outside sales.

VP OF SALES ROLES ARE EXTREMELY DIVERSE

You want to hone in on exactly the type of sales and the type of management this person is going to be doing.

There’s a big difference between inside sales, outside sales, lead generation, channel sales, partner sales, and the list goes on.

There are also different parts of the sales cycle that many roles will or won’t be responsible for.

For example, will this part of the role be responsible for cold calling in generating leads?

Will they be responsible for managing relationships, closing sales and closing warm leads?

Will this person be reselling to existing customers?

Often times it’s a combination of all these things.

FOUR SECTIONS OF A VP OF SALES JOB DESCRIPTION

It’s critical to flush out exactly what the key functions of the role are going to be so that this all gets spelled out in a job description.

We recommend a VP of Sales job description always has four sections.

The first section should be a company overview which gives an overview of your company and some insight into your culture.

You want to make sure that this section mentions some key points.

This should include anything about you being fast growing, anything about your industry, and some of your successes.

Also, include some of the things that are great and unique about working with you.

VP OF SALES SKILLS AND QUALIFICATIONS

The next two sections are the meat of the job description.

This will include the required skills or qualifications.

These are hard skills and qualifications that this person is going to already need to have to bring to the table.

So this is where you may need something like a track record in building sales teams or selling a certain amount of sales per year or working with certain types of budgets.

You may need a track record of working in certain industries or with a certain type of company or client.

You may need a track record of selling into a particular vertical, or of selling to a particular decision maker.

Next, you’re going to have the key must have’s for the role.

We recommend this section not be too long and that you distinguish between what is a must-have and what is a nice-to-have.

This is also where we recommend having years of experience.

Years of experience truly is just a number, but it is a good gauge and we do recommend putting it on a section of your job descriptions.

VP OF SALES ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

The third section is the actual job description.

This tells what the role is, what it’s going entail, what it’s going to accomplish and what it’s going to be responsible and accountable for.

This is where you want to spell out what the roles and responsibilities are going to be so that is very clear what this role is.

This can come before the required skills or after – it’s up to you.

The point is these sections can be flip-flopped.

ABOUT YOUR COMPANY

The final section is always good to give an overview of your company benefits and anything else about company culture.

Anything that you didn’t cover in the first section can be added here and is a nice way to round out a job description.

You can also mention compensation or salary here if you’d like.

However, we recommend not putting in salary or compensation on a job description and leaving that open for discussion in your first interview.

Lastly, you don’t want a job description to be too long.

All of this should onto two to three pages maximum.

CONCLUSION

Writing a VP of Sales job description does not have to be complicated.

It’s four simple parts and typically the first and fourth parts can be recycled from job description to job description, regardless of the role.

Sections two and three are going to require the most work.

You’re going to want to make sure to hone in on these sections and that they’re complete, clear and concise.

In conclusion, writing a job description particularly for a role like a VP of sales is critical.

You will be able to attract and not turn away the right talent for your team.

Best of luck!


Here are some more great tips for hiring the right sales team! https://bit.ly/2DFQZIy


Have questions or want to find out about working with us? Let’s chat! 

https://aldebaranrecruiting.com/looking-for-talent/

Top 5 Digital Marketing Interview Questions

Hiring for marketing in today’s landscape can be challenging.

There are a lot of different types of marketing out there. 

A lot of professionals are specialized working in one or sometimes many marketing channels.

It’s important to make sure that you’re able to hire somebody who is going to be able to do the job you need them to do.

Marketing is especially a critical aspect of any business, as marketing and sales are the lifeblood of an organization.

So making a good or bad hire in marketing can make or break your organization.

At the end of the day it all comes down to talent, so hiring the right talent is your job.

Hiring in general is tricky and interviewing truly is an art.

GETTING CLEAR ABOUT YOUR NEEDS

First and foremost, before you even get to the interview stage it’s critical that you have a clear picture of what you need.

Often times, hiring managers will start to interview candidates without having a clear picture of what they need.

You’ll want to sit down and get clear about what the different channels are that are critical for your business.

If this is already spelled out and clear for you then you can skip this step.

If not, we recommend truly examining this and deciding which channels are important to you.

Sometimes candidates have expertise and other channels that will crossover.

For example, search engine optimization and search engine marketing have a lot of crossover, but they’re not the same.

If you need someone who is heavily focused in SEO or SEM you’ll need to tailor your interview process to flesh out that person’s strengths.

Most people who do SEO also know how to do SEM, but they may be stronger or weaker in one or the other.

BEYOND SEO AND SEM

There are also many other digital channels that you could need for your business.

Some things to consider aside from SEO and SEM are email marketing, social media, paid social or other types of paid or display ads.

You might need someone strong in writing content for different ads, and/or someone stronger from a strategy perspective.

You need to take all of these things into account when you’re writing a job description.

Nowadays digital marketing people need to be much more involved from an analytics and campaign perspective.

You’ll need to figure out a way to screen for this if it’s important to your business.

WHAT ABOUT TECHNOLOGY?

The other thing that you’ll need to be clear about is how technical you need this person to be.

Are they going to be making website updates?

Do they need to have a design background?

Should they have some development skills?

Marketing is tied so much with technology nowadays that these are things you’ll need to consider.

Your position may be more or less specialized and you may need somebody with only one or two channels of expertise.

On the other hand, you may need someone who is extremely multi channeled who knows how to market in a wide variety of channels.

Getting very clear about all of this will help you tailor your interview questions.

DO NOT LEAD THE WITNESS

Many interviewers make the common mistake of what we call “leading the witness” when interviewing a candidate.

What we mean by that is asking questions that are too easy to answer.

Asking a question like, “are you good at search engine marketing?” makes it very easy for a candidate to just answer “yes.”

So they have told you exactly what you want to hear.

This is particularly important when hiring marketing folks, and especially when you need to hone in on someone with digital expertise.

ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS

Asking the right questions when interviewing digital marketing candidates is everything!

QUESTION #1

The number one thing to ask a digital marketing person is to tell you about recent campaigns and projects they’ve been responsible for.

Ask them to walk you through the day-to-day of running those campaigns and projects and what they have their hands on.

You want to ask open ended questions like, “walk me through your day to day” and “what are your most recent projects and campaigns?”

Asking this question in this way is going to give you insight into what the person’s day looks like and doesn’t lead to witness.

It doesn’t give them something to launch off from to tell you what they think you want to hear.

You want questions that actually have them walk through their day to day.

Then you can get a sense of what this person has been doing and see if that matches up with what you need.

MEASURING PERFORMANCE

QUESTION #2

The next critical question for marketing candidates is having them explain what their KPI’s are, and how they’re measured and managed for their performance.

Find out what they think important KPI’s are, how they measure KPI’s and how they adjust and optimize different projects in the campaigns they’re running.

It’s critical that a marketing person is connected to their performance and outcomes of their activities.

You want to get some insight into how this person knows they’re effective or not effective.

QUESTION #3

Another critical question is what they think the most important aspects of marketing are when it comes to acquiring customers.

You want to understand their philosophy, where they come from and how they think as a marketer.

It is critical for you to evaluate them as a marketer as well as to see if their philosophy on marketing lines up with your company values and strategy.

HANDLING CHALLENGES

QUESTION #4

A fourth great question to ask candidates is to have them tell you about a challenging campaign or project that they have come across.

You want to hear of a major hurdle or article that they needed to overcome.

Have them walk you through what the problem was, what happened and how they dealt with it.

This will give you insight into their thinking and how they solve problems from a marketing perspective.

The more specific you get them to answer, the better, as you’ll get a sense of how they deal with problems as a marketer and how they overcome them.

HIRING FOR CULTURE FIT

QUESTION #5

Last, but not least you want to ask them to tell you what their idea work environment and company culture looks like.

When asking candidates this, ask them to be honest because people tend to want to tell the interviewer what they think they want to hear.

Candidates want to get the job and so they’ll likely tell you that they’re going to fit in with your company.

You want to really know if working together would really be a good fit.

There are lot of different people and a lot of personalities out there in the world and not everybody works well together.

It’s important to keep in mind that is not a problem at all, you just have to keep looking.

There is a lid for every pot and so you want to make it safe for the candidate to tell you about their ideal culture.

You want to be able to truly gauge if they would be a good fit for you and for them.

In the same breath you can also ask about some of the things that they don’t like in a work environment and culture.

You can gauge dislikes against your company culture as well.

CONCLUSION

These are some simple steps that you can apply when it comes to hiring digital marketing people. 

If you’re smart you’ll be able to take these questions and apply them to any type of professional.

Your interview questions should all be tailored and used to hire the best marketing talent out there to grow and scale your business.

Good luck!


If you’re still building your interview questions, here’s a great resource! https://muse.cm/1hLMaHT


Have questions or want to find out about working with us? Let’s chat! 

https://aldebaranrecruiting.com/looking-for-talent/

How To Decide Who To Hire

Hiring the right talent for your company and your team is critical for anyone interested in growing and scaling their company, team, or organization.

THE COST OF A BAD HIRE

Making a bad hire can have drastic consequences, not only financially but also to team morale and overall company health.

A bad hire is not only a major inconvenience, but it can also cost thousands of dollars.

The average price to replace a millennial that was a bad hire is over $20,000.

Do this too many times and you could see yourself out of business very quickly.

AVOIDING MAKING BAD HIRES

It’s more important than ever to make sure that you have the correct processes, structures, and procedures in place to ensure that you make the right hires.

Sometimes you may end up with more than one great candidate for a particular role and it may be challenging to decide who’s the best fit.

Without the proper structures and processes in place, you will leave yourself vulnerable to making these costly mistakes.

It’s worth the time and effort needed to put these measures in place and to lower your risk of making a bad hire.

DON’T JUDGE A BOOK BY ITS COVER

First and foremost, one of the things that we make sure to do here at Aldebaran is to never judge a book by its cover.

Deciding who to interview based on a resume is critical.

You obviously don’t want to interview people that don’t look like they have the requirements for the job.

But you also don’t want to put too much stock in a resume.

Keep in mind people have varying skills at writing resumes and a resume is not fully representational of a person.

You have to be able to see through the resume in order to be able to decide who the best people are to talk to.

Often times a resume will leave you with more questions than answers.

You want to make sure you aren’t bringing too many preconceived notions to the picture.

ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS

Your interview process is going to be the most important thing when it comes to hiring the right talent.

The number one mistake interviewers tend to make in interviews is they lead the witness.

In other words, they ask questions that are too simple to be answered with a yes or no question.

It’s important that you don’t make it too easy for a candidate to tell you what you want to hear.

Interviewers often ask questions like, “have you worked on digital marketing campaigns before?” That is an easy yes for anybody.

People tend to tell you what they think you want to hear to be as strategic as possible when it comes to getting the job.

You have to form your interview questions in a way that teases out the answers that you want.

Don’t ask, “do you work on digital marketing campaigns?”

Instead ask, “tell me about the types of campaigns that you’ve worked on?”

Don’t ask, “do you work well in a fast-paced environment?”

Instead ask, “tell me your ideal work environment and what type of environment would you say that you thrive in?”

You want to have them go into as much detail as possible.

OPEN COMMUNICATION AND FULL DISCLOSURE

Often it’s important to open the communication and invite candidates to be honest with you.

We are very conditioned to tell people in an interview what we think they want to hear.

It’s your job as the interviewer to be straight with your candidates.

Let them know that neither of you wants to work together if it’s not the right fit.

Give them full disclosure that you’re going to ask questions and they should be as honest as possible so that you can both gauge if it’s the right fit.

That kind of transparency is critical when actually getting to the core and asking people questions.

INTERVIEWING AND HIRING FOR CULTURE

Another critical aspect that you need to be able to interview for his culture.

Culture is key and tends to be more important than hard skills.

If you get the right person that fits with your culture, you can teach them certain things and fill certain gaps much easier.

The first step to interviewing for culture is having a well-defined culture in your company.

If your company doesn’t have a well defined culture that is present and alive with your employees, then there’s no way you can interview for it.

If you do have a well defined culture in place then you should have core values and a core focus that you can interview people for.

You can ask people what kind of culture is best for them. 

You can ask for examples of problems that they’ve solved or challenges they’ve had in the past.

And ask for examples of things that they like and don’t like with current or previous companies.

We also recommend after those questions that you go over your core values and culture with them.

You want to tell them what the expectations would be inside the culture and core values.

Then they can make the decision for themselves whether or not the culture is the right fit for them.

TESTING YOUR CANDIDATES

Many employees come in to a job and are surprised by things they should have been informed about during the interview process.

You don’t want employees to be surprised by the hard skills required of the job or the culture of your company.

It’s critical from a hard skills perspective that you figure out a way to test your candidates that come through.

This can be simple with technical roles because you can do coding tests and reprogramming tests. 

It can get a little bit more tricky with people in marketing and client services.

With somebody who is a creative, it’s a good idea to give them a writing test and of course to look at previous samples of their work.

For someone who is more of a campaign person, you may have them do a mock campaign, project or presentation.

The bottom line is you want some way to test and see how they would do the job that you would be hiring them for.

You cannot take people solely on their word.

You need to be able to see it and have it be part of your interview process.

REFERENCE CHECKS?

Reference checks are becoming a thing of the past, are becoming less and less relevant and not the best use of time in today’s fast-moving market.

The reason being is that no one is ever going to give somebody a bad reference.

Where a reference can come in use is if you’ve got two candidates and you can’t decide between who to hire.

Then you can check references on them both to see if one of them is more glowing or better than the other. 

That is the only time we recommend doing reference checks.

If you’re on the fence about hiring someone this could be another possible scenario for doing reference checks.

You can speak to their previous supervisor and ask candidly about your concerns with this person.

These conversations need to be done correctly though so that you can level with that person and get accurate answers about your concerns.

Some references are going to be more honest with you and some will just be more ingratiating with their candidate.

WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU HAVE A TOSS UP

At the end of the day, if you need to decide between two candidates in terms of who’s going to be the best fit then we recommend you look more at culture.

They likely have similar hard skills so you should talk with your team about who is going to be the best long-term fit for the company.

You want to figure out who is going to fit in best with your group and who is going to be the embodiment of your core values, etc.

Bottom line is that the best culture fit is going to be more important and the harder thing to find. 

IN CONCLUSION

Incorporating these tips into your interview and hiring process will go a long way in hiring the right people.

We recommend having your interview process be a standard process that all candidates go through and that it be the same for everybody.

Standardized process allows for you to make changes if needed and it’s critical that you are constantly looking to learn and grow.

Happy hunting!


Want more tips on refining your interview process? Check this out: https://bit.ly/2CjHtWP


Have questions or want to find out about working with us? Let’s chat! 

https://aldebaranrecruiting.com/looking-for-talent/

What Is Headhunting?

Headhunting is really an aspect of recruiting.

You could say that all headhunters are recruiters, but not all recruiters are headhunters.

In fact, most recruiters aren’t headhunters at all.

And even most recruiters who consider themselves headhunters, aren’t truly headhunters.

A true headhunter possesses a specific skill set which allows them to effectively and aggressively tap into the passive talent market.

They are able to track and attain specific talents that would never have found out about a role or position otherwise.

HEADHUNTING VS. RECRUITING

Headhunters are really more like actual hunters, where recruiters are really more like farmers.

A normal recruiter is typically going to rely on a high volume of inbound submissions.

These passive submissions usually come from other job boards, a company web portal or something of that nature.

A recruiter is mostly working with active talent that is out in the market.

These people are applying for jobs, interviewing with multiple companies and submitting to a wide variety of companies.

Another thing a recruiter tends to deal with is having to screen hundreds and hundreds of irrelevant resumes.

Job boards are making it increasingly easier for people to apply to all kinds of positions without seeing if they’re a good fit.

On one side of the recruiting spectrum is a fully passive recruiter who is only dealing with inbound submissions.

On the other end of the spectrum you have a headhunter who doesn’t rely on inbound submissions at all.

A headhunter will almost never even talk to someone who is an inbound submission.

A HEADHUNTER’S NETWORK

Headhunters are 100% proactive in what they do, which is why it’s so important to have a well established network.

In headhunting, a well established network is defined by a large candidate pool.

A large candidate pool is no good unless you know how to interact in a way that’s going to get you the results you need.

A good headhunter knows how to continuously be expanding their network.

They will know how to massage their network in different ways to be able to constantly be drumming up new talent.

This is why headhunters tend to have more of a hunter and sales mentality than a recruiter on the other side of the spectrum.

WORKING WITH A HEADHUNTER

Headhunters are very good at learning exactly what their clients need as far as quality over quantity.

They will ask a lot of questions about what specifics are needed for a particular role, both hard skills and soft skills.

The more questions a headhunter asks, the more they’re going to be able to hone in on what their client needs.

Once the picture is clear about what the client needs, a headhunter is going to use their candidate network.

They will also use their extended network to make contact with hundreds, if not thousands of people.

RECRUITING PASSIVE TALENT

The majority of those are likely not actively on the job market looking for a job.

A headhunter is skilled at starting initial conversations with these people.

They will be able to get them interested, engaged and potentially making a move from their current company.

It requires a very specific skill set and a certain finesse to be able to get someone interested in another role when they’re happy where they’re at.

A headhunter is very good at building relationships and trust with candidates.

This allows them to guide them through the process while continually selling and closing them along the way.

Working with passive talent requires a lot more handholding and selling of an opportunity along the way.

This is an important distinction that many recruiters and hiring managers don’t understand.

Someone who is currently working needs to be treated differently than someone who isn’t working or is already actively looking.

Someone actively looking for a position already has a very high degree of motivation to make a move.

Passive candidates don’t have as high motivation and it’s a good headhunter’s job to move them to a place of high motivation.

This is where more of a selling piece comes into play and less of a farming piece.

SEEKING SPECIALIZED TALENT

Headhunters are best used when you are requiring some sort of specialized talent.

If you have a role that is specialized in any way you’re likely going to need someone to lead a proactive effort to find the right person.

It’s highly unlikely that specialized talent is going to find your job on a job board or your website.

The odds of this happening with even one person are extremely slim, let alone with a handful of people to choose a quality candidate from.

With any sort of specialized role you’re looking to fill it’s critical to have an outbound proactive strategy in order to find those people.

Those people are most likely working for your competition or in adjacent industries or verticals.

This is also where a headhunter is going to be extremely effective and useful at tapping into your competition. 

They will tap into neighboring industries and verticals and give you an advantage to poach from some of your competition and other companies.

The ability to poach highly effective and sought after talent will give you a certain competitive edge in being able to compete in the marketplace.

Often times the people who are not working and are actively looking for a position are in that place for a reason.

HEADHUNTING PASSIVE TALENT

The best talent on the market is typically the passive talent.

We know many candidates who have never applied for a job in their life and have never been on the market looking.

They’ve always been sought after or recruited and have only moved jobs when they were recruited by headhunter.

Those are the kind of people that you want to be able to get for your organization as that is the best talent in the market.

The absolute only reliable way to go after those people is to have them headhunted.

The only other second option is going to be networking within your organization or pure luck.

Networking within your organization or your own network can be a very useful tool.

That is something that should be explored, but it’s likely it will be exhausted fairly quickly.

You want to have an abundance of solid talent coming your way so that you’re able to pick the best of the best.

A headhunter is going to give you the ability to pick the best of the best.

CONCLUSION

Headhunters are recruiters, but not all recruiters are headhunters.

On a spectrum of recruiting, regular recruiters are more like farmers and headhunters are more like hunters.

Headhunters are extremely useful for proactive poaching from competition and also proactive tapping into the passive talent pool.

Make sure to assess your needs and figure out what the best strategy is for you and your company.

It’s likely a headhunter is going to be useful in many ways and the trick is finding a good one.

Check out some of our other blogs about the best way to work with recruiters.


Not sure if hiring a recruiter is right for you? Here are some things to consider: https://bit.ly/2ybIQ9L


Want to find out about working with us? Let’s chat! https://aldebaranrecruiting.com/looking-for-talent/

How To Recruit Employees Effectively

A major question that many hiring managers, human resource professionals, and business owners have is how to recruit employees effectively.

This is a multi-faceted question that requires a deep dive into best practices and best strategies.

For the purpose of this blog we will take a surface level view of many of the key aspects to give you a competitive advantage on recruiting employees.

What we will cover here will be applicable to anybody looking to hire any type of position for any type of company.

That means you could be a business owner, a human resources professional, a team leader, or anybody else looking to hire for your team.

We recommend that this question of how to recruit employees effectively is a question that you constantly ask.

This is an area that you can always get better at and always have your team building a next level of efficiency.

The better you are at effectively recruiting employees the better you will be at attracting and hiring the top talent in the market.

The more top talent you have on your team, the better your company is going to perform.

The company is nothing more than its people.

HAVING AN EFFECTIVE RECRUITING STRATEGY

First and foremost, if you’re going to be an effective recruiter for your company you must have a solid and proactive outbound recruiting strategy.

Your recruiting strategy cannot rely solely on job boards or passive submissions on your website or LinkedIn, etc.

Job boards like LinkedIn, Monster, CareerBuilder, etc. will get your job out there and will bring in candidates.

However, the quality of candidates with these types of submissions tend to be low and you will also spend a lot of time sifting through resumes.

Generally, the best talent on the market is not actively looking for a new position.

The best talent on the market is likely doing an awesome job in a position somewhere with one of your competitors.

It’s going to be up to you to recruit them away and onto your team.

Therefore you must have a proactive outbound recruiting strategy and a recruiter or recruiters that are dedicated to this.

You can have an internal recruiting team that resides in house in your company or you can work with outside vendors like us.

Either way, it’s critical you have the strategy in place.

You need to have recruiters who know how to tap into the passive talent market to find you the best talent out there.

HAVING A CLEAR EMPLOYER BRAND AND CULTURE

Along with a strong outbound proactive recruiting strategy you also need to have a strong employer brand.

An employer brand is what your company represents to your employees and prospect of employees.

You want a well-built career page on your website that explains your culture, what you do, who you are, what you value and what’s important to you.

We recommend also showcasing your benefits on your website and any other perks that may be involved with working with your company.

A strong employer brand goes along way in making your company seem attractive to prospective employees.

The more questions you can answer about your culture, benefits, perks, values, etc., the easier it will be to talk with prospective employees.

A strong employer brand is critical in representing yourself to the perspective employee marketplace.

LEVERAGING CURRENT EMPLOYEES

The second key point is that you want to leverage your employees.

Your employers are one of your biggest assets when it comes to recruiting effectively for your company.

Your current employees should have a solid understanding of your employer branding.

A good experience of your company is a critical aspect of your employer brand.

Your employer brand should go beyond just a nice website.

Your brand needs to seep into your company culture so that all of your employees are billboards for your company.

You want all of your employees to be fully bought into the vision of your company.

When this is the case, you can then leverage them as advocates of your company.

They likely know a lot of people in the market who would be perfect to join your company and they have large networks and many connections.

You want to be able to tap into those networks and tap into those connections.

Employees are able to sell your company and the opportunity of your company a lot better than a recruiter.

Having a strong employer brand will also help with employee retention – another key point that you want to keep your eye on.

HAVING A SMOOTH INTERVIEW PROCESS

Another thing to keep an eye on is your actual interview process itself.

You need to have a streamlined and effective interview process that leaves candidates with an excellent experience of your company and who you are.

Whether they get the job or not, you want everybody to have a good experience of your company.

In a fast-moving market like we’re seeing here in 2018 you also need to have an interview process that is efficient and moves quickly.

Many hot candidates are being courted by multiple companies at one time.

You want to make sure you move candidates through your process quickly so you don’t lose them to another offer.

Some clients might say that if a candidate doesn’t want to wait through the process then they’re not the right person.

This is a bad strategy that we do not recommend.

You want to move quickly and efficiently no matter what as it’s good for your company and for candidates.

DEFINING YOUR ROLE AND JOB DESCRIPTION

Another important aspect to keep in mind is that for any particular position you want to have a very clear picture of what you’re looking for.

If you have a job description that is not clearly defined, you’re going to have a hard time truly evaluating if somebody is the right fit for the role.

You could end up mistakenly hiring someone that isn’t the right fit because you didn’t interview them against an appropriate measuring stick.

The more clarity you have the more you will be able to customize your interview process and weed out the right people.

TESTING CANDIDATES FOR SKILLS

Along these same lines you want to find a way to test the skills of people you’re interviewing.

It’s not enough to just ask someone if they can do a particular job because most of the time they will just say yes.

You need to find a way to test the candidates in your interview process.

This could be a sample presentation, a case study, some sort of technical test, or something of this nature.

You want to find a way to test candidates in a real life scenario so that you get an actual picture of them doing the potential job.

This is easier said than done for many types of roles, but will go along way after you develop it in your process.

PRESENTING AND NEGOTIATING THE OFFER

Lastly you want to constantly be doing homework about what is the best way to present and negotiate an offer to potential employees.

One of the biggest mistakes clients make is to have their first initial offer to a candidate be a lowball offer.

They may think that’s a good idea because it gives them room negotiate.

While you should not come to the table with your best offer, that also does not mean lowballing a candidate.

Lowballing a candidate at the start will often turn them off very quickly.

This is an easy way to kill the deal after you’ve spent a long time putting someone through the interview process.

Again, don’t make an offer that is your best offer right off the bat.

You want to leave some wiggle room for negotiation as everybody wants to feel like they can get a better deal for them self.

DEFINING BENEFITS IN YOUR COMPENSATION PLAN

Be sure to that your offers come with detailed information about your benefits and perks.

It’s a good idea to put a monetary value on the benefits and perks so that you can calculate that into your total compensation package.

For example, if you’ll be contributing for health insurance, life insurance, paid days off etc. that could add up to another $15-20,000.

So essentially the person would be making $120,000 total compensation rather than just the $100,000 base.

The more you’re able to spell out someone’s total compensation, the better picture you’re able to paint about what they’re actually signing up for.

Candidates tend to be very bad at looking at the big picture and just focus on the base salary number.

CONCLUSION

There are a lot of steps you can take to becoming a more effective recruiter for your company.

The steps to recruiting employees effectively are not linear and it’s really a practice that has many facets to pay attention to.

If you pay attention to all these facets, you can turn your organization into a highly effective machine that will go after the best talent in the market.

We wish you the best!


Need some help writing your job description? Here’s a great start: https://bit.ly/2OcYYlx

Hiring For Culture In Marketing And Sales

Hiring for culture and/or personality is often times even more important than hiring for hard skills.

This can be more challenging than hiring for hard skills as hard skills are often easier to test and screen for.

Culture and personality can be multifaceted and more difficult to screen individuals for.

But there are certain strategies and steps that can be taken to give you a competitive edge.

You want to hire the right types of people and personalities to blend in well with the culture of your company and employees.

It’s critical that you hire people correctly from a cultural perspective for many reasons such as employee longevity.

Employees will not stay long with a company that they don’t feel is a match for their personality.

They will regularly feel out of place or will be unhappy and you’ll soon notice a high level of turnover in your organization.

Happy employees are productive employees!

One of the ways to make sure both new and existing employees are happy is to make sure that you hire along certain cultural lines.

WHY DEFINE YOUR CULTURE?

If you’re interested in hiring for culture you must have a defined culture for your company.

The first big mistake that many companies make is not having their culture clear and defined.

They attempt to hire for culture without actually having a well defined culture!

This seems obvious, but it’s not.

If you try to hire for culture without a well-defined culture, good luck!

Without a well defined culture you will have no guiding principles to use in order to steer you in screening people.

You should have something concrete to show potential candidates to give them the insight to know if they’re a fit for the role.

If your company occurs like it doesn’t really have a culture, this can be just as detrimental as having a negative culture.

Typically, a negative culture is the fallout of not having a well-defined culture.

This in turn can end up with a mix of different personalities which tends to go in a default negative direction.

DEFINING YOUR COMPANY CULTURE

You can involve other key executives, and even your current employees, depending on the size of your company.

It will be important that you create not only the external brand for your company, but also an employer brand.

This should be outlined in a document and there should be structures in place to engender, grow, reward and nurture this culture.

It’s a good idea to have certain employees be brand ambassadors to engender and nurture the brand across the company.

You can create different contests and all kinds of interesting things to ensure you have a robust culture.

This is a topic that we will cover in future blogs in further detail.

But this is the first step – if you are interested in hiring for culture you’ve got to have a culture!

DOCUMENTING YOUR CULTURE

Again, it’s important that this be written down somewhere and explicated in a very clear and concise manner.

You will want to use this document as part of your hiring process.

Prospective employees should be able to read and see the document which outlines the expectations around culture.

Prospective employees should be clear about what your company culture is, what it stands for, and what the expectations are.

They should be able to meet with as many team members as possible to get an in person feel for the culture.

It is critical for prospective employees to be able to do their own due diligence.

You want them to be able to determine if your company and the position are going to be a good fit for them.

Many times prospective employees won’t do enough due diligence in determining if a company is a good fit for them.

This is something that often leads to making a bad hire.

It’s not the employer’s fault if the employee has not done enough research to see if the company is a good fit.

You want to hedge this for yourself and expose a potential employee to your company culture as much as possible.

Then there will be no surprises for them when they show up on day one.

TOOLS FOR ENSURING CULTURAL FIT

This is something you want to check on multiple times throughout your interview process.

This will truly ensure that you have a good match both for yourself and for the candidate.

Another major tool that employers use are personality assessment tests.

Things like the disk assessment test and many other companies who offer similar products and services.

Some personality tests are extremely in-depth, some are just surface level and there is everything in between.

Personality tests can be a good tool to get a general gage if someone will fit into your company culture.

Ultimately you have to take these tests with a grain of salt as they aren’t perfect and can be more or less accurate depending on many factors.

We’ve had some clients in the past that rely heavily on these tests and use the results extremely heavily.

It’s important not to go overboard with using these tests as a determining factor for hiring somebody or not.

At the end of the day it will be important to see how these tests fit in with your company culture as a whole.

STAYING DIVERSE

Another important factor in hiring for culture is not getting pigeonholed into hiring only the same kinds of personalities.

You want to have dissenting voices and people who are going to interrupt the status quo.

To continue to stay relevant in a fast growing, fast moving industry, you want to be diverse with your hires.

When everybody’s always on the same page and agrees with each other all the time, things can become stale.

Without new ideas you’ll fall to the wayside with some of the more fast thinking companies out in the market.

We recommend that part of a company’s culture be about open communication, new ideas and transparency.

As long as that is part of your culture then you can always hire and look for those types of traits.

IN CONCLUSION

In conclusion hiring for culture is extremely important!

Bad culture and personality hires are one of the number one contributors to high turnover rates.

It’s worth it to do the work to define your company culture and then use it as a guideline to hire the right people.

You will give yourself a major advantage to retaining solid employees and producing great services and products in the marketplace.


Here are some great ways to get started in building your company culture: https://bit.ly/2slTkkZ

Hiring For Agency Talent

If you are any type of agency, hiring isn’t always the easiest thing.

This can be said for a marketing agency, a public relations firm, a media agency, or an ad tech company.

Agencies or agency type companies where business is driven by customers and client customers sometimes struggle with hiring.

Also, agencies where clients are providing some type of creative and/or marketing service, or technology to customers and clients. 

THE RIGHT PEOPLE FOR THE AGENCY WORLD

Many agencies try to hire people without agency experience and tend to have a low success rate.

Agency life tends to have a very certain type of flavor you could say that many people don’t like.

Agency life tends to be fast paced, high pressure, long hours and often more disorganized than working on the client side.

Sometimes people don’t like to work on a variety of clients and brands rather than being in house focusing on one brand.

Many of these seeming drawbacks are actually the things that attract many people to agencies.

If you’re an agency who’s hiring it’s usually a good idea to hire someone with previous agency experience.

There are other reasons to hire someone with agency experience, but the cultural fit and ability to be long term are of key importance.

RESEARCH IS YOUR FRIEND

You may think you know who all of your competitors are, but you want to keep an open mind here.

There may be up to hundreds of other types of businesses out there that would be good places for you to poach from.

Your best bet is going to be recruit somebody from a competing agency who is already working in the job and in the seat.

This is where you’re going to find the best talent.

The people you’re looking for aren’t necessarily the ones coming to your website or your LinkedIn page applying for jobs.

First you’re going to need to spend some time in one way or another to make sure you do the right kind of research.

MAKE A LIST OF SOLID COMPANIES 

You may also have competitors that you know don’t do good work and that would not be good to recruit from.

It is equally as important to know which companies not to poach people from as it is to know who to recruit from.

Once you have a good hit list for yourself then you’ll have some direction about what next steps to take.

You’ll want to make sure you have a productive and effective proactive headhunting strategy.

You may want a recruiting team in house who can dedicate resources to of high volume of qualified candidates.

You may need to hire a recruiting firm who can put in the work and get the opportunity out to the right amount of quality people.

KNOW THE TITLES FOR YOUR NEEDED ROLES

Something to keep in mind is that titles across agencies can often vary greatly.

An Account Services title at one agency may be an Account Director or Account Supervisor or Client Services at another.

Another agency may have Project Manager titles who are not only involved in client relationships, but also with campaign management.

It’s important to understand that the title you are searching for could have a different title coming from a different agency.

Keep an open mind when looking at resumes and don’t write people off just because you think they have the wrong title.

This is an easy way to miss out on good talent because you may be too narrow minded with the positions and titles that you’re looking for.

TESTING FOR HARD AND SOFT SKILLS

Another important aspect is for roles that involve client interactions, pitching for presenting or certain technical requirements.

You want to find a way to have part of your interview process include some way to test people’s soft or hard skills.

It may be some kind of project, case study or presentation that you have them do on a specific topic.

This allows them to demonstrate their skills and for you to see their ability to perform the day-to-day of whatever their job may be.

This avoids having someone tell you they can do something only to find they were able to talk a good talk, but not walk the walk.

This happens way too often, especially with sales rolls.

As sales people are very good at selling their skills and over selling their accomplishments.

You need a way to actually test that or to prove that before you pull the trigger hiring them.

This is the same for anybody who will be managing campaigns, projects or putting together creative briefs.

If they are going to be doing any content writing, interacting with clients or giving presentations you want to test their skills.

A simple task is another way to weed out people who are serious and get a glimpse of how someone will be working in the seat.

HAVING A STRONG COMPENSATION PACKAGE

Salary can be a tricky thing in the agency world as salaries do vary from agency to agency.

This includes total compensation structure like benefits, bonus, equity, etc.

Equity is not very common in the agency world, but some types of bonus usually are.

You likely want to include some kind of bonus structure in your compensation package so that you can stay competitive with other companies.

Benefits programs also go a long way.

Having a strong benefits program is mostly expected now a days.

It’s going to be difficult to attract candidates if your benefits package is not up to speed from an industry standard perspective.

A little bit of research into what other agencies are giving will go along way.

This information is often found on many companies career pages.

We recommend that you have your benefits on your career page as well.

This way candidates who are checking you out can see what your culture is like and what kind of benefits you offer.

NEGOTIATING FAIRLY

It’s important to never come in lowballing a candidate, especially if they’re already working somewhere.

If you’re going to poach people from your competition you have to make it worthwhile.

Leaving a job is risky!

For people to actually make a move it typically has to be a good move for their career as well as a smart monetary decision.

You want to get salary expectations up front so you at least know you’re in the ballpark.

IN CONCLUSION

Hiring as an agency can be tricky and we recommend sticking to hiring only other people with agency experience.

Use some of the tips and tricks in this article to give yourself a competitive advantage to steal some good people from your competition.


Here are some more great tips for recruiting the right talent: https://bit.ly/2fIinLn

Negotiating Salary for Sales And Marketing

Negotiating salary is an area many hiring managers, HR professionals and even many recruiters are not as effective as they would like.

If you spend some time training and developing yourself in this area, you would highly increase your effectiveness in being able to retain top talent.

We have seen and heard many stories about candidates making it all the way to the end of the hiring process and then things fall apart.

Offers get turned down, counter offers get accepted, or something else happens that then has the deal fall apart.

This happens way too often with most companies and as the market is becoming more competitive, the risk of this happening is even greater than usual.

You owe it to yourself to really implement some strategies that will increase your closing rate and at the end of the day increase your bottom line.

KNOW YOUR LOCAL LAWS AROUND SALARY

First and foremost it’s important to know that many states now prohibit you from asking what a candidate’s current salary is.

You want to make sure to check your local laws and see if this is something that you are able to ask or not.

If you are legally able to ask, this can often be very useful.

The you can know where a candidate currently is in their salary in juxtaposition to their salary request or requirements.

If you’re not able to ask this question it’s not the end of the day.

Really what matters is what somebody is asking or what the requirement is.

COMMUNICATING EXPECTATIONS 

What is important is that early on in your process you find out what someone’s salary expectation is.

You want to know early on if someone’s expectation is close or not close to your budget for the role.

Being able to find out early is critical as well as checking in with the candidate throughout the process.

You obviously don’t want to go overboard with this, but you do want to check in periodically to make sure you’re on the same page.

It’s important that you know if their requirement is changing because this can affect how you view their candidacy.

WHEN YOU’RE LEGALLY ABLE TO ASK ABOUT CURRENT SALARY

Asking what someone’s salary is can often give you a lot of information.

Sometimes people are unwilling to give that information for a variety of reasons.

They may feel they’re being underpaid and don’t want their current salary to prevent them from getting what you’re offering.

Maybe they’re being overpaid and don’t want you to be scared away by the fact that they’re willing to take a bit of a pay cut. 

Sometimes they just don’t want to present that information because they feel it’s not fair or relevant.

Sometimes they feel their skills should speak for themselves.

Either way, you want to build a good relationship with people so that you can find out what their concerns are.

Being able to build that kind of trust with people will go along way to you being able to close them effectively when you do present an offer.

NEGOTIATING SALES SALARIES

Marketing and sales people are very much their own breed and there are certain tips that can be taken to negotiate offers effectively for each.

I wouldn’t lump marketing and sales people together as the compensation structures are very different so we will talk about them individually.

When it comes to working with sales people it’s important to get a very clear picture early on about what their expectations are.

Particularly from a compensation structure perspective.

For sales roles there are many ways to structure a deal and it varies a lot from company to company.

Some sales people are very heavy from a salary perspective and extremely light on commission or bonuses.

Some are the other way around and some are in the middle.

It really depends on your industry and your business model.

If your compensation model is very different than what the sales person currently has you may have a nonstarter from the beginning.

You don’t want to waste a lot of time sending someone through an interview process if they won’t be interested in your compensation model.

Also, with sales people it’s a lot more typical to ask what current salary compensation structures.

We also recommend that with sales people you have some way of them proving what their earnings were.

This is a true indicator of their sales effectiveness.

Often times asking if someone can show you a W-2 of their last year’s earnings is acceptable.

This is something you have to feel out on a case to case basis though and it may be something that’s very important for your company.

NEGOTIATING MARKETING SALARIES

Marketing people are being fairly highly sought after in many industries.

It’s extremely important that when you come in to make an offer that you don’t lowball people.

One of the biggest mistakes companies make is coming in with an offer that is too low.

You want to be very sensitive to this as a lowball offer can turn someone who’s very interested in your company off in a major way.

This is a big way companies can lose quality candidates.

Many companies think they can start with a lowball offer as a beginning negotiating price and then work from there.

However they fail to realize that often times a lowball offer can sour things so much and actually leave people insulted.

COMING IN WITH A FAIR OFFER

You want to be hiring people that are going to be excited to come and join your team.

You don’t want someone who feels just OK about an offer or someone who feels like they’re settling.

It’s important that you manage these kinds of expectations correctly.

You need to come in with an offer with the expectation that somebody is very likely going to want to counter and come back.

So it is important to also not come in with your best offer as you want to leave a little bit of wiggle room for negotiation.

If there isn’t room for negotiation, most people aren’t going to feel like they’ve got the best deal. 

Someone who is able to negotiate a little bit and get a little more money is going to feel a lot better than someone who took the first offer.

STAYING IN THE KNOW WITH YOUR CANDIDATES

This is also important to keep in mind as most marketing and sales folks are entertaining multiple offers.

Something else to keep in mind is that you want to be finding out from your candidate if they are interviewing elsewhere.

You want to try to keep yourself in the loop about other offers they might be getting.

This is going to help to inform you about what you need to do for your offer.

INCLUDING YOUR ENTIRE BENEFITS PACKAGE 

Last, but not least, it’s critical that you educate potential employees about your benefits programs.

Often times it’s very easy for a candidate to focus too much on a salary number and not enough on a full benefit package.

This can have them lose sight of what the total compensation package.

This is especially true if there’s bonus programs involved at your company.

It’s up to you to paint a full picture about what the total compensation is going to be.

It’s likely that your benefits packages will add up to hundreds, if not thousands of dollars a month.

You need to clearly communicate your entire benefits package to potential employees so that they can take the whole picture into consideration.

This is going to make a very big difference and go a long way.

CONSIDERING GROWTH POTENTIAL

It’s also important to spell out the true growth potential at your company.

if your company has fast growth and promotes people from within, you want to advertise this with potential candidates.

The millennial generation is especially interested in being able to grow fast, take on more responsibilities and contribute to something.

You want to make sure that you are getting this across to candidates as well.

IN CONCLUSION

There are lot of mistakes that many companies make and in turn lose a lot of candidates late in the the process.

You can avoid making these mistakes by implementing some of these key strategies for hiring marketing and sales people.

It’s really up to you to take some of this advice and put it into a practical application.

You can increase your effectiveness and your close rate when it comes to attracting the best talent.

Remember you’ve likely got a lot of competition out there.

It’s important to stand out from the crowd and have a very strong offer process.

This will get you the best people and at the end of the day increase your bottom line.


Here are some great tips for attracting millennials onto your sales team!

https://bit.ly/2NwiRjS

Hiring Digital Marketing Professionals

This is a blog with tips for hiring marketing and digital marketing professionals for your team.

Marketing is an essential function in any organization.

In today’s digital landscape having a strength for digital and your marketing strategy is more important than ever.

The landscape for hiring digital folks can become daunting or even potentially overwhelming.

There are a lot of types of marketing people out there and it can be difficult to hone in on the right person for your team.

FINDING THE RIGHT PEOPLE IN THE RIGHT MARKETING SEATS

Having the right marketing people in your organization can make or break your opportunity of increasing your marketshare for your service or product.

It’s important to have a solid strategy for hiring marketing people.

This is true whether you have a backfill, a replacement that you need to fill or are hiring a new marketing role within your organization.

PAINTING A CLEAR PICTURE OF YOUR NEED

The first critical step is to make sure that you have a clear picture of the organizational structure of your marketing team.

You want to have a solid organizational structure built out for your entire company.

This way it’s very clear how your marketing team will interact with all the other teams.

If you’ve got someone who has hired marketing people before on your team, this gives you an advantage to lean on this person’s experience a bit.

QUESTIONS TO HELP YOU GET CLEAR ON THE ROLE

It’s important when you’re looking at filling this role to get very clear on what the position will be.

Is it going to focus on a particular market segment?

Or is it more of a general list type role?

Will it be focusing on a specific marketing channel?

Or will it be more of a multi channel marketing role?

You want to have a target market, demographic and geographic region flushed out for your company.

This will help to inform you what you need from a marketing perspective.

DRIVE FOR CONTENT OR DESIGN AND CREATIVE 

Marketing can also go in other directions which are more creative or brand oriented.

Do you need somebody who is content driven or has a strength for design and creative?

If so, this can take you in a different direction as well.

The important part is to get really clear on what the important functions are that you need this person to have.

Are you requiring someone to check multiple boxes and is finding someone like that is realistic?

DETERMINING WHETHER THE NEED IS FOR ONE OR TWO ROLES

You may find that you need two marketing people, depending on the different functions they need to have.

If you have other marketing people on your team then it’s important to see how this person will fit in with those different functions.

Having a well rounded marketing team and strategy is critical and you likely will need more than just one person.

CONSIDERING THE AUDIENCE

Once you get clear about what type of a marketing person you need something else to keep in mind is audience.

Will their experience in this area be important to the audience this role is marketing to?

Do you need somebody with consumer experience?

Or somebody with more B2B experience?

Or maybe doesn’t matter?

WHAT ABOUT YOUR INDUSTRY OR VERTICAL?

The other thing to look at is the industry or vertical you’re in.

Is your industry very niche, which requires someone who understands your product, service and industry to market it effectively?

Often times this is the case, but not always.

Many times industry and vertical experience is translatable. 

Sometimes this is even better than having somebody from the same industry as you get some fresh thinking and perspective.

CREATING A CLEAR JOB DESCRIPTION

It will be important for you to put together a clear job description of the position and a description of the right candidate.

For any job description it’s important that you are addressing both areas.

These include what the required skills are and what the actual job will look like on a day-to-day basis.

Having a solid job description is going to go a long way in attracting the right kind of candidates.

A job description that does not accurately describe what you want can be extremely detrimental.

A poor job description can cause potential candidates to pass right over it because they think it isn’t a fit for them.

It’s important to list your ‘must have’ requirements and your ‘nice to have’ requirements.

Too many must have requirements is going to narrow your pool down too much.

It’s important right off the bat to be clear about what you must have and what would be nice to have.

SPECIFYING THE NEEDED SKILLS FOR THE ROLE

Next, it’s very important to flush out what you need from a soft skills perspective.

We recommend putting the types of soft skills needed on your job description as well what kind of personality traits, cultural traits, etc. you need.

This is good for people to see and will help in the interview process.

This will allow you to structure your interviews in a way that screens people for hard skills as well as for soft skills.

TESTING CANDIDATES’ HARD AND SOFT SKILLS

Lastly, if your position requires some type of technical proficiency, it’s good to find a way to test potential candidates ability to do the job.

This can include things like working with an email automation platform, with some type of CRM system, or even a creative/design/content aspect.

That might mean seeing sample work or having them write up some simple copy or content as an example.

You might need presentation skills, so perhaps having them do a simple presentation.

It might be a technical test with specific questions about using an automation software or CRM software or some other sort of software.

The bottom line is you want to test a candidates skills so you get an idea of what the person will be like when they’re in the seat.

TIME TO GET RECRUITING

Once you have a clear description and a picture of both the hard and soft skills, you can then get to recruiting.

Posting on job boards and on LinkedIn is going to be useful to some degree.

You’ll need to find a way to have a proactive headhunting strategy to go out and find the really solid people who aren’t looking for a job.

You need to find a way to find the people who are never going to find you on their own.

Nine out of ten candidates we place for our clients are coming from what’s known as the passive talent pool.

Again, the people that are not necessarily looking for a job.

This is where you will find the best talent.

You can’t trust nowadays that the right talent will just come to you – you have to go out and find them.

IN CONCLUSION

If you take all of this into account it will make a big difference in your being able to hire the right marketing people for your team.

Often a bad hire is not that the candidate wasn’t right for the job, but because the employer did not adequately flush out their need.

Take the time to get clear on your need, create a clear description and find that passive talent to recruit for your team.


Here are just some skills you can consider for your next digital marketing role:

https://bit.ly/2nVptgv

Hiring Sales And Marketing Talent

Sales graph, markers and pens, torns sheets of paper with the words Marketing, Sales, Sales Growth - Sales and Marketing positions

Today’s blog is about hiring and working with a recruiter to fill your marketing and sales positions.

Every organization has marketing and sales as a critical function of their business operations.

Having talented marketing and sales professionals is critical to your company’s growth and success.

The better your marketing and sales staff, the more successful your company will be.

One major challenge a lot of companies come across is how to attract and retain the best marketing and sales talent.

The best marketing and sales people are highly sought after and are often courted by multiple companies.

It’s important to have a unique, effective and aggressive strategy in order to attract and get these people on board your team.

FINDING TOP TALENT TO FILL YOUR ROLES

Long gone are the days where you can post a job in the classifieds and get people calling.

Job boards like Monster and CareerBuilder are mostly ineffective and are likely going to give you more work.

You will spend hours sifting through unqualified resumes and candidates in order to find maybe one person worth interviewing.

TAPPING INTO PASSIVE TALENT

The truth is that the top talent in the marketplace is not out aggressively looking for a job.

98% of the candidates we place with our clients are not actively and aggressively looking for a position.

This is what’s known as the passive talent market.

An effective talent acquisition strategy must include an effective pathway into speaking to, attracting and nailing down passive talent.

You must find a way to get to the people that are never going to hear about your company unless you proactively reach out to them.

This can be especially challenging with marketing and sales folks.

NARROWING THE POOL

These people tend to be extremely busy, bouncing from project to project with limited time to be applying for jobs, interviewing, etc.

Marketing and sales roles can become more and more nuanced, niched and challenging to fill.

You may require certain specialties, experience, technical capabilities, relationships and may even need to be within a certain geography.

As you add more and more specialized requirements to your position, you are narrowing down the talent pool further and further.

WORKING WITH A RECRUITER LIKE US 

This is where working with a recruiter like us can make a difference.

And when I say a “recruiter like us” I mean a headhunting firm to aggressively go after the best talent in the market.

A firm that will sell the opportunity of your company and the position to the candidates.

This is very different from a recruiting firm that will send you whatever resumes they have on their desk.

That is similar to the results you would get by using a job board.

A true headhunting firm is going to put in the volume and massage their network and the market.

They will be able to drum up the people that you want, particularly people from your competition.

NOT JUST ANY RECRUITER

It’s important to work with the recruiter that has significant experience working within the niche you need.

Marketing has become very nuanced and there’s a lot of different ways and types of marketing.

Take into account your industry, your vertical, your expertise and your products or services.

Find a recruiter who is going to be able to understand the nuances of marketing and sales.

You need them to understand your business and the different facets of marketing that you’re going to need.

Every company needs different strengths or skills depending on different facets of their marketing mix.

You want the recruiter who is able to hone in on the correct niche and the correct type of market for your business.

If you hired a firm that works mostly with technical people, you’d likely get resumes out of left field which would not do you any good.

In fact, it would likely just give you extra work and make your life more difficult.

When looking for an outside recruiter to work with it’s important to find someone who specializes in marketing and sales.

They will know what questions to ask you and the candidates to make the right match for the skill set that you need to fill your open roles.

PERTAINING TO AGENCIES AND AGENCY TALENT

This can be particularly and increasingly true and important if you are some type of agency.

Whether that be a digital marketing, advertising, media, public relations firm or something similar.

There is a unique nature to working with agencies and agency talent.

As an agency, you want the recruiter you hire to know what it takes to recruit agency talent and to understand the agency world.

They will be much more suited to get you the right candidates than someone who doesn’t understand the agency world.

As a talent acquisition or hiring manager the last thing you need is teach someone something as well.

So you don’t want to hire a recruiting firm that you have to teach too much about your type of business.

You want to hire a recruiting firm who already understands your type of business.

You want them already asking the right questions to understand your role, your culture and your company in order to find you the right talent. 

IN CONCLUSION

If you’re looking to hire top marketing and sales talent for your organization it’s critical that you have an aggressive and proactive recruiting strategy.

Sometimes this can be accomplished by having your own in-house recruiting teams.

However if you have a lot of open positions it’s likely your team will easily get overloaded.

There’s a high chance you’ll need to bring in an external recruiter to provide the actual recruiting volume needed to fill your critical roles.

With marketing and sales, it’s important to work with a recruiting firm that specializes in that aspect of your business.

Find a recruiter that pertains to your business.

Whether they specialize in marketing and sales, technical positions, finance and accounting or legal.

The point is to make sure that the recruiting vendors you work with are focused and specialize in the specific areas that you need.

Be wary of any recruiting firm that says we do it all.

Nobody does it all and at least nobody does it all well!

Take these simple tips to create an effective and aggressive planning strategy to hire and retain the best talent in the market.


Here are some qualities and skills to consider when looking for sales and marketing talent: 

https://bit.ly/2OVqDF2

Job Market Tips For Employers And Job Seekers

Lance here today shooting a quick video with tips for success for both Employers and Job Seekers in this hot summer job market.

For Employers:

If you are an Employer looking to add to your team, its important to take a few simple steps to make sure you have a competitive edge in the current candidate driven market.

It’s important that you find a way to have a proactive outbound recruiting strategy. The number one HR complaint across Employers in 2018 is a tremendous lack of quality of resumes coming from online job boards. It’s very likely the right talent for your organization will not find you alone. It’s imperative you have someone on your team headhunting for you – either an internal employee or a qualified headhunting agency.

In the current market, which is certainly candidate driven, it’s critical that your interview process is streamlined and effective. If your process is slow, or unorganized, you really do risk losing great candidates to your competition.

For Job Seekers:

For you job seekers out there, my best advice is to make sure you are doing due diligence when interviewing. There is too much of a tend of “job hopping” starting to show up, and this is a major turn off for 9/10 prospective Employers. Be smart about how you manage your career.

It’s important you do everything you can to stand out in the crowd as well.

-Have an impeccable and well crafted resume,

-exude professionalism in all communications (email, phone, in person, etc.),

-do sufficient prep work for all interviews,

-always let your enthusiasm and excitement for the job come across,

-always follow up with interviewers with a thank you email,

-be on time for everything!

-always be asking yourself the question: How can I stand out in the crowd?

Hopefully you all find this video useful!

Negotiating Salary For Employers And Jobseekers

Two hands shaking over a pen and contract - Salary Negotiation

TIPS FOR NEGOTIATING SALARY 

Today we’re sharing tips for both employers and jobseekers who are considering accepting or negotiating a salary offer.

You should know there are different strategies to take depending on your situation for both employers and jobseekers.

Your strategy depends on if you are negotiating with each other directly or if there is a recruiter who is negotiating on your behalf.

WORKING WITH A RECRUITER

If there is a recruiter in the mix, you need to be clear about how much you trust them to represent and negotiate for both parties.

There are a lot of different recruiters out there and many of them are good at negotiating and many aren’t.

If you’re working with someone, you want to be sure you can trust that they are going to be able to handle both parties interests.

FOR THE JOBSEEKER

If you’re a job seeker and working with a recruiter, you definitely want to take whatever advice that recruiter is giving you.

The recruiter is likely going to have your best interest in mind and do everything they can to negotiate the highest salary possible.

Recruiters’ commissions are going to be based off of your final salary, so it really is in their best interest to negotiate the best possible salary.

The thing to keep in mind is that often by the time you get an offer, the recruiter will have already done some significant negotiating on your end.

Although it may be the first time you’re seeing an offer, it’s likely not the first time that potential employer has been in the negotiation process.

So you want to keep the above in mind as you don’t want to be in a position to over negotiate.

BEING CLEAR, CONCISE AND PREPARED

The last thing that you want to do is go back-and-forth with your prospective employer too many times.

This can make you seem nit-picky and could just annoy and or upset at the situation.

One way to avoid this is when you do an initial review of your offer be sure that you collect any and all questions that you have.

Many jobseekers make the mistake of going back and forth finding concerns and asking questions.

This can get annoying and makes you seem unorganized.

COMMUNICATING SALARY EXPECTATIONS

When working with a recruiter, it’s also in your best interest to be upfront about your current salary.

Many states are now employing laws which make it illegal for recruiters or companies to ask candidates what your current salary is.

The purpose of these laws is to avoid gender discrimination, not so that people can hide their salary and try to get more money.

It will be obvious to the recruiter if you do this.

The truth of the matter is that nine time out of ten, being upfront about your current salary is your best ammunition.

If you’re being underpaid, you can use that as an argument for why you want an increase.

If you aren’t being underpaid you can use your current salary as a basis for a certain percentage of increase.

In other words, it’s better to have a stand off point in your argument for certain salary expectations.

You don’t want to have a certain salary expectation based off of nothing.

Most of the time this is going to help, especially if you are working with a recruiter.

A recruiter will be able to take that information and really frame it with their client to really sell you with your requested salary.

WHAT JOBSEEKERS CAN EXPECT

Also, be sure that you don’t get offended if your first number on the offer is a bit off.

Many companies tend to come in with a lowball offer at first.

This is fairly normal and you want to make sure that you don’t take something like this personally.

This can be a red flag in some situations, but normally it’s just a starting off point knowing that there’s going to be some back-and-forth.

Be professional about it and remind them what your expectations are and what your current salary is.

You can also remind them of your justifications and your logical case for the salary that you are expecting.

The more evidence and logic you’re able to bring to the situation about your salary expectation, the better.

SALARY IS NOT EVERYTHING

You want to make sure you get a clear picture of all the benefits that come with the role you’re negotiating for.

Things like bonuses, health insurance, life insurance, 401(k) and disability should all be considered.

There are many other perks that companies are now instituting like food perks, dry cleaning, vacation, paid days off, remote days, short days in the summer, and the list goes on.

Many of these bonuses, benefits and perks are difficult to monetize, but add up to a lot of money within any given year.

It’s very important that you keep all of this in mind as these things can have a major impact on your overall compensation.

These things also greatly impact the quality of your work and life balance.

So it’s very important that you take it all in a consideration and don’t get too stuck on a salary number.

We’ve seen many candidates get stuck on a salary number and miss out on a great opportunity.

You want to be sure you’re taking the whole picture into account.

FOR THE EMPLOYERS

It’s important that you avoid the aforementioned initial lowball offer.

Be up front with people and let them know what your ranges are early on in the process.

Get expectations from people early on in the process.

You can ask questions as to why they are expecting a certain salary.

Be sure yon’t break the law in your state if you’re not allowed to ask about their current salary.

HAVING A SALARY AND BENEFITS PACKAGE

Have a really well thought-out and put-together benefits document showing as much as possible.

This will show the details of the monetary amount of your benefits package.

A well put together benefits package is really going to help supplement any salary offer that you make.

You’ll be able to justify a lower salary or market salary with candidates if you are also offering a competitive benefits package.

It’s important that you are clear with people throughout the process and you make sure they are clear with you about expectations.

You don’t want to waste your time getting all the way through your interview process with someone that you like, only to have a deal fall apart.

This can happen if you don’t communicate clearly and aren’t in the same ballpark when it comes to compensation.

It’s also not a good idea to come in with your first number as your maximum, unless of course this has been discussed with the candidate beforehand.

Most candidates are expecting to be able to negotiate or pushback on the salary at least once and get a little bit higher than the initial offer.

There is a very important emotional and psychological aspect of people accepting offers.

No one likes to just lay down and accept the first offer.

People want to feel like they pushed back and then someone gave in because they really like them.

The last thing you want is for someone to feel OK about accepting the offer and then to show up on day one feeling just OK having accepted the job.

You want people excited about the role and to feel wanted.

CONCLUSION

These are just a few tips you can take into consideration.

The tips in this blog can go a long way to getting the best offer for yourself and also for the company.


How do you do it ALL? Here is a great list on managing your work-life balance! https://muse.cm/SyV3yC

Interview Tips For Employers

Employer shakes hands with candidate over resume - Interview Tips

Many of our clients come to us seeking advice on how to improve their interview process.

They are seeking the right candidates to find the right employees that will get the job done and last for a long time with their company.

Interviewing is tricky because prospective candidates are often better at interviewing than they are at doing the job that they’re interviewing for.

This is one of the most challenging things to overcome as an employer as you assess how to hire the right person for the role.

THE COSTLY MISTAKE OF BAD HIRING

It can be extremely detrimental to your company to make bad hires.

In fact, this is potentially one of the most costly expenses for any company.

Bad hires can cost the company hundreds of thousands of dollars over a very short period of time.

There are a lot of expenses that go into hiring, firing and having to rehire somebody.

GET VERY CLEAR ABOUT WHAT YOU NEED

The first and most important step in making the right hire is being crystal clear about what it is that you actually need.

Having a clear picture of what you need is absolutely critical because you can not interview precisely without knowing what you need.

Without having a clear place to start, you will waste a lot of time and spin your wheels when it comes to interviewing and hiring the right person.

BACKFILLING POSITIONS

If the position is a backfill position, it may be easier to fill because you’re likely clear about what that person is or isn’t doing.

You may need to adjust the job description slightly if you’re planning to alter the role.

However, in most cases the role won’t change much and you should have a clear picture of what you need.

HAVING A GOOD INTERVIEW SCREENING PROCESS

It is in every employer’s best interest to have an interview process that truly cuts the fat to determine if the person is the right fit.

Once you do have the description clear it’s critical to make a list of at least 10 initial pre-screening questions. 

You want questions that are very specific to the the role you’re hiring for.

Be sure to include some technical questions that have to do with the specific day-to-day requirements and abilities of the role.

Don’t lead the witness with these questions, for example, don’t say are you good at X?

You want to ask for specific examples or ask for how they would react in certain situations.

You also want to review these questions with your team to make sure you’re on the right track.

These initial screening questions will be critical in the early stages of the interview process.

CONSIDERING YOUR COMPANY CULTURE

It’s very important that you flush out what you need from a cultural and personality perspective.

Again, don’t ask candidates if they consider themselves a hard worker – the answer will always be yes.

Instead ask them to tell you about their work ethic or their definition of responsibility.

You can also give a specific scenario and ask how they would react or deal with certain situations.

Hypothetical questions are very good for flushing out how someone would deal with a certain situation.

Next, in the second or third round of your process, there should be a test or a presentation that goes beyond asking questions.

Some clients do a case studies, sample projects or put together proposals.

Think of something that has to do with the duties that the job entails and ask them to give you a sample of what that might be.

The point is to get them to sample the work that the job will entail so you get an actual sense of having them in that role.

This can be extremely useful as you will also be able to compare their work to the work of other candidates in the mix.

If you get really clear about what you need and integrate clear questions as well as some sort of “test,” you will go along way.

INCLUDING YOUR TEAM IN THE HIRING PROCESS

The last important piece is to make sure that you involve the right people from your team in your interview process.

If you have other people at the company doing this or similar jobs, you can have them interview the person as well.

They are the ones in the trenches doing what you already need and will be able to truly tell you if this person can do the job or not.

This can make a big difference and you should lean on your staff and your team to help with hiring as much as possible.

This is also important when hiring for a personality or culture fit, as you want people that will be a match and will work well with the current staff that you have.

CONCLUSION

There are simple steps you can take to make sure you’re making a good hire for any open position you’re looking to add to your team.

Avoiding common mistakes will go along way in avoiding making a bad hire and will save you a lot of money in the long run.

Get clear about the job and position that you need, follow the steps in this blog and you will have success!


Here are some tips on fostering leadership within your company: https://bit.ly/2KS7Dbf


 

Headhunting And Recruiting For Your Team

Magnifying glass over icons of people - Headhunting and Recruiting new employees

This week’s blog is about tips for headhunting and recruiting new employees for your team.

Headhunting and active recruiting is distinct from posting on job boards and in taking incoming resumes.

This article is about the best ways and tips for proactively acquiring top talent, otherwise known as headhunting.

Proactively recruiting or head hunting will give you a competitive edge in acquiring top talent and over your competition.

GET CLEAR ABOUT WHAT YOU NEED

First, for any given position that you’re recruiting for, you need to be 100% clear about what you need for that role.

Clarity is the first place to start and is critical because without it you will never be able to find what you want!

You should sit with your team, stakeholders, mentors or outside resources to write up a good job description for the role.

Before writing a description though, be sure that you know what you need for your team.

What type of experience do you need for the open role?

Do you require somebody with management experience? If so, how many years?

Does this person need to have a specific skill set?

Do they need to be skilled in a particular technology?

The list goes on, but be sure you set out all of the important questions you’ll need to ask to create your ideal candidate.

FINDING THE RIGHT CULTURAL FIT FOR YOUR COMPANY

One thing that is also important is getting clear about what the personality for this person should be.

They will need to be able to be a fit in your company culture.

On a separate note, having a defined company culture is the first step to being able to interview for culture.

Interviewing for culture is a separate topic that we will discuss in another blog.

STAYING FLEXIBLE DURING THE PROCESS

Once you get extremely clear on what you need for your next hire, you’ll be set to succeed and able to focus on exactly what you want.

It’s important to note that you should be open to adjusting this along the way.

When you start interviewing people you may realize there are certain things that you really need and certain things that you don’t.

So you won’t be stuck with this description, but you want to have a very solid and precise place to start from.

ADVERTISING FOR YOUR OPEN POSITIONS

You’re going to want to advertise your job in someway, but I don’t recommend posting on a lot of job boards.

As a recruiting strategy, posting on job boards may become a secondary thing that you do.

You need to have a good career portal on your website.

This is a place that you can direct people to apply into your database so that you can process them as a candidate.

This is very important as potential candidates will need a simple process to follow in order for you to move them through quickly.

HAVING A SMOOTH INTERVIEWING PROCESS

The next point is that you want to have a well flushed out and well thought out interview process.

This will easily move potential candidates through your process and leave them with a good experience of your company.

They have a good experience of your company and they will be left with your brand and your culture when moving through your interview cycle.

You don’t want to ever have any candidate have a bad experience moving through your interview cycle.

KNOW YOUR COMPETITION 

Next, you will likely need to do some research as to where your ideal candidate lives.

It’s likely they are with at least some form of your competition.

You may know about some of your competitors, but it’s likely you don’t know a lot about many of them.

The best place to start is making a list of competitive companies or companies where your ideal person might be.

CREATE A STRONG HEADHUNTING STRATEGY

You can leverage resources like LinkedIn, other social media and Google.

Start to hunt these people down and then you will need to do a lot of outbound contact to reach the right people.

Sometimes the toughest part in having a headhunting strategy is the volume that is required.

Many people who start headhunting think they’ll reach out to 10 ideal candidates and that they will get one of them.

Unfortunately, it never works that way.

Most of the rolls we fill for our clients take us contacting 500 to 1,000 people in order to find a suitable candidate.

You need to be prepared to do the volume of outreach, the work and spend the time to find that right person.

WHEN TO HIRE AN OUTSIDE RECRUITER

If this is something that you can’t do, hire someone to do it for you.

You can hire a solid recruiter who knows your business, knows what they’re doing and can do this work on your behalf.

It’s very important to have a streamlined interview process, especially in today’s candidate driven market.

If your interview process is too long or drawn out, you’re likely to lose candidates to other offers or companies that are moving faster.

You’ve also got to make sure that you can compete from a salary perspective.

CONCLUSION

You need to have a good strategy from start to finish in order to have an effective recruiting or headhunting experience.

You need to start with a clear and concise view of what you need and what you will be looking for.

Only then will you be able to hone in on what is needed.

If this step isn’t followed you could waste a lot of time spinning your wheels with people who aren’t what you really need.

Avoid job boards or at least don’t rely solely on them to produce any real result.

Find out where your talent is, do the legwork and research so you know where to get the people that you need for your team.

Likely they are with your competition, so know your competition.

A concise interview process that flows well will leave candidates with a good experience of your company, brand and culture.

Have a process that moves quickly so that you don’t lose candidates to other companies that move faster.

Lastly, be ready and able to spend the time to put in the sheer volume required to head home effectively.

If this all seems like a lot of work, it is!

That’s why headhunting companies like us exist!

If you ever need extra help feel free to contact us.


Check out this article for some qualities you should look for when seeking new talent for your team: https://read.bi/2N1YvyW


 

Pros And Cons Of Posting On Job Boards

Hand drawing with red marker over generic icons of faces - representing posting on job boards
NAVIGATING JOB BOARD OPTIONS

Today we’re talking about posting on job boards and what posting on a job board is worth.

With so many choices available, there are pros and cons to using job boards and I want to go over some of those here in this post.

If you’re looking to hire talent, there are a lot of options to find potential candidates for open positions within your company.

It may seem overwhelming with so many job board options, artificial intelligence software, recruiters, staffing agencies, and more.

ARE JOB BOARDS WORTH IT?

The question is are companies like Monster, Careerbuilder, Zip Recruiter, Indeed, and other job boards worth spending the money on.

It’s very likely if you are looking to fill open positions at your company that you’re in one of a few different positions.

If you don’t have enough outbound recruiting man power you’re likely trying to find ways to passively attract talent to your company.

Job boards like mentioned above can seem like a good option.

Looking into options, you will notice they can be very expensive and it may be challenging to know which option to choose.

PICKING AND CHOOSING FOR YOUR NEEDS

The most important thing to understand is that job boards are good for certain positions only.

Job boards should be used primarily for low level entry level positions.

Ideally, roles that are administrative or don’t require a lot of specialized education or skills are best for job boards.

Job boards lose their effectiveness the more specialized you get with a position, especially with more senior roles.

Once you start to get to the manager, director, VP or above, job boards are going to become increasingly less effective.

QUANTITY OVER QUALITY

One way or another, with job boards, you’re going to have to allot time to sift through an abundance of resumes.

Job boards will get you a high quantity of resumes, but the quality of those resumes and candidates is going to be very low.

You will likely reject eight or nine out of every 10 resumes that come through for your position.

You or someone on your staff will need to sift through these initial resumes and weed out the ones that are simply junk.

Many job boards today allow candidates to apply to multiple positions at once.

Therefore candidates are not necessarily looking at job descriptions or job requirements.

Often candidates are just blasting their resume out to as many positions as possible hoping that something will stick.

This shotgun affect makes it a headache for anyone who has to sift through hundreds of resumes to find only a few potentials.

For certain roles this can be good, but for many roles it isn’t worth it.

You may not have the staff or the time to go through all these resumes, therefore this may not be a good option for you.

SIFTING THROUGH THE MESS

The other thing to consider is that for the most part, people who are applying on job boards are not currently working.

Candidates without jobs who are actively looking may not be where the best talent tends to lie.

You may want to consider talent that is not actively and aggressively looking for a new position, or maybe not looking at all.

People working effectively for your competition may have the time to find a new position.

With this in mind, you’re likely not going to be tapping into the passive job market.

So you are limiting yourself greatly to the pool of talent that are the active talent.

Don’t get me wrong, there are some good people out there applying on job boards, but they are the exception to the rule.

IS THE COST WORTH THE PAYOFF?

The other tricky aspect with job boards is that you never can know which is the best one for your market.

Unless you are in an extremely specialized field like healthcare, engineering or software development, you won’t know which job board is best.

In these cases, it’s likely you will need memberships with multiple job boards which can get expensive.

The costs for membership and the time to speak to and sift through the high volume of resumes can be costly.

You’re likely better off hiring an internal headhunter or an external headhunting agency like us to do that work on your behalf.

HIRING A RECRUITER

One thing to keep in mind is to never hire a recruiting company that is going to post on job boards on your behalf.

Those are lazy recruiters and if you’re going to hire a recruiter they should be tapping into the passive market mentioned above.

A recruiter is likely going to be slightly more expensive, but you’re going to get much more bang for your buck.

Also your life is going to be a whole lot easier and your experience hiring will be much more streamlined.

IN CONCLUSION

Job boards can work, but they take a lot of work to manage and can end up being very expensive.

I recommend doing a cost-benefit analysis.

You really want to look and see what you’re going to get with a recruiter versus what you would get with the job boards.

You’ll certainly attract better candidates going with the recruiter.

In any case, find and do what works best for you and your business.


Considering building an internal HR team? Here are some things to consider:

https://bit.ly/2JR2u3p


 

Hiring Remote, Partial Remote, and Telecommute Workers

Laptop, mobile phone and coffee cup laying on table with a window view of outside - representing working remotely

Today we’re talking about the pros and cons of hiring remote workers or employing remote or telecommute workers.

It’s important to keep in mind that all businesses are different and this may not work for everyone.

Some businesses are prone to work very well with remote workers while others are not designed to have remote teams.

It’s important to pay attention to this because if your business is a good candidate for remote workers, you can greatly benefit.

If your business is not conducive to hiring remote workers this article may not be relevant to you.

If you want to consider this, you’ll need to see what changes you can make to take advantage of remote workers.

REMOTE WORKERS ARE TRENDING

There is currently a large trend for candidates that are interested in the ability to work remote or partially remote.

Many people nowadays are putting much more emphasis on their work-life balance.

Being able to work remote offers people the flexibility to have their work-life schedule be more balanced.

Many people also work better remote then they do in an office environment.

The office environment can often have many distractions with other coworkers or other things going on.

This of course depends on your office culture, office environment and the type of people that you hire.

Many extremely talented people who are at the top of their field are only interested in working with this flexibility.

THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN HIRING REMOTE

Being open to hiring remote workers opens you up to a segment of the market that you may be missing out on.

If you are thinking of hiring remote workers, you have to consider how that will fit into your existing culture.

If your existing culture is one where everyone is in the office and then you hire someone remote, this could cause friction.

You could produce dissension in the ranks of your employees who might feel left out or jealous if the new person gets to work remote but they don’t.

TRANSITIONING TO HAVING REMOTE WORKERS

If you’re considering taking this on, you want to take inventory on whether your current employees can work remote.

Perhaps you make working remote more like a benefit to be attained if someone reaches certain KPI’s or metrics.

Many sales people are extremely effective working remote.

WHICH POSITIONS WORK BEST REMOTELY

If someone travels a lot and they’re mostly on site with clients, there really is no need to have them in office.

 You can benefit greatly from a rockstar sales person being somewhere else in the country.

Customer service folks and account management people also function very well in a remote capacity.

Believe it or not, accounting folks and financial people can also work very well remote.

You might want to think about having your internal financial people working remote as well.

WHO IS THE RIGHT FIT FOR REMOTE WORK

When hiring remote you should know if they are the kind of personality that’s productive in a remote function.

There are many people who if left to their own devices will not get the work done that needs to get done.

If you have those kind of people working remote you will see a slump in productivity.

Your people should know that their ability to work remote goes hand-in-hand with the results they are on the hook to produce.

In other words working remote should be slated more like a privilege or a benefit that is earned rather than a “right.”

Another trick to hiring a solid remote employee is hiring someone who has been successful working remote in the past.

THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS

There’s also incorporate partial telecommuting where your team is in the office 3-4 days and remote 1-2 days a week.

This model can provide the best of both worlds for you and your employees.

Then you can accomplish the things you need with the team together and have the balance of working remote some days.

This is a very common model that’s being adopted by many companies and is being extremely successful.

This model works if all of your employees are local as you’ll need them in the office together certain days of the week.

RECRUITING REMOTE WORKERS

If you are going to go after remote workers it may be challenging from a recruiting perspective.

Recruiting firms like us are extremely solid resources for being able to tap into other markets for remote work.

Remember, the challenge will be instead of just recruiting in your city you’re going to be recruiting nationwide.

You may even be just recruiting in certain times zones.

Your pool of people to reach out to is going to increase dramatically.

You will need to have a strategy for how to tap into those markets and find the best talent.

Keep in mind that it will likely take a lot of volume, so leaning on a recruiter can be a very valuable resource for tapping into that market.

CONCLUSION

Look at remote and telecommute working as a way to tap into a segment of the market with more great talent.

This is a segment of the market that is growing as more and more people are looking for that work-life balance.

More and more people are looking for the ability to have flexibility around their work schedules.

Many of these types of people can be extremely high producers and will produce better with this type of flexibility.

As managers it’s important for us to focus on hiring the right personalities that can work well autonomously.

This can be more productive for managers also, not having to control and micromanage everybody.

You owe it to yourself to explore this a bit further and see if it’s something that can work for your business.


Here are some great tools for increasing your team’s productivity:

https://bit.ly/2Aj4qrY


 

Recruiting Marketing and Sales Candidates in Seattle

Sunset over the city of Seattle, Washington
RECRUITING IN SEATTLE

Today’s post is about recruiting Marketing, Media, PR and Sales professionals in the Seattle market.

Seattle is currently a fast growing market, especially in the technology space.

Many people think that Seattle is going to be the next Silicon Valley with a lot of technology based companies being started.

We may also see established companies moving and opening up offices in the Seattle area.

A TOUGH MARKET TO FILL

Seattle has challenges from a recruiting perspective and often times will require additional help.

Companies may either use internal recruiting efforts or hire outside firms.

It’s important to know when you need to get extra help for finding specific talent.

The need for talent is extremely high as the market expands and therefore is becoming very competitive.

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION

In order to compete there are certain things that you can do from a recruiting perspective.

Seattle is a great market to offer relocation in the Pacific Northwest and is even attractive from the Midwest.

It is an attractive city and many people, especially the millennial generation, are interested in moving to a city like Seattle.

Seattle offers a lot of outdoor recreation as well as career growth.

It is a smaller market and recruiting only within Seattle can be challenging.

This is another reason to be open to hiring and relocating candidates from other parts of the country.

Portland is a great market to poach people from, as well as Southern California.

The Bay area, Los Angeles, Orange County and San Diego are all great markets to pull talent from, as well as Denver and Chicago.

HIRING REMOTE

If you’re not able to relocate people it’s a good idea to be open to remote workers.

Tapping into the remote work force is great for any company, especially those in smaller markets like Seattle.

Another challenge in Seattle can be the commute due to the geography and traffic in the city.

An already small market can be dropped even further depending on where your company is located and where your talent is located.

This is again another reason to be open to remote or partial remote workers.

If you’re able to find local talent that is partial remote you’re more likely to find folks who would otherwise not be interested.

DEFINE YOUR CULTURE

It’s important to differentiate yourself from your competition.

Your company should have a defined culture with structures and processes put in place that engender the growth of that company. 

You want to be able to communicate that culture and appeal to prospective employees.

Having a strong employer brand is critical now more than ever for attracting the right talent.

Offering benefits like parking passes or other perks will also make it easier for local talent to get to your location.

IN CONCLUSION

Seattle is an excellent market to be in right now.

It’s attracting a lot of talented individuals that you will be able to tap into for your business.

At the same time, more companies are moving to the area and this means more potential competitors for you and your business.

Some of these things can increase your costs, but at the end of the day should also increase your bottom line.

These factors can give you a fighting chance to beating out your competition.

Being open to remote workers and relocating people to your company greatly gives you an advantage for finding good talent.

It’s important to take the necessary steps to have your business compete and your employer brand be one that differentiates you from your competitors.

At the end of the day your employees are what make up your company and it’s critical that you do everything you can to hire and attract the best talent.


Seattle is trending as the decade’s fastest growing city in the US.

Read about it here: https://bit.ly/2km1hSB