Tag Archives: recruiters

Ways To Speed Up The Hiring Process

If you’re currently hiring for your organization in the market right now, one of the things you may have noticed is that some of your competition is beating you to the punch when it comes to hiring a great candidate. Right now many of our clients and many of the companies in our network are losing out on talent simply because their interview process is taking too long. This seems like something so simple, but actually it’s a very major challenge for a lot of organizations. And it’s something that, if you are able to make a difference with, it can make a huge difference for you in hiring the right people.

SPEED MATTERS

In any situation, no matter what you’re doing, when something is highly competitive, speed is always the first place you wanna look. In the stock market, if a stock gets hot and starts to rise, the first ones in to get the stock at a low price make the most profit. In a NASCAR race, when the light turns green, the cars who get off the line faster have a higher chance of winning the race. If you really look, in almost any competitive event, speed plays some sort of major part, if not the major part, when it comes to who wins. So you want to make sure you’re applying this principle to your interview process. So the question is, what are some ways to speed up your hiring process? The key places where you want to start looking are the moment you have a candidate on your radar that seems like a true, viable fit for your position. You need to make sure you’re ready to move fast with that person and make a decision if they’re the right fit. Gone are the days where you move five plus people through your interview process and then get to whittle it down over several weeks to your top two, and then choose between your top two 45+ days later down the road. 90% of the time in this market, you’re not going to have that luxury. You need to be prepared to pull the trigger on a great candidate when they come across your radar.

DON’T MAKE COMPARISONS

So the first thing that we recommend is not getting stuck on the idea that you have to compare a good candidate to somebody else. In truth, there’s not really much benefit to comparing candidates. Has comparing a candidate to another candidate ever really shed light on which one is better? No. You always just like one more. At the end of the day, someone is a good fit for the position or not.

Now, I’m not saying that you should settle on somebody, but the point here is that if you find someone who’s a perfect fit for the role and a rockstar, then don’t wait! Move them through your process as fast as possible. So one key way here to speed up your hiring process is to not be attached to the idea that you need multiple candidates to compare with each other in order to make a decision. Trust yourself, you know what the role requires and what your company requires. Make the hire when you find the right person, whether you’re comparing them to other people or not.

INCLUDE YOUR TEAM IN THE PROCESS

Another key area is you wanna work with your team, anyone who’s involved in the hiring process, and make sure you have a streamlined interview process with clear steps and a clear mechanism for communication with candidates that is going to move things around quickly. In other words, don’t wing it when it comes to the different steps of your interview process, and don’t assume the others on your team are gonna take the same kind of actions and move with the same kind of speed that you do. Before you even begin talking to candidates, you need to have as much of a defined process as possible so that moving people through it is seamless. You could see some of our other blogs about how to construct this interview process.

USE DIFFERENT MEDIUMS FOR INTERVIEWING

Another way to increase the speed of your process is to use different mediums for interviewing. Take advantage of phone calls, video calls, video presentations, Skype meetings, and in person meetings. Figure out the right mix that’s good for your organization, but don’t let the fact that some people may not be able to meet a candidate in person. Again, your interview process needs to move quickly, so use technology to help yourself keep things on a quick pace. This will make a huge difference in keeping things sped up. In today’s hectic and chaotic workforce, sometimes it’s impossible to get your whole staff together to interview somebody. Don’t be attached to what that needs to look like. Be sure to find ways to get creative.

KEEP YOUR PROCESS FAIRLY SIMPLE

In terms of the interview process, we recommend keeping it simple. A phone interview is a good place to start because you can tell a lot about a candidate in a short amount of time without having to coordinate a lot. The second step should almost always be an in person interview or a video interview if schedules don’t align. When you get someone in for an in person interview, make sure to use the time wisely. Have them meet with as many people as possible and get as much of them as possible if you can.

Ideally, you’ll want to do only one more in person, if necessary. Oftentimes one in person is enough with maybe a phone call or a video meeting as a third interview. Try to not have your interview process go beyond three interviews. It’s typically not necessary unless the candidate wants more information or there’s a specific person that they need to speak to about something that may have been missed. Keeping your interview process simple and streamlined like this is gonna go a long way in speeding up your hiring process.

KEEP COMMUNICATION OPEN THROUGHOUT THE PROCESS

One important note is you wanna be checking in with a candidate throughout the process about other companies they may be interviewing with and other offers they may be receiving. Having this information is gonna be critical for you to be able to adapt your interview process, if needed, for a really hot candidate. You may need to move quicker, and being in communication with a candidate around this will also give you an edge in terms of that candidate not just accepting another offer. Oftentimes, if you’re in communication with them about this, they may get another offer and tell that company that they need to wait until they finish with your interview process. Many candidates won’t do this unless you’ve talked with them about it previously. So this is a critical way to not lose somebody while still speeding up your hiring process.

CONCLUSION

These are a few quick tips that, if you implement them, will help to speed your process up majorly, particularly being sure you get organized and give up any attachments that seem like they need to drag things on. Do everything you can to move as fast as possible with candidates in this competitive market. A day can make a difference from you hiring a rockstar, or not, and having them go to your competition instead.

Best of luck!

Want to consider us as your recruiter? We would love to work with you! Contact us for an exploratory call!

The Top Five Best Interview Strategy Tips

It’s critical if you are looking to hire the best talent in the market that you have a solid interview strategy. Your strategy should be designed for you to truly be able to one, determine if the person you’re talking to is the right fit for the position and the role, and two, really sell the potential person on the opportunity of your company.

We’re going to go through the five key pieces you want to make sure are part of your interview strategy. These five pieces aren’t necessarily tied to any part of the interview or stage of the interview process but are more general strategies that you want to make sure you’re employing throughout your interview process where appropriate. Many companies interview process is something that they wing or simply do whatever the hiring managers do. Having a defined and cohesive interview strategy across your company will give you a major competitive edge in hiring and retaining talent.

#5 – BE ORGANIZED, DON’T WING IT!

This leads a little bit into what we just said, but it is so critical you have an organized interview process. That means having the correct systems and structures in place to keep track of candidates, to keep track of their information, and to keep track of feedback, etc. You want to have specific interview questions for specific roles, specific questions that are always asked no matter what the position is, etc. The questions in your interview process need to be laid out and thought of in advance from a strategic perspective, so that you have a clear pathway to hiring the right talent. In other words, don’t wing it! It’s critical that you do the thinking beforehand to ensure that you have an organizational structure that is going to allow you to keep track, organize and powerfully engage with potential candidates.

#4 – BE INTERESTED IN CULTURE

From a culture perspective, it’s critical that throughout the interview process you have a way to one, engage candidates at the culture level and really find out what they’re looking for, what matters to them, what’s important them, etc. You want to make sure you’re hiring people that are going to be a fit for your culture, whatever that might be. You want to make sure they’re going to be a fit for you and you also want to make sure that your company is going to be a fit for them. This is critical for long-term candidate and employee retention. So it’s critical to be engaging candidates with what matters to them, but also making sure you’re sharing and answering any questions about your company’s culture that will really determine if you’re the right fit for them or not. It’s important always to remember that interviews go both ways, some companies look at this too one-sided.

#3 – FIGURE OUT A WAY TO TEST SKILLS

Many interview processes rely too much on asking candidates questions if they can or can’t do something and then taking people at their word. This is the biggest mistake that can be made as many people are very good at interviewing but not necessarily good at doing the job they’re interviewing for. So you have to figure out a way to test skills. This can be done by assigning a project, a case study, asking them to do a presentation for technical roles, and coding and programming projects are extremely useful. So with any role that you have in your company you want to figure out a way to have the candidate actually demonstrate that they can do some aspect or many aspects of the job. This is going to be critical for you to really determine if they have the right kind of skills for your role.

#2 – FIND OUT ABOUT SALARY EARLY ON

Many companies won’t broach salary with a candidate until they’re ready to make them an offer, only to find that there is a huge gap between a candidates expectations and what they’re budgetary constraints are. The negotiation process starts when you first speak with a candidate. You want to find out upfront what the candidates salary expectations are and be very clear with the candidate about what your capabilities are. Throughout the process this is something to check in with. You want to be finding out if the candidate has other offers and get as much information about what the potential salaries on those are offers are, and so on and so forth. Don’t be afraid to be engaged with candidates at the level of money and salary early on and throughout the process. This will mitigate and potentially avoid any surprises when you get to the stage of making an offer. You want making an offer and the negotiation around that offer to be extremely simple and extremely devoid of surprises so that it’s an easy process and it goes the way you want it to go.

#1 – DON’T LEAD THE WITNESS

The questions that you ask candidates in the interview process should not be yes or no questions. Too many interviewers ask yes or no questions about candidates backgrounds and/or give the candidate the answer they want to hear in the question. Something like, “do you have significant experience with digital marketing?” This type of question has the answer in the question and is a yes or no question, so a smart candidate is going to say that they do have that experience and therefore, doesn’t give you a complete answer. So, you want to ask specific questions that tease out a specific kind of response. So instead of the previous question, you would want to ask something like, “tell me about your digital marketing experience.” This is going to force the candidate to dig into their memory bank and their experience bank and give you an answer that is their actual experience. You then can gauge from their answer if they’re experience is a match for what you need. The more detailed and specific you can get with a question the better, as this will tease out what you need. Often times you’ll have to ask for examples of things and this is another important aspect, and is another detail asking for examples.

CONCLUSION

If you take these five tips and put them together as part of your interview strategy, you’re going to have a very powerful edge over many companies out there, as many companies don’t deal with getting this organized. Give yourself that edge and it will pay off in spades. It doesn’t take as much work as it seems like it might, just be sure that you are constantly working on evolving your process.

Need more help on defining your interview process? Go here: https://muse.cm/28O3SBZ

Want to consider us as your recruiter? We would love to work with you! Contact us for an exploratory call!

The Top Five Most Important Recruitment Skills

There are many attributes and skills that go into making a great recruiter. But there are certain skills that one must have if they want to be an excellent recruiter. Most recruiters out there in the world are less than mediocre, and mediocre at best. It’s rare to come across an excellent recruiter who’s a cut above the rest. This is another reason that if you do find a good recruiter, you want to make sure you hang on to them. No recruiter is perfect, so expecting perfection from a recruiter is going to leave you disappointed. Perfection isn’t the point, the point is to be better than average and better than the rest. The point is to stand out in the crowd.

A CUT ABOVE THE REST

This is how we train our recruiters here at Aldebaran Recruiting. We don’t train them to be perfect, we know that we’re not going to find the perfect candidate for every single search. But, we strive to be the best, and we do stand out in the crowd.

#5 – BEING SALES MINDED

A good recruiter is going to have a similar mentality to a good sales person. At the end of the day a recruiter understands that they’re selling an opportunity to a potential candidate, they’re selling a career move, they’re selling the next step in this person’s career. So, it’s critical that this person be able to understand if you’re going to be an above average recruiter, that really at the end of the day you’re a sales person. What better product could you be selling though than an amazing opportunity for someone to take the next step in their career, to not only advance as a professional, but in most cases also increase their earning potential?

So, if you’re afraid of sales, or you don’t like to be a sales person, or you feel like sales people are pushy, or you don’t want to be a pushy sales person, recruiting probably isn’t for you. You’re going to need to be comfortable in creating the opportunity of a role with somebody, and really selling them on the opportunity.

#4 – BEING A NATURAL RELATIONSHIP BUILDER

A good recruiter knows how to build relationships with candidates as well as their clients. A good recruiter knows how to bridge that gap and be the middleman between candidates and clients, and truly build trust and solid relationships in order to broker deals that are long lasting and fruitful for both parties. In other words, you’ve got to be a people person and you’ve got to like people, and you’ve got to know how to deal with different personalities all across the board. If you’re someone who’s easily frustrated, or somebody who doesn’t have patience to deal with people, recruiting most likely isn’t for you. In fact, stay out of human resources in general!

#3 – BEING A CREATIVE THINKING AND PROBLEM SOLVER

When given a position, you’ve got to be a creative thinking type person who’s going to be able to put in the research and the creative thinking to truly source good candidates. Sourcing candidates can often times be the trickiest and most laborious aspect of the recruiting process. And if you aren’t skilled in knowing how to turn over every stone that there is to turn over to find where the right candidates are, you’re not going to come up with a sufficient level of candidates per requisition you work.

So, being someone who is a problem solver and a creative thinker, as well as someone that has the resilience and patient to continue to dig when needed, will go a long way for you being a solid recruiter. If you’re impatient, you easily give up, or you get frustrated when working with a problem, recruiting most likely isn’t for you.

#2 – BEING SOMEONE WHO IS GOOD AT ASKING QUESTIONS

Sometimes in this busy world we are afraid to take up people’s time, and therefore we don’t ask a sufficient amount of questions. A good recruiter asks a sufficient amount of questions both to their clients, to learn about positions and the requirements of the roles and the company themselves, and also asks sufficient questions to candidates to really vet if they’re the correct person for the role.

Asking questions is critical, and it’s important that you’re someone who’s comfortable knowing that asking questions and asking a sufficient amount of questions is what’s going to give you a competitive edge to really get the job done. Only by asking enough questions can you truly learn what you need to learn in order to find the right candidates for your clients. And in the same vain, only by asking the right questions can you truly learn if a candidate is going to be the right candidate for the role. Asking them the right questions, and asking them in the right way is critical to being an excellent recruiter.

#1 – ABILITY TO LISTEN

This is the number one skill that we say is critical for being a recruiter. Your ability to listen leads and feeds all the other previous skills we talked about. The better listener you are, the more sales minded you would be, the better relationship builder you would be, the more creative thinker you’ll be able to be, and the better questions that you’ll ask. Your ability to truly listen to what clients and candidates are saying is going to guide you as a solid recruiter.

Most people don’t listen. We don’t listen to what others say, we listen to the little voice in our head about what other people say. So, if you can get good at the number one and number two here particularly, asking the right questions and then truly listening, you will really come out as an excellent recruiter.

CONCLUSION

If you combine the five skills we’ve talked about here in this blog and you put in the work to consistently get better in these five areas, you can truly be an outstanding recruiter. And if you become an outstanding recruiter, you will be someone who is rare in the market place. There are not a lot of people out there that are able to combine all five of these skills into something that truly is powerful and palpable.

So, study up, always be looking to grow, and we wish you the best!

Want more tips on being the best recruiter? Check it out! https://bit.ly/2Um6bPS

Want to consider us as your recruiter? We would love to work with you! Contact us for an exploratory call!

How To Avoid Hiring The Wrong People For Your Startup

The Rejected One. Concept drawn with marker on transparent wipe board.

Today’s blog is about how to avoid making a bad hire for your startup. The truth is that the majority of the information here could be used for hiring for any company, but we will focus on some specifics for a startup.

A COSTLY MISTAKE

Making a wrong hire or a bad hire for your team or your organization can be one of the most costly mistakes that you make. Not only is it costly from a monetary perspective, but it’s also very costly from a time perspective, which of course translate into dollars. Doing everything you can to avoid hiring the wrong person or making a bad hire is going to be extremely critical if you’re interested in truly growing. Especially as the candidate market becomes tighter and tighter, it’s going to be critical that you make the right decisions and hire the right people.

TIMING IS EVERYTHING

The number one thing that you want to make sure you don’t do, which will help to avoid hiring the wrong people, is to ever rush into making a hire. Now, this needs to be balanced with ensuring that you move as fast as humanly possible with candidates that you do like as the market is very tight. But you need to make sure that you balance moving quickly with also doing your due diligence and ensuring you hire the right person. So always be sure you’re focusing on hiring the right person, not focused on some sort of timeline or deadline. Sometimes clients make the mistake of knowing they need to have someone in the seat by a certain time and will sometimes make a bad hire because they were rushing to meet a deadline or a project timeline. Make sure you have contingencies in place in case you don’t meet your hiring deadline because your focus should be on hiring the right person.

DON’T JUDGE A BOOK BY ITS COVER

Many startups want to hire people with startup experience, so one mistake is to sometimes look at someone’s resume and see that they come across as “jumpy” and then to avoid talking to that person. If you’re in the startup space it’s important to remember that many startup companies do not have longevity, and therefore you want to make sure you’re not reading a book by its cover too much. Many candidates who move from startup to startup have very reasonable and legitimate stories for having shorter stints at companies, and you owe it to yourself to learn whether they look like they could be a potential good candidate for you. What you don’t want to do is miss out on talking to someone who could be good because you judged too much on their resume that they’re jumpy. This will have you miss out on people, and that’s something that you can’t afford to do in a tight market.

GET CLEAR ABOUT WHAT YOU NEED

Make sure that your role is well defined. You want to make sure that you have an organizational and accountability structure for your team and your company, and a clearly defined roadmap for what the growth, responsibilities and accountabilities are. Only with a clearly defined roadmap of accountabilities and responsibilities can you be sure you’re interviewing for the right person. Many times hiring the wrong person comes when you think you need X, but you really need Y, and you hire someone for X only to later find out that you really needed Y. This is no fault of the candidate. This is your fault for not knowing what you needed and then not hiring and interviewing consistent with what you needed. So having clarity about what you need and the type of person that you need is extremely critical. This is a mistake that a lot of startups make as they don’t do the initial legwork and the initial mapping to know where they’re going and what they need to get to where they’re going, so they make a wrong hire.

INTERVIEWING AS AN ART

Another mistake many startups make is with what tends to be younger staff and younger managers. Younger managers are not trained well on how to interview and how to hire for their teams, and are left to their own devices. Interviewing and growing a team really is an art, and in order to interview correctly and hire the right people it makes a tremendous difference to have some actual interview coaching and interview training. This can be done by reading books or having consultants come in and work with your hiring managers. But an organized and efficient interview process is critical for hiring the right people. It’s very easy to get tricked or to not ask the right questions and think you’re making a good hire when in fact you’re not. Your interview process needs to be honed in a way to ensure that you’re hiring the right people.

TESTING FOR SKILLS

You want to also find out a way to somehow test people’s technical or hard skills, whatever that might be. This tends to be easier when it comes to technical roles, but it’s very easily done with marketing or sales roles as well too. The point is to make sure that you’re doing your due diligence on someone’s hard skills, not just taking their word that they have the experience or the hard skills. Taking people’s word on being able to do something is another number one reason companies will make a bad hire. Figure out a way to test, figure out a way to get a work example, whatever that might be.

CONCLUSION

At the end of the day if you take a few of these tips and implement them you can go a long way to avoid making a bad hire or hiring the wrong person for your company. It’s critical that you take these steps because if you’re truly looking to compete at a high level in your industry then you need to be able to make a cut above your competition and hire the right people.

Best of luck!

Need more tips on improving your hiring process? Go here: https://bit.ly/2CjHtWP

Want to consider us as your recruiter? We would love to work with you! Contact us for an exploratory call!

Top Five Questions to Ask Your Headhunter

We’re writing this from the perspective of someone who’s looking to hire a headhunter to help them find some sort of talent for their team. If you’re thinking about hiring a head hunter, it’s likely that you either don’t have the time or resources to conduct searches and sourcing on your own, or you have tried sourcing and searching on your own for candidates and have not come up with anything solid. As an employer or a team manager you should be extremely specific and picky about who you add to your team. It’s so important to find the right match both from the hard and soft skills perspective. You never want to settle on hiring someone that’s not going to be the right person for your team. People are everything at a company and a company can only succeed when it has the right people in the right seats in its company. This is regardless of if you have the best service or best product in the world. It’s not going to happen and your company is not going to do well if you don’t have the right people.

THE VALUE OF HEADHUNTERS

Headhunters can be extremely valuable because they do the massive amount of leg work required to find qualified candidates for your company and for your role. A lot of people think that they can just post a job on a job board or on LinkedIn and the right candidates are going to show up. The truth is this is actually very rare. Yes, sometimes inbound submissions do come that can be a fit. This is mostly when you’re a smaller company with less hiring needs, but as you continue to grow and your hiring needs become more specialized and more frequent, incoming submissions are not going to cut the mustard. And so you have to find a way to have an outbound proactive headhunting and recruiting strategy. You’re going to either need to hire recruiters that are going to work full time internally on your team and your human resources department or you’re going to need to outsource to a headhunter.

FINDING THE RIGHT HEADHUNTER FOR YOUR TEAM

An internal recruiter is very different than an external headhunter, so if you’re looking to hire a headhunter you want to really make sure you ask the right kinds of questions to make sure you hire the right person and the right agency for your team. There are a lot of different recruiting companies out there – big, medium, and small – and recruiting companies tend to specialize in different fields. Technology tends to be a very common type of recruiting firm so you’ll be dealing with positions in the technology space like engineering, software development, programming, and so on. Accounting and finances is another very common type of recruiting specialty to be dealing with positions in the financial and accounting space like CPAs, controllers, CFOs, and things of that nature.

Another common area is marketing and sales recruiters who cover a wide gamut of marketing and sales type positions with a variety of different types of companies which also include creative type positions. There are other types of recruiting firms as well that specialize in more or less areas and it’s one of the first places to start when you’re interviewing a recruiter.

QUESTION #1 – INDUSTRIES

You want to find out and ask your recruiter what industries they recruit in. And by industries I mean the types of companies that they work with. Industry can mean a lot of different things and sometimes people think it’s synonymous with the word vertical. Sometimes it’s not, it’s one of those things that isn’t really well defined in the marketplace in a lot of ways. A lot of people use it in different ways. We recommend asking the recruiter to tell you about the different kinds of companies that they work with. Learning about the kinds of companies they work with will give you an idea whether you fit into their ideal client mold.

QUESTION #2 – ROLES

A solid second question is to ask them about the kinds of positions they fill. Have them tell you some of the more recent positions they have filled at the companies they just told you about. Again, you want to be listening for if the positions they’ve filled are similar to your needs. Don’t worry about getting too caught up in the specifics of this as many positions can be very similar from company to company. You want to be listening for if they’re similar enough to your needs.

QUESTION #3 – FEE STRUCTURE

Another important question is to find out about their fee structure. Are they a retained firm? Are they a contingency firm? Do they have different fee options? Are they a flat fee agency? Are they crowd sourcing? You want to find out what their fee model is and how they charge. Included in this is you’re going to want to find out about their terms and what their guarantee on candidates is as well.

The industry standard for fees is 20%. And that can go much higher depending on the firm you work with. Some retained search firms have fees as high as 40% on their retained searches. You really do get what you pay for in this world and that goes with recruiting sometimes more than ever. Recruiting is an unregulated industry and anybody can put “recruiter” on their Linkedin profile and start recruiting.

QUESTION #4 – PROCESSES

Another important question to ask the recruiter is about their process. What is their sourcing process? What is their interview process? What is the process for when they introduce candidates to you? What happens after they introduce candidates to you? You want to learn what their process is soup to nuts and how hands on they are.

A good full service recruiter is going to be hands on throughout the entire process and particularly is going to help you with offer negotiation and doing counter offer damage control. Many candidates today are getting counter offers and a good recruiter can go a long way to making sure that your offer that gets extended doesn’t get rejected because the candidate gets a counter offer or at least can minimize this. You want to make sure that you have a recruiter that is hands on and experienced throughout the entire recruiting life cycle, not just sourcing or sending you resumes. A resume mill is not as useful as a full cycle recruiter who’s going to be hands on and be your guide throughout the entire process.

QUESTION #5 – WHAT SETS THEM APART?

The last question I would ask a recruiter in this list is to have them tell you what makes them unique from other recruiting firms out there. There are a lot of recruiters out on the market and you want to find out how this recruiter says they differentiate themselves. What they say here will give you a lot of insight into their understanding of the market, their understanding into your type of company and industry and their expertise an a recruiter. It’s a critical question that can tell you a lot about this person and this company and how they will work with you.

LESS IS MORE

Some companies think they can hire multiple headhunters and that will help them find their position better and faster. This is actually a mistake. You don’t want multiple recruiters out there recruiting on your roll. They will be contacting many of the same people and in turn those people will not feel valued by you. At the end of the day you’re not going to get really good quality work out of either of them because there will be too much risk for them to really put the work into your position that is required. It makes sense to have one maybe two maximum recruiters working on a position that you have.

CONCLUSION

These five questions are really great starting points when it comes to interviewing and hiring a headhunter. Since you’ll be working with us recruiters it’s important that you hire the right ones! Good luck!

Want to consider us as your recruiter? We would love to work with you! Contact us for an exploratory call!

The Differences Between Corporate Recruiters and Agency Recruiters

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There is sometimes confusion when talking about recruiters, whether it be somebody who works in a corporate situation or somebody who’s working with an agency. In this case, in the title we’ve used staffing agency, but for the purposes of what we’ll be discussing in this blog, it could also be a full service recruiting agency that isn’t focused on staffing, but is focused on permanent placement or direct hire. One of the key differences is while both of these types of people, a corporate recruiter and an agency recruiter, are recruiters at heart, they’re actually very different in many ways and tend to be very different and distinct types of human beings.

CORPORATE RECRUITERS

At the end of the day, a corporate recruiter or an agency recruiter are focused on the same thing. They’re focused on hiring talent for an organization. One key difference though is that a corporate recruiter sits in house with a particular company and is focused on filling positions only for that company. Corporate recruiters tend to come from a human resources or business background and also will likely have other responsibilities from a human resources perspective. Sometimes it can include things like benefits management, on-boarding, employer branding, and anything else that might support human resources, recruiting and the on-boarding of new employees. They will also only be focused on filling roles for the company that they work for.

SPECIFIC DEPARTMENTS

So a corporate recruiter who works at Apple is going to be focused only on filling roles that Apple has on their roster. And for a large company like Apple, they likely will have corporate recruiters designated for different departments. So you’ll have a corporate recruiter who works specifically on technology roles like engineers and developers and programmers, and you might have another corporate recruiter who’s focused on marketing roles and another corporate recruiter who’s focused on sales roles and another corporate recruiter who’s focused on roles for retail and the retail stores and so on and so forth.

Corporate recruiters tend to be very specialized in the types of roles they work and are obviously specialized with the company that they’re recruiting for as they are in house with that company.

AGENCY RECRUITERS

An agency recruiter is quite the opposite. An agency recruiter typically does not come from a human resources background. Most commonly agency recruiters come from some sort of sales background and they always have some sort of sales component involved with their day to day. An agency recruiter is not going to be dedicated to any single company like the corporate recruiter working at Apple. An agency recruiter is going to be working on a variety of different clients and a variety of different positions. Although agency recruiters do tend to specialize in certain types of roles, the breadth, the scope and scale of the types of positions that they’re going to work on is going to be much larger than a corporate recruiter.

A WIDER SCOPE

An agency recruiter will likely work across multiple geographies, multiple industries, and work with varying companies and therefore will have exposure to a lot of different types of professionals, a lot of different types of technologies and industries and a lot of different types of organizational structures. So in one sense being an agency recruiter can be a bit more challenging because you need to be able to learn how different companies are structured, how different companies work, the cultures of different companies, the personalities of different companies and all the other details that go into recruiting the correct kind of talent for a role. This is much easier for a corporate recruiter, as they have one company to learn and learning that one company well will make their life a lot easier.

COMPENSATION DIFFERENCES

Corporate recruiters and agency recruiters are also compensated very differently. A corporate recruiter is typically a salaried employee. Every now and then you do see these roles with small bonuses or commission plans, but typically they are a very small part of the compensation package. A corporate recruiter is mostly a salaried employee. An agency recruiter is the opposite as typically heavily commission paid with a small salary. So again, structured more like a sales position.

It is typically much more challenging to be successful as an agency recruiter than it is as a corporate recruiter. Most agency recruiters won’t be able to truly cut the mustard for the long term. It takes a special breed of human being to be able to handle both the sales side of being a recruiter along with the long cycles and the constant and ever changing environment of working with multiple clients.

SUPPLEMENTAL MARKETING

A good analogy of the difference between a corporate recruiter and an agency recruiter is what you see in the marketing world. Any brand, again like Apple, has in house marketing people. They have people that are Apple employees who work in their marketing department and work on the Apple brand. But Apple also uses ad agencies to supplement their marketing and those people at those ad agencies have Apple as one of their clients. They are likely working with other brands and other clients that their agency is contracted with on a variety of different projects.

CONCLUSION

So a corporate recruiter and an agency recruiter obviously are going to have very different personalities. Someone who is very sales oriented and likes change will never do well in a corporate recruiting environment, as they’re going to get bored very easy. On the other hand, someone who likes stability and consistency is likely not going to do well in an agency recruiting role. There’s just going to be too much change and uncertainty for them, as they’re someone who’s interested in stability. Corporate agency recruiters tend to also be more driven by money, hence the high earning potential in an agency recruiting job.

Looking to Hire A Recruiter? We would love to work with you! Contact us for an exploratory call!

Five Best Executive Interview Questions

Today’s blog is specific interview questions to ask when hiring for an executive level role. Executive level roles can be defined loosely in different ways, but typically, we like to think of an executive level role as a vice president or above. Depending on the structure of your company, though, this could be a director level or above, again depending on the size and structure of your company.

CHALLENGES WITH HIRING EXECUTIVES

The point is, you should know if you’re hiring for an executive position or not. Hiring for executives can come with its own set of challenges. Executive roles tend to have very common threads with the things that are important about them. Typically an executive level role has a leadership or management responsibility, and this is something that’s important to be able to interview for. An executive level role also will tend to have responsibility over strategy, and oftentimes financials, as well, and will also typically be involved with making high-level decisions that have major business consequences.

NO PARTICULAR ORDER

The following questions are not in any sort of specific order, as the order of importance could depend on what’s more important for you with this particular role. Positions are extremely custom, depending on the company. So there’s no such thing as the five best questions for executives across the board.

QUESTION #1 – OVERCOMING CHALLENGES

One question that is certainly important is to ask the candidate about challenges they’ve had in the past and how they overcame them. You want to ask the question just like that. You want to say, “Tell me about some challenges or difficulties you’ve had in your previous positions, and then tell me how you overcame those.” Asking an open-ended question like this will give you a lot of insight, depending on how the candidate answers. The candidate will be giving you insight into what they consider challenges, first and foremost. Secondly, you’ll get to see how they think and how their brain works when it comes to overcoming those challenges. This is very important when it comes to hiring somebody at an executive level.

QUESTION #2 – DAY TO DAY RESPONSIBILITIES

Another really important question to ask is to have the executive walk you through their day-to-day responsibilities over a particular period of time. You might want to ask about previous roles or just their most recent role, whatever you feel is relevant. The point is that this is going to give you insight into what their day-to-day looks like and what they have been and are responsible for and what they have a track record doing. This is extremely important because you need to be able to map their experience and their ability to do the job. This is a great way to do this. This is a much better question to ask than, “Do you have experience with digital marketing?” That’s too easy to say yes. Have someone walk you through their day-to-day and be as detailed as possible.

QUESTION #3 – LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT

Another great question to ask the candidate is about their leadership and management style. You can first see how they describe themselves as a leader or a manager. Then you can ask them for examples. Maybe an example of how they impacted a winning team, or an example of how they turned around a losing team, or something of that nature. But what you want them to do is to give you examples of how they’ve applied their leadership and management style and what the outcome was.

QUESTION #4 – GAME PLAN

Another critical question that you can ask, and that we recommend with all executive hires as a part of the interview process, is to have that person put together a 30, 60 and 90 day plan of what they’re going to do in their first quarter at the job. You may need to provide them with certain information to do this, but this can be an extremely useful exercise, and will give you some real insight into what to expect when this person comes in on the job. Interviews need to go much further beyond how you feel about a person and how they answer questions. They need to go into and give you as much information on how somebody would actually execute the responsibilities of the job. This is a really great way to do that.

QUESTION #5 – CULTURE

A final critical question that we recommend be involved with all executive hires, and really all hires for that matter, is to talk to them about culture. You should have a defined company culture that includes core values, a mission statement and anything else that truly outlines the culture and personality of your company and of your brand. There should be a discussion as part of the interview around what this is. Allow the candidate to ask questions. Ask them questions. Find out how they feel about your company and your culture. Find out how they see themselves fitting in and how they would enrich and add to that culture. Hiring for culture-fit is one of the most challenging things. Someone who checks all the boxes from a technical perspective that doesn’t fit in from a cultural perspective is never going to last. So it’s important to have this as part of your interview process.

CONCLUSION

The five above questions will give you a ton of insight into someone’s ability to be able to do your job, as well as how they would fit into the company. Combining them with potentially other technical questions and maybe other specifics about the job are going to give you a really powerful insight into whether this person would or would not be a fit for the role. If you’re able to apply these questions across multiple candidates, you’re truly going to be able to tell who’s the best fit. As a side note, we recommend using personality assessments, like the DISC assessment, as a supplemental piece to your interview process. These can help give some other insight into how people would handle the job.

Best of luck!

Looking for more questions to ask? Try these: https://bit.ly/2MRlpt7

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What Is Flat Fee Recruiting and Should You Use It?

This is something we’re seeing more in the market. Many companies and clients are talking about how they want to do a flat fee recruiting structure. And this was part of a larger educational topic when it comes to how recruiting firms are compensated. The traditional compensation model for a recruiting firm is that you pay a percentage of the first year starting salary for whatever the position is, and the salary that’s negotiated in the offer letter. So, the industry standard and the industry average is 20% for permanent placement. The hourly markup for contract workers can be as high as 50 or even 60%. There are many executive search firms out there that charge much higher than 20%. I’ve seen fees as high as 40 and even 50% on permanent placement. So it really depends on what company you go with, but the standard tends to be 20%.

KNOWING THE INDUSTRY AVERAGE

Sometimes, I do see companies that are offering below 20%, even as low as 15%. This is always interesting to me, as being someone who runs a recruiting company, I don’t understand how someone charging 15% would be able to keep a business running. You really do get what you pay for in the market, so working with a company that charges 15%, the odds are that they’re not going to be as good quality as someone who’s charging more toward the industry standard. Here at Aldebaran, we charge between 18-22%, depending on the contractual relationship we put together with clients. 18% is our VIP program and 22% is our standard contingency program. Our fees are lower or higher depending on the level of risk that we’re shouldering and depending on the level of commitment our clients are willing to put into the search with us.

FLAT FEE RECRUITING

A flat fee recruiting model is going to take out of the equation the percentage. So for example, with your traditional recruiting model, a salary of $100,000 with a 20% fee is going to be a $20,000 fee, and that dollar amount can go up and down depending on what the salary is. A flat fee takes the percentage out of the equation and assigns a number no matter the position and no matter the salary. So maybe it’s a number like $15,000, $20,000, or $25,000. Whatever it might be, that number is decided on beforehand to the search, and then regardless of how the search ends and what the person’s salary is, that is the fee that’s paid to the recruiter.

SAVING MONEY?

This is attractive looking to many companies, because they are easier able to budget for recruiting and HR fees when it comes to hiring for particular roles. Oftentimes, they’ll even end up saving money, because they might find someone who’s at a much higher salary, who if they were paying a recruiter on a percentage base, they would have spent more money than the flat fee that they’re paying. So, this can be an attractive model to many companies, because it helps them a lot.

A LOSING DEAL

For a recruiting firm, this is less than ideal, as one, you’re not going to be getting paid the way a traditional recruiting firm gets paid, and therefore, it’s extremely likely that you are going to leave money on the table. Most flat fees are always going to be negotiated below the industry standard and below what the position is really worth working, so it ends up, at the end of the day, being a losing proposition for a recruiting firm.

YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR

So I’ll go back to what I always say, that you get what you pay for. That’s not just in recruiting. That’s everywhere in the world. 99% of the time, you truly do get what you pay for. If you pay discount prices, you get discount products and discount services, and that’s what you need to keep in mind when you are negotiating and signing up with a recruiting firm. You need to ask yourself, “What am I buying here? What level of quality am I looking to buy here?” Recruiting companies run the gamut from horribly ineffective to barely ineffective, and that’s most recruiting firms. Even your average recruiting firm out there is barely effective.

YOU’RE ONLY AS GOOD AS YOUR TALENT

When you find a good recruiting firm, you want to figure out the best way to squeeze as much juice out of that as you can. A good recruiting firm is going to know they’re good, and they’re going to know the value they provide, and they’re likely going to be a little bit more expensive. Hiring good talent should be one of the number one things that you invest in for your business, if not the number one thing. Your talent is everything for your company. Your company will not succeed, no matter how good your product or service is, without the right talent to get it to market, to get it into people’s hands, and to get the word out there.

KNOW THE RISK

So most of the time, a flat fee recruiting model is not going to be worth it, because a recruiting company offering a flat fee recruiting model is likely offering that model to try and compete because their services aren’t up to par to charge a normal price. A flat fee recruiting model is a discounted recruiting model, and you have to remember, again, discounted prices get you discounted products and services, and that’s what you have to expect. Now if you’re okay taking that risk, then go for it, but you have to know that risk is there. Again, I don’t recommend taking that risk with this part of your business. Recruiting and talent acquisition should be the place where you are investing the most money so that you get the best talent.

CONCLUSION

At the end of the day, it’s less about fee structures and more about the recruiting firm. You want to find a recruiting firm that is truly going to represent your business and find you the right talent. Good recruiting firms are needles in a haystack typically, so you need to do your due diligence and your homework to find a good one, and when you find a good one, hang onto them.

We’ve written other blogs about how to hire, interview, and find recruiting companies, and you should check some of those out as well. Good luck!

Looking for more ways to find, hire and retain the best talent? Here’s some more help: https://bit.ly/2MpWFbg

Looking to Hire Superstar Talent? We would love to work with you! Contact us for an exploratory call!

Why Are My Candidates Dropping Out Of The Hiring Process?

This may be a problem that is plaguing your recruiting efforts. If you are experiencing an influx of candidates that begin your interview process but then drop out mid-way or toward the end, this is an extremely frustrating thing to happen. Spending time with people up front to have them only drop out later down the road can seem like a major waste of time and can put a huge drain on any recruiter or hiring manager’s energy when it comes to hiring talent.

A COMPETITIVE MARKET

The market is extremely competitive right now and there is a lot of competition for really solid candidates in the market. The best candidates in the market are also currently working, so this adds another level of competition. Most of the candidates that we are representing are currently working and entertaining multiple offers, as well as counter offers from their current employer. This landscape is making it extremely difficult for companies to hire the right talent and often times results in a lot of time spent upfront that doesn’t turn into anything. This can seem like a waste of time, but it’s also part of how things are right now. The good news is that there are steps that you can take with your hiring process to hedge your bets and to improve this fall off rate.

FIND THE INEFFICIENCIES IN YOUR PROCESS

First and foremost, if you are experiencing a high volume of candidates dropping out of your hiring process, it’s likely there are several inefficiencies built into your process that are turning candidates off. And if you’re not turning candidates off, then you’re just not doing a good job of turning them on. It’s even more important in this market to turn a candidate on than to simply not turn them off. Unfortunately, most companies’ hiring processes turns candidates off, some leave candidates neutral, and very few are turning candidates on. Those who are able to excite candidates about their company and get them really engaged in the opportunity and have the process be smooth and effective are the ones who are getting the best talent.

INCREASING YOUR ACQUISITION RATE

So what are some of the things that you can do to increase your acquisition rate here? The first place to start is to look at what some of the common mistakes are. First and foremost, if you’re having candidates dropping out of your hiring process, it’s likely one major culprit is that you are unorganized when it comes to scheduling interviews and providing feedback. You are either unorganized or you are too slow here, or a combination of both. Candidates are getting communication and are likely being headhunted by multiple companies, so you’ve got to have an organized process and you’ve got to move fast. Remember that your interview process is the first experience that a candidate has with your company and is going to give them a lot of insight into how your company works. You want human resources and recruiting to be acting consistent with your core values and your company’s employer brand. So it’s critical that this process is extremely organized, detail oriented and provides a concierge service.

WINING AND DINING YOUR CANDIDATES

You want candidates to experience being truly valued and taken care of as they go through your interview process. It’s critical that they feel important and even feel special. This type of “wining and dining” goes a long way. That’s not to say you need to take candidates out to eat or anything like that, but providing a level of detail that gives them a concierge service is going to go a very long way and much of your competition is not doing that.

HAVING A FAST MOVING PROCESS

The other thing is that your process needs to move quickly. Often times human resources has a hard time getting feedback from hiring managers or other people involved in the hiring process. If this is an issue within your company, you need to call a meeting right away and get all the hiring managers on the same page when it comes to feedback. Many of our clients have issues when it comes to getting feedback from hiring managers and this is something that we see a lot of human resources professionals tolerate. The toleration of lazy or slow hiring managers who are too busy to get back to you is going to be one of the biggest issues you will have when it comes to acquiring talent. You need to get hiring managers on the same page, and you need to whip them into shape, so that they are on your team and they are clear about the importance of detailed feedback. Along those lines, hiring managers need to be trained on how to interview and how to represent the company to potential candidates. Oftentimes, human resources does a good job of keeping things organized, but then the hiring managers, who are not trained in interviewing and have never been trained in interviewing, blow it when it comes to doing the interviews and turn candidates off. You’ve got to have your hiring managers and your leadership team trained to be effective interviewers who represent your company effectively.

INTERVIEWS GO BOTH WAYS

Dealing with what we’ve talked about so far in this blog is going to go an extremely long way to you stopping the bleeding of having candidates dropping out of your hiring process. It’s important that your hiring process also communicates things about the culture and about the company itself. You can’t have an interview be all one-sided about you asking candidates about their experience and whatnot. In a competitive market, candidates are feeling different companies out and so the interview truly is going both ways. You’ve got to give your candidates an opportunity to learn about you and learn about what you do. You want them to really get a sense for your culture and what it’s like to work for you, what makes you different, etc. This is critical and is the best opportunity for you to really turn a candidate on to your company and your organization and the position. Again, hiring managers need to be up to speed when it comes to this part of the hiring process, and it needs to be a structured part of your interview process.

KEEPING A PULSE ALONG THE WAY

It’s important along the way in your interview process as well, to be checking in with candidates about where they are in the hiring process with any other companies. This will also allow you to gauge how much effort and speed needs to go into an individual person, depending on your level of interest in them. Keeping a pulse on this is going to be critical and also goes a long way to you building a relationship with that candidate, which is also going to keep them in your process.

CONCLUSION

These are a few tips that will go a long way to keeping candidates in your hiring process. There are many other things that you can do and there are a lot of ways that this blog could be broken down to go into detail on how to implement some of these things. If you’re interested in more of that, you should contact us about some of our coaching workshops.

Best of luck!

Looking for more ways to find, hire and retain the best talent? Here’s some more help: https://bit.ly/2MpWFbg

Looking to Hire Superstar Talent? We would love to work with you! Contact us for an exploratory call!

What Is Crowdsourced Recruitment?

This is a very common question we are hearing nowadays and it is a type of recruiting that is springing up around the market. There are a few different companies that are jumping on this bandwagon trying to find a new angle to recruit from. Crowdsource recruiting is very reminiscent of some websites like Upwork or Elance where companies are using technology to pool resources together and make those resources easily available for people and companies to consume.

CHEAPER RECRUITING?

The idea behind crowdsourced recruiting is to make recruiting cheaper and more effective for companies. The problem is in most cases this does not happen. Many companies have tried to figure out how to replace headhunters, that is human being headhunters. Job boards are all designed to try to replace human headhunters and crowdsourced recruiting marketplaces are also designed to try to replace job boards and human being headhunters. There are a lot of reasons why one might be attracted to a crowdsource recruiting marketplace.

The way a crowdsource recruiting marketplace works is similar to a job board. Unlike a job board though, a company will post their position on the crowdsource marketplace and there will be a variety of recruiters that will then be able to work that position and attempt to submit candidates. The idea here is that more recruiters working on your job is better, but in our experience of over 20 years in business, this is not the case. The last thing you need is to have a whole bunch of recruiters that you have no relationship with who don’t truly understand your business and don’t truly understand your requirements out there talking to people about your position and your company.

YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR

You run the risk of not only being misrepresented, but you also run the risk of having people being contacted by multiple recruiters which makes your company seem desperate in the marketplace and also unorganized. Similar to working with an actual human-run executive search firm, you want to limit the amount of recruiters you work with to one or maybe two highly effective headhunters. By limiting this you protect yourself from overexposure and you protect yourself from the risk of having people talk about you, your company and your position who don’t really know you.

Effective headhunting and recruiting is all about relationships and the best headhunters and recruiters out there are the ones who are skilled at building relationships with their clients. The best recruiters understand their clients, their culture, the type of personality fits and the nuances of what types of talent that company wants to see. The other thing to keep in mind is that sourcing resonates as a very small part of the recruiting process.

RECRUITING IS MORE THAN SOURCING

A true headhunter is going to be able to heavily vet candidates before you see them on your behalf, manage logistics, interview schedule’s, run references for you and handle offering negotiations. In over our 20 years in business we have been the major catalysts for countless deals getting done with our clients that would have never happened without our intervention and negotiating on both parties behalves. Having a recruiter who is a good negotiator working on your behalf is worth a million dollars.

So although crowdsource recruiting can seem attractive at first sight, and it seems like, “Oh wow, if I get more recruiters working on my job, that’s going to be better.” This is not the case. One has to remember that most recruiters out there on the market, whether they’re a recruiting firm or a recruiting contractor, are not that good at what they do. Recruiting is a very challenging industry and finding a good recruiter is way less common than finding a mediocre or less than average recruiter. Unfortunately, given the unregulated nature of the recruiting industry, most recruiters out there are at best average and are going to produce a mediocre result.

GOOD RECRUITERS ARE A VALUABLE RESOURCE

That’s why when you find a good recruiting firm, you want to hang onto them and use them whenever needed and have them be your go-to. This will allow you to be organized and will protect you in many ways. So far technology has not found a way to replace the value of a headhunter. Everything that we mentioned here are the valuable things that a recruiter brings to the table are very far from being replaced by any kind of artificial intelligence, any kind of recruitment marketplace or crowdsourcing or job boards. All of these other technologies are a small piece of the puzzle and really aren’t even able to do the small piece of the puzzle that they’re designed to do in a way that would be as effective as a really good headhunter.

So before you sign up for one of these crowdsourced job boards, you want to remember you get what you paid for, perhaps you may be able to save a few percentage points on the fee, but is it really going to be worth it? Do you really think you’re going to get the most quality candidates? Are you going to have a dedicated human being for you and your business who’s going to learn what you do, learn how you work and learn your business in order to be a true business partner? These are the things you need to ask yourself.

CONCLUSION

There really is no substitute for an excellent headhunter and we recommend that if you need outside recruiting help, that you find a recruiting firm that can be your partner or hire internal people who can recruit for you. This is still the best strategy and we don’t see anytime soon where crowdsourcing or job boards or other technologies are going to replace that. Good luck.

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Is Posting Jobs On LinkedIn Worth It?

This is a very common question that we get and something that we wanted to write a blog about because there’s not an easy answer to this question. We’re going to focus more on LinkedIn because LinkedIn is certainly unique from other job boards.

LinkedIn has, over the past decade, become a predominant figure in the recruiting and job seeking world. Therefore, there certainly are a high level of candidates and jobs available on LinkedIn. LinkedIn has made a lot of money out of monetizing their social network to connect job seekers and employers. LinkedIn is similar to other job boards in the sense that companies can pay a fee to post their jobs on LinkedIn, and then potential job seekers can easily submit an application for the job. What makes LinkedIn unique is that it is also built around a social network. Therefore, it has a centralized network of millions of people. LinkedIn’s network of candidates and job seekers in one place certainly is superior to the other job boards out there.

DETERMINE THE TYPE OF JOBS YOU’RE POSTING

So, is posting jobs on LinkedIn worth it? There is no simple answer to this question. As my question in response is always going to be: What kind of jobs are we talking about? Some jobs are more effective to post on LinkedIn than others. It really widely varies. It also depends on the geography of your company and other factors, including your company’s social presence, employer brand, industry, and type of business.

In general, LinkedIn can be a valuable tool to both promote your employer brand, your company, and post jobs. The question of, is it worth it or not, is not a simple one. It is going to need to be measured on a case to case basis. Posting jobs on LinkedIn needs to be treated like any other marketing channel where ROI, or return on investment, needs to be tracked over time in order to really decide if it’s worth it?

QUALITY OR QUANTITY?

There is a certain amount of money you will spend posting jobs. You’ll have to come up with a decision yourself if LinkedIn provides the adequate amount of candidates for you to justify using the service. One thing many of our clients complain about when it comes to posting jobs on LinkedIn is the same complaint we hear when it comes to posting on other job boards. That is that LinkedIn will attract a high volume of applicants and resumes, but the vast majority of them, 98% or higher, will be poor quality.

It’s very likely you will end up having someone on your team spend a lot of time looking at resumes that are not a good fit for your job. This can end up being a time sucker as well, and this needs to be factored into your return on investment. The quality of resumes that LinkedIn brings in will have a lot to do with your industry, and/or the type of job you’re looking for. Technical roles tend to not be the best roles to post on LinkedIn, although, they can be successful in certain markets.

TYPES OF ROLES

Marketing and Sales jobs tend to attract more people on LinkedIn, but depending how specific or niche your needs are, it may be challenging to hone in on the right people. One critical thing to remember at the end of the day is that with LinkedIn, just like other job boards, you’re only going to be attracting active talent. You will only be attracting people who are out there looking for a job. This is mostly going to be people that are currently unemployed, are freelancers, are in between jobs for some other reason, and a very small portion of them will be people with jobs who are looking to make a move.

ACTIVE VS. PASSIVE JOB MARKET

The point is that at the end of the day, just about 99% of the people who apply are active job seekers. They have to be active, given they are applying for your job. The active job market is just the tip of the iceberg and tends to not be where the best talent is. That isn’t to say that there isn’t good talent in the active talent pool because there is, but they are more rare than the less than average talent in the active pool. Where the real good talent lies is in the passive talent pool. LinkedIn is not able to tap into that passive talent pool. So far, no technology has been able to take the place of what a human being recruiter can do when it comes to networking and leveraging relationships to tap into the passive talent market.

The passive talent market is where you find the best talent, especially when you can get targeted to go after your competition, or certain people, or certain industry leaders. If you are a high growth company and you are serious about hiring the best talent in the market, you must have a proactive head hunting and recruiting strategy to tap into the passive talent market.

FINDING PASSIVE TALENT

With that said, LinkedIn and other job boards will always be supplemental. Are they good as supplements? Yes, they are good as supplements. But they should never be relied on to find the best talent in the market. Again, if you are interested in hiring the best talent in the market, you must find a way to tap into the passive talent pool. You have to either hire a recruiter on your team to do that head hunting, or you need to apply your outside vendors to do that work on your behalf.

Head hunting into the passive talent market takes massive volume and an attention to detail. You need to make sure you have someone on your side doing this. This is the only way to do this.

CONCLUSION

Is posting jobs on LinkedIn worth it? By itself? Never. Job boards and LinkedIn will never be worth it on their own. They are worth it as supplements to their outbound proactive recruiting strategy that’s going to tap into the passive talent market.

We hope this blog was useful. Good luck!

Here are a few more tips from LinkedIn on posting: https://bit.ly/2z61ezr

Looking to Hire Superstar Talent? We would love to work with you! Contact us for an exploratory call!

What Is An Executive Search Firm?

This is a question that commonly comes up. People ask, what is an executive search firm, or even what is an executive recruiter, or what is a recruiting agency? Or sometimes different versions of this question. The bottom line is people are sometimes, and often times, not familiar with what an executive search firm does, or an executive recruiting firm does. So, the purpose of this blog is to give a little bit of insight into what an executive search firm is, how executive search firms work, and why they are valuable.

Here at Aldebaran Recruiting, we really try to set ourselves apart from other executive search firms out there in terms of providing a high level of customer service, and quality versus quantity. Most executive search firms, though, serve a similar purpose. The easiest analogy of an executive search firm is to think of it as a consulting firm. While there are many different types of consulting firms out there, you can find consulting firms for marketing, you can find consulting firms to help your business with sales, you can find consulting firms to help your business with accounting or finance, or even legal matters.

HUMAN RESOURCES AND CONSULTANTS

An executive search firm is a consulting firm that basically helps in the human resources department specifically with recruiting. There are a lot of other types of human resource consultants out there as well. Many executive search firms like here at Aldebaran Recruiting offer other human resource workshops and resources, as well. But from an executive search perspective, this is referring to recruiting or head hunting. And this recruiting or head hunting is typically done at the executive level, and we would define the executive level here at Aldebaran as director level and above. Many companies may define the executive level in different ways, maybe VP and above, or maybe someone who’s considered an executive in a different fashion. This definition isn’t as important.

Most executive recruiting firms will recruit positions outside of the executive suite, as well. So, this can include managers, and even entry level positions. Here at Aldebaran Recruiting, we do work a lot of mid-level, manager level and director level positions for clients as this type of talent tends to be very sought after in the market, and difficult to recruit.

WHY HIRE AN EXECUTIVE SEARCH FIRM?

You could be in many different positions that would require you to hire an executive search firm, or where it may benefit you greatly. For one, you might own a small or medium size business, and you don’t have a true human resources department. If you don’t have a true human resources department, and no internal recruiting function, you may reach a tipping point. Your own networks and posting on job boards may no longer be sufficient for you to be able to attract the right kind of talent for open positions to grow your company. If this is the case, you’re left with two options. One, either hire someone internally to join your team who can recruit for you as a full-time recruiter, or hire an executive recruiting firm to outsource your recruiting needs to.

This is something that we’ve written about in the past in terms hiring a recruiter, or how to hire a recruiter, and you should check out some of those other blogs as well.

Another reason might be that you have an internal human resources department, or an internal recruiting team, and they might be overloaded. So, they may not be able to handle all of the open requisitions that you have, and at this point, you may need to pick some of your difficult positions, and outsource these to an executive search firm. You would then be using the executive search firm as a supplement to your internal department.

Another scenario where companies hire executive search firms is if they have a confidential role, or a position that they need to keep hush hush that needs to get filled. Sometimes it’s because there’s work on a new client, or a new part of the business that wants to be kept confidential. Sometimes there’s somebody that you need to replace in your organization, and you need to find their replacement before you let them go, and this needs to be kept confidential for obvious reasons. Executive search firms tend to be very good at keeping searches confidential, and keeping things under the radar so that you don’t worry about any unnecessary exposure.

THINGS TO KEEP IN MIND

These are the most common reasons for needing to hire an executive search firm. When it comes to hiring an executive search firm, there are a lot of things that you need to keep in mind. Again, we recommend looking at some of our other blog posts that have talked about the things to look out for when hiring your recruiter, and how to hire a recruiter. In general, it always is good to find a recruiting firm that is smart. You want to interview different recruiting firms, and find someone that you feel is going to truly be able to understand your company and your business.

INDUSTRY EXPERIENCE

Someone who can understand your company and understand your business is much more important than someone that has “industry experience.” Industry experience is only as good as someone who’s able to truly understand your business. So, don’t get too caught up on if someone has worked the particular type of position or industry. While this is important, and this is something that you should be looking into, what you want to be paying more attention to is, is this recruiter smart, and are they going to actually focus in on what I need for my team? This is the most critical thing.

CONCLUSION

In summary, an executive search firm is a consulting company that is going to help you and your organization from the recruiting or head hunting perspective. Typically, this recruiting or head hunting is going to be happening at the director level or above, but many times it’s happening at the manager level, and even entry level type positions. There are many different types of executive search firms out there, and we’ve talked about some of these in some previous blogs.

If you’re thinking of hiring an executive search firm, you want to be sure to educate yourself on the different types of companies, the different types of models, and be sure you have some good questions to interview some recruiters so that you hire the right person. We always recommend hiring only one executive search firm, maybe two maximum. Some companies will use several recruiting firms for their needs, and this is typically not a good idea. Good luck out there, and we hope you hire the best talent in the market.

Here are some more great tips to consider when hiring a recruiter: https://bit.ly/2REt7eY

Looking to Hire Superstar Talent? We would love to work with you! Contact us for an exploratory call!

The Five Best Practices for Recruiting

We’re going to cover here the top five things that we say are critical for a recruiters or headhunters to be highly successful in acquiring and retaining the top talent in the market. The skills that we’re going to talk about will apply to anyone who’s recruiting or headhunting for any type of position. In other words, these things are universal. They will apply to everybody in all cases. If you’re able to apply all five of these points, you’re going to give yourself a major edge when it comes to being an effective recruiter. If you’re able to implement only one of them, you may give yourself a slight edge, but when they’re all combined together there is an extremely potent strategy that comes into play.

Number five is organization.

It’s critical as a recruiter that you are organized to be productive and successful. In other words, you need to have a quality candidate tracking system, systems for tracking interviews, data, clients, communication, etc. You need to look at all the different aspects of the recruiting process and be sure that you have an organizational system in place to track and keep place of these things. One of the most important things to be organized around, which is a thing that many recruiters get wrong, is to be organized around your results. You want to track all of your activity and outcomes, so that you have a clear scoreboard and a clear picture of your performance. Only when you have a clear picture of the facts of your performance are you able to make tweaks in order to increase your performance.

Number four is tenacity.

A good recruiter is someone who’s not easily frustrated, and is someone who never gives up and does what they have to do to get the job done. Again this is applicable for any recruiter, whether it’s somebody on the client side or somebody at an agency. If you’re easily frustrated or easily thwarted or think things are hard, this is going to be very detrimental for a recruiter. A successful recruiter has tenacity in the sense that they never give up, they’re not easily frustrated, and they are constantly looking and thinking in creative ways to produce an outcome. You’ve gotta be a creative thinker who can think outside the box and is able to come up with creative ways to solve problems. All while having fun! If you’re not having fun and you’re easily frustrated or thwarted, recruiting may not be the right field for you.

Number three is integrity.

It’s critical that you build a foundation of integrity both for your clients and your candidates whether you’re on the client side or the agency side of your employer’s brand. There is way too much of what’s known as the resume black hole in the market. The resume black hole is the black hole that resumes go into when people apply for positions and then never hear anything back. Part of your organizational structure should include that all candidates who apply get feedback, and get feedback at every step throughout the process. Nobody should ever be left hanging. This also includes how you communicate with your clients if you’re on the agency side. You need to have structures in place to be sure that you’re communicating with your clients and keeping them up to date on what’s happening with their searches. Even if you aren’t producing the result you want to produce, that is the update that needs to be getting to your clients. In order to be a successful recruiter, you need to build a track record of reliability. If you’re known as someone who is reliable and who can be counted on, this is going to go a long way in you being successful as a recruiter.

Number two is to be a good asker of questions.

In other words, you have to be somebody who knows how to ask the right questions and who knows what questions to ask and when, and isn’t afraid to ask a lot of questions. A good recruiter will ask a lot of questions up front about the open position. A good recruiter knows that the more they know and understand the position, the higher the likelihood is that they will find someone who is a match for it quickly. Many people are afraid to ask questions because they think that they’re supposed to know everything and they’re afraid that people will think that they’re unqualified or don’t know something because they’re asking questions. The opposite is true! You need to be able to ask questions and ask a lot of questions, so that you have a clear understanding of what’s going on. When you’re able to ask the right questions, this will give you a huge edge when it comes to being effective. So learn to love to ask questions, learn the right questions to ask, and make sure you ask them no matter what.

The number one trait is the ability to listen effectively.

A good recruiter is able to listen effectively in all situations. Whether that is when you’re intaking a new position, interviewing candidates or getting candidate feedback. These are all the things that you need to be able to be a good listener. Listening is a huge trait as it takes actually being able to be present with the people that you’re speaking with and asking questions to. A solid recruiter is able to ask the right questions but then also listens in the right way. So you want to practice in all your conversations with people listening intently to what people are actually saying. The problem is we tend to listen to things, not what people are saying, but to the little voice in our head. This tends to be our big downfall! You’ve gotta really train yourself to listen to what other people are saying and fully understanding their answers to your questions. The better you’re able to listen and the more keenly you’re able to listen, the more you will be able to get the correct information from clients, candidates, etc., and to be able to make the right matches.

In Conclusion:

These are the five traits that we say make a rockstar recruiter! You can also call these Five Best Practices. Individually each one is powerful, but when put together you get a potent combination that will make you a rockstar recruiter. Most recruiters out there are lacking in more than one of these and that is why most recruiters end up being mediocre. Recruiting truly is an art, and if you’re able to combine these skills and develop yourself in these areas, you’ll end up being a rockstar who will be an undeniable asset to any organization when it comes to hiring.

Want to find out more about becoming the best recruiter? Go here! https://bit.ly/2KAx3Xc

Looking to Hire Superstar Talent? We would love to work with you!


How To Write Interview Questions

Writing interview questions and doing the prep work regarding how to interview for any particular position is some of the most critical prep work when it comes to hiring the right talent for your role. Most bad hires are a function of one of a few different things. Either you have a bad set of interview questions that don’t flesh out whether or not the candidate is the right fit, or you have an interviewer who doesn’t know how to ask the right questions, or how to read responses from a prospective employees.

Interviewing truly is an art, and it is an art that most people don’t take seriously enough. Most hiring managers, or anybody in a hiring position, don’t have any formal interview training. Therefore, you end up with a lot of people in management positions who are interviewing, and basically winging it. This can cause a lot of problems, both with hiring individuals in that team, but also organizationally across your company. If you have multiple department heads conducting completely different types of interviews, you’re going to run into trouble when it comes to hiring a cohesive team that is all going to fit together.

CRAFTING YOUR INTERVIEW QUESTIONS

So, that is a topic really for another blog, when it comes to the best way to set up your organization to interview and hire effectively. And that will have to be something that we cover in a different post. For now, we want to focus on tips on how to write and craft your interview questions in order to be the most effective. Making a bad hire is one of the most costly mistakes you could make for your company and for your team. On average, a bad hire is going to cost you about $20,000. That is a major expense that needs to be avoided at all costs.

The key to writing good interview questions starts with having a solid job description. I’m not going to go into a lot of detail here on how to write job descriptions, as we have many previous posts on writing job descriptions. So, if you don’t have a solid job description for your position yet, that is where you want to start before you even think about what kinds of interview questions you’re going to have. Check out some of our previous blogs on how to write job descriptions for specific positions. If you don’t see your specific position, don’t worry, the posts tend to be very universal in many aspects, so take as much information as you can and write up a solid job description.

CREATING A FOUNDATION FOR YOUR INTERVIEW QUESTIONS

Once you have a solid job description, you’re going to want to use that job description as a foundation to craft your interview questions. The must haves and the nice to haves, as well as the position description, are going to be the key pieces that you’re going to want to craft your interview questions around. It’s important to remember that an interview goes both ways, so you want part of your interview to be an opportunity for the candidate to ask questions, and to learn and gain information about the company, the culture, et cetera.

You’ll want to make sure too that you have part of your interview as an introduction to your company. In other words, an introduction to what you do, your products and/or your services, how you’re different in the market, as well as topics like what your culture is like, what some of your benefits look like, what are some of the perks, and why someone would want to work for you.

ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS

These selling points are all extremely critical when it comes to the interview process, so it’s important that you have those worked in around your interview questions themselves. Now, when it comes to crafting interview questions, the most important thing is that your questions don’t lead the witness. I say this a lot in other blogs, and in other places that I’m writing and speaking, that the biggest mistake interviewers make is they lead the witness. In other words, they ask questions that are too easy to answer yes or no to, or they ask questions that contain the answer within the question.

So, asking somebody something like, “Do you have a lot of experience working in digital marketing social media campaigns.” Someone’s easily going to say, “Yes, I have a lot of experience working in digital social media marketing campaigns.” You’ve got to craft your questions in a way that leaves things open ended, so that the answer is going to be one where your candidate has to answer from their experience and their background so that you get a clear picture of their experience.

So, a better question is something like, “Tell me about the last five projects that you worked on, and what those looked like on a day to day basis for you.” And then even going further into saying, “Great, tell me some of the challenges that you had with those projects, and what did you do to overcome them?” Or you can ask something like, “Tell me about the kinds of technologies you’ve worked with recently. What technologies are you strongest working in?”

And then as they answer those questions, you are listening for if their background and their experience match up with what you’re looking for. So, being able to craft questions that tease out what someone’s background is, is important. This is also critical when it comes to finding out about someone’s cultural and personality traits. You don’t ask somebody, “Are you hard working?” You don’t ask somebody, “Do you do well under pressure?” What you ask somebody is something along the lines of, “What is your ideal work environment?” Or you can ask somebody, “What did you like about the culture in your last company, and what didn’t you like about the culture in your last company?”

SETTING THE STAGE FOR YOUR INTERVIEWS

So, as a little side note here, one of the things I always recommend in an interview is to set someone up to be able to answer questions honestly. People walk into an interview and their ultimate goal is they want to get the job. So they’re already pre-programmed to tell you what you want to hear so that they get the job. In other words, people are always trying to give you the right answer. It’s part of human nature.

So, what you want to do is set the stage with folks early on in the interview so that they can answer honestly to see if it’s a good fit for both parties. So, saying something like, “Hey, look, I know you’re interested in this job and you want to make sure this interview goes well. And so do I, but the last thing either of us wants would be for you to work here and it ends up not being a good fit for you. So, feel free to answer questions in this interview honestly. Don’t feel like you have to tell me the answer that I want to hear. I want to know the honest truth, and you should be able to tell me the honest truth, so that we can both gauge if this is a good fit for us.”

Setting the stage like that with somebody is going to give them a lot of freedom to answer questions honestly, so that both you and them can gauge true fit.

CONCLUSION

So, this is a brief insight into how to write interview questions in a way that truly allows you to find the right talent. If you’re able to incorporate this into your team and across your organization, you have the beginnings of a solid foundation for interviewing.

Here are some more great tips for writing your interview questions: https://bit.ly/2QH3MSh

Have questions or want to find out about working with us? Let’s chat! 

How To Write A Creative Director Job Description

This blog is a continuation of our series of posts regarding writing job descriptions for specific positions. As we’ve written on this topic a few times now, I’m not going to spend a lot going into detail regarding the general aspects of writing a job description, as many of these things are consistent from job to job. What does differ though are the two aspects of the job description that are the position requirements and the position description.

FOUR KEY PARTS TO ALL JOB DESCRIPTIONS

As a quick summary, we want to remind everybody that we recommend your job description has four key pieces. The first key piece is a company description which should include information about your company and your services. Also, what other perks or cultural pieces are important to note for any prospective candidates when they’re looking at potentially joining your team. Then there are the two sections in the middle which are the position description and the qualifications. The final section is typically information about salary, benefits, and other perks. The first and final section typically will remain the same in terms of structure across all of the job descriptions for your organization, whereas the two in the center are the ones that really change.

CLARIFYING YOUR CREATIVE DIRECTOR ROLE

Hiring for a Creative Director can be challenging because the title is a title that can differ greatly from organization to organization. A creative director is in my eyes one of the titles that has the widest range of potential experience for a position. Therefore, a job description is extremely critical when it comes to fleshing out for potential candidates what your requirements are for the job.

Not only can a creative director title vary in terms of years of experience and level of experience, but a creative director position also can differ greatly in terms of the type of creative work this person will be working on. Creative director titles are most commonly found within agencies, whether that be an advertising agency, a marketing company, a media agency, a PR firm, or something of that like. But, we also are seeing more and more creative director theme titles within in-house marketing departments that are wanting to bring the creative for their brand and/or brands in-house versus relying on outside sources.

ALTERING THE CREATIVE DIRECTOR TITLE

The creative director title is one that we recommend altering as much as possible depending on the level of experience that you’re looking for. So, using things to differentiate the level of experience are very important in your description. Creating titles like Senior Creative Director or Junior Creative Director or Executive Creative Director or Group Creative Director or things of that nature will allow your position by the title to be differentiated in terms of seniority.

We also recommend working into the title something that differentiates the type of work this position focuses on. This way you will attract the correct type of talent. For example, you may want to say Group Creative Director, Copy or Group Creative Director, Digital, or Group Creative Director, Print. Or some combination of that. The point here is to use words in the title that both differentiate seniority and the type of medium that this person will be working on.

CLARIFYING THE CREATIVE DIRECTOR CHANNELS

Along those lines, when you start getting into the details of the actual position description, you’re going to want to be very clear about the types of channels this person will be working on. To repeat ourselves here again, creatives work across a variety of mediums, so some are more multichannel, but some are more specific and honed in. Your job description needs to be very clear in regard to the different channels and/or mediums this person is going to be working on on a day-to-day basis. Be sure that the description also speaks to seniority. Will this person be managing people? Who are they going to be reporting to? Will they be involved with pitching new business? Or are they going to be more involved in-house on a branding perspective? You need to be very, very clear about what the day-to-day is going to be with this position as day-to-day is very different across creative director-type positions.

POSITION REQUIREMENTS

The position description is going to be very critical so that the person looking at your description can really tell if this is something that is up their alley or not. In regard to the position requirements, you’re going to want to follow a lot of the same guidelines. Like we’ve talked about in previous posts, you want to get very clear about what the must-haves are versus the nice-to-haves. The position requirements should always be split up in these two categories.

Depending on the level of seniority, previous management experience might be a must-have. This is something that we always recommend looking at. Regarding certain channels, you may want someone who’s a specialist working just with copy, or someone who’s a specialist just working with art, or someone who has been more on graphic design, etc. You want to get very clear on what the channels and mediums are that are must-have requirements, and what are the channels and mediums that are nice-to-have. You need to be realistic in your thinking. If you try to go too multichannel and try to have this person have experience in every single possible channel, it’s likely you may lose out on people who are going to think they aren’t qualified. List in priority the channels that you would like someone to have and the types of experience.

CONCLUSION

Spelling all this out is going to be critical as you want your description to be a fair representation of the role. So, when it comes to writing a creative director job description, the key things are getting very clear about what your seniority level is and what the specialty in terms of a channel are so that you can have your position description and your qualifications truly speak to the details of the role, and so you can also have the title of the position communicate right at the beginning what level the role is and what it’s going to be focused on.

Be sure to include as part of your description that these persons will need to submit work samples, whether that is a portfolio or other samples. It’s going to be a critical piece of your interview process to see work samples in the specific channels that you are looking to hire this person in.

Take all these things into account and you’ll get yourself a major advantage in hiring a creative director for your team. Good luck!

Here are some more great tips to add to your tool chest for hiring creatives! https://bit.ly/2ECWd8M

Have questions or want to find out about working with us? Let’s chat! 

How to Hire a Chief Growth Officer

A chief growth officer is a title and a position that is becoming more and more popular among organizations around the country and the world. Particularly, this is becoming more known and highly seen with startup companies, or companies very focused on growth and acquisition. A chief growth officer is typically someone who sits over a marketing function. Some might even say it is synonymous with the chief marketing officer, although the differentiation in title is important and intentional. A chief growth officer is very involved with marketing, sales, as well as product and product development. So a chief growth officer is sort of a hybrid leader over marketing, sales, and product. They are ensuring that a value proposition is being directed through all of these departments in a unified fashion.

DEFINING GROWTH WITHIN YOUR COMPANY

Growth is very specific in terms of its outcome. Of course, all companies want to grow, but there is a particular way to position your company to be a high-growth company. This takes a very specific skillset and a very specific type of background. Hiring a chief growth officer can be a little tricky, as it’s a newer title, and someone can come from many different types of backgrounds to fulfill on this title.

THE ROLE OF YOUR CHIEF GROWTH OFFICER

The first thing you’re going to want to do before hiring a chief growth officer is to get clear about what functions this role will oversee. Since this person deals with marketing, sales, product, and even to some degree finance, you’ve got to be clear about how this person is going to be situated within your organization. If you already have this fleshed out, you’re one step ahead of the game. But if not, it’s important to create an organizational chart for your company. Here you can define how this person is going to interact with other departments and teams.

WRITING A JOB DESCRIPTION

One mistake is having the job of your chief growth officer spread too thin across different departments and functions. Any time anybody is spread too thin, they’re not going to be able to get their job done. It becomes a capacity issue. Once you have an organizational chart figured out, you can write your job description. You need to define who they’re going to report to, and what functions they’re going to oversee. A powerful job description will outline this role across the different functions of marketing, sales, product, and maybe even finance. Marketing and sales are definitely the larger pieces of this puzzle. Depending on what you sell, product may or may not be a bigger piece of this. If you have a software product, then this may be a bigger function, but if your company is more service-driven, product might not be as important. So you’ll need to determine how important it is for this person to be involved with product.

HUNTING CANDIDATES

Once you have a solid job description, it will be nearly impossible to find the right person by simply posting the job and seeing who comes to you. These types of people are some of the most highly sought after folks in the market. They are typically not out on the market looking for a job. Again, I can’t stress enough that it’s going to be nearly impossible that this person is just going to find you. You’ll want to start by doing some networking and asking around who people might know and who might be available. It’s unlikely you’ll find someone through these channels as well, but you want to make sure to exhaust all avenues. This includes employee referrals as well as networking with other executives, CEOs, and business owners that you may know.

WHAT IS THEIR TRACK RECORD?

At the end of the day, you’re likely going to need some type of outbound recruiting effort to go out and headhunt these people. Likely, you’re going to specifically want to hire somebody from a company that is similar to yours. You want someone who has marketed, sold, and grown a similar product to the product that you’re selling. It doesn’t have to be exactly the same, but it should be similar. Someone with a similar background, who’s selling to a similar customer, is what’s most important. What’s even more important is going to be the customer base that they’re selling into. It’s critical that you find someone with a proven track record of growth and acquisition with the customer base that you’re targeting. This is going to be one of the most critical things to focus in on.

HONING IN ON THE RIGHT TITLES AND PEOPLE

You’ll want to go after people with growth titles, because that is what you’re doing here. This is not a common title as of yet, although they are out there. Acquisition is another type of title that you’re going to want to go after, as well as chief marketing officers and business development. Somebody with a sales title is likely not going to be the right candidate for this job. And somebody who is only product is likely not going to be a candidate for this job. You’re looking for chief marketing officers, chief growth officers, heads of acquisition, heads of customer acquisition, heads of business development, heads of new business, etc. These types of titles are going to get you in the right direction of the right people. You want to hone in on titles and people at companies selling into a similar customer that you are. This is going to get you in the right direction of hiring a chief growth officer.

ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS

Once you start getting some candidates and resumes in the door, you’ll want to find out and learn what their strategies are. You also want to know what sort of structures and systems they’ve used to achieve high growth and customer acquisition. Your interview process here is going to be very critical. You need to ask questions that don’t lead the witness. Your questions should be open-ended, and have these people really spell out their strategy and philosophy when it comes to growth. You’re going to want to get a very good picture about what they would do to grow your product.

Remember that these people are highly sought after, so you need to make sure that your employer brand is very strong. Your brand should clearly communicate the opportunity for this person to join your company. A high-level executive role like this requires some level of shmoozing. It’s important that you do what you need to do to impress upon this person the opportunity of your company.

CONCLUSION

These are some high-level points for you to consider when hiring a chief growth officer. If you’re interested in high growth and high customer acquisition, you may want to highly consider hiring someone in this sort of function for your company. Growth and acquisition is really the next evolution of marketing, and it takes marketing to the next level in order to have companies grow and acquire customers in ways that have not been seen before.

Have questions or want to hire us to speed up your process? Let’s chat! 

How To Find and Hire the Right Headhunter

Finding a headhunter, typically, is going to involve a lot of the upfront research and getting referrals from people that you know, etc., There are some other, more in depth, pieces that we’ll cover in this blog.

HEADHUNTERS VS. RECRUITERS

Headhunters can be an extremely critical aspect of your hiring process. A headhunter is different than a recruiter, although headhunters are also recruiters. This is someone who is going to go out and proactively search for candidates on your behalf. They are specialists at understanding their client’s needs and going out and networking to find specific talent for specific roles. A headhunter is a specialist in the sense that they, and only they, are going to know exactly what it takes to do the proactive work to find you specific talent for a specific role.

If you have a position that you can post on job boards and find good candidates for, then you do not need a headhunter for that position. Headhunters are more like a secret weapon that you are going to want to yield for specific roles. This is why headhunters are typically used at the executive level, like Director, VP, and C suite.

But headhunters can oftentimes be used at the entry and mid-level as well. In fact, many of our clients use us at the mid-level, as mid-level professionals are becoming harder and harder to recruit in today’s market. There is actually more of an abundance of senior people than there are of very solid mid-level people. Most organizations are weak when it comes to having strong mid-level people. Especially when it comes to hiring millennials.

CLARIFYING YOUR NEEDS

When you’re looking to hire a headhunter, the thing that is most important for you to get clear about first is what your specific need is. You’re going to want to hire a headhunter that is good and specialized in your specific need. But don’t go to crazy here! Many companies think they need to find a headhunter who does exactly what they do. The truth is, most headhunters specialize in an industry or a niche, not in a particular position.

And headhunting is a skill that can be applied to different industries. A good headhunter can use his network and skills of recruiting to head hunt any type of position. This is what makes a good headhunter a good headhunter. You want someone who knows what it takes to recruit and hunt top talent for any position.

You should actually be more focused in on if the recruiter understands what they’re doing. Do they know how to hunt, have a network, seem smart enough to understand your company, your position and your role? These smarts and these know-how are going to be way more important than someone who happens to work in your industry. Just because they work in your industry, doesn’t mean they’re a good headhunter. Now, if you can find a good headhunter who also specializes in your industry, then you’ve struck gold. This is someone that you want to bring onto your team as an asset.

INTERVIEWING POTENTIAL HEADHUNTERS

When it comes to hiring a headhunter, it’s important to know how to interview them, very similar to interviewing candidates. Many companies make mistakes when interviewing a headhunter because they ask simple yes or no questions that are too easy to answer, and therefore they don’t fully screen and vet properly.

You can’t ask a headhunter if they have experience working in marketing? It’s too easy for that headhunter to say yes. Instead, ask the headhunter to give you examples of some of the positions they’ve recently worked and had success with and some of the types of companies they’ve had success with. You’ll also want to find out about what types of markets they’ve had success working in.

Asking more open-ended questions and having the recruiter fill-in-the-blanks is going to give you a lot better insight into what kind of work they do. Ask them to explain to you some of the specifics or some of the niche details of some of the positions they have worked recently.

Another question you can ask a headhunter is about their process. A good headhunter is never going to give you their whole process, but will give you some insight into what they do. Ask the headhunter what they do and what about their process is unique. These kinds of questions are going to flesh out for you about this headhunter’s style.

HONING IN ON YOUR INDUSTRY

You can also ask them questions about your industry. Asking questions about your industry or the specific position you’re working will have answer in a way that will tell you if they actually have the technical know-how of the position that you’re looking to fill.

Some clients like to have recruiters give them a reference. In other words, they want to talk to one of the recruiter’s other clients to get a reference or insight into working with them. Just like we don’t recommend references with candidates, we also don’t recommend references when it comes to hiring a recruiter or a headhunter.

The reason being is that everybody has at least one or two good references. Whether they’re good or bad at recruiting, their reference is never going to be bad. Talking to references is not the best use of your time when it comes to working with somebody. If you’re able to interview someone and get a good feeling for them, then you should be able to run with that.

RETAINED VS. CONTINGENCY

The last piece here comes down to if you’re gonna hire the recruiter as a contingency headhunter or as a retained headhunter. This is a critical topic and it depends on how urgent your need is and how much challenge you’re having finding good people. If you have an urgent need and you’re challenged finding good people, it’s most likely going to make sense to go with the retainer model. A retainer model is more risky, but almost guarantees results if you’re working with the right headhunter.

Headhunters working from a contingency perspective can only give so much priority to their contingency positions. Retained positions always gain priority, and the recruiter is going take it to the very end until the position gets filled. A lot of companies make a big mistake hiring headhunters on a contingency basis when what they really need is a retained headhunter. Don’t let the fear of spending a little bit of money upfront, and taking some risk, stop you from taking the course that’s going to produce the best and fastest results.

CONCLUSION

The key is that you have interviewed your recruiter or headhunter correctly, so that you take out a lot of the risk when it comes to paying that retainer. Retainers are wildly more effective than contingency searches. For example, here at Aldebaran, our fill rate on retained searches is 95% with over 17 years in business, whereas our contingency fill rate is close to 70%, this is a very large difference.

We can guarantee prioritization of our VIP retained searches indefinitely. With contingency, we can only guarantee so much, and the more challenging your position is, the less we can guarantee it because it’s too risky.

This should give you some tips when it comes to hiring a headhunter. Headhunters are critical aspects to an organization when it comes to hiring specific talent. So you want to know when you need one and when you don’t need one. When you do need a headhunter, make sure you’re smart about it.

How To Write A VP Of Sales Job Description

how to write a vp of sales job description

Writing a job description for a VP of Sales can often be a daunting task.

It’s something that many hiring managers don’t like doing and don’t even really have the time to do.

A good VP of Sales job description though can go along way in attracting the right kind of talent for your team or organization.

A poorly written job description will often result in unqualified resumes and wasted time sifting through the wrong people for your team.

A good job description can be a powerful tool that will give you an edge in hiring the best talent in the market.

Often times we work with clients that have job descriptions that don’t truly match what the job is that they’re looking to hire. 

And they wonder why they’re not getting the right kind of candidates with the right kind of skills.

Usually, candidates apply for a job that is a match for their skill set or they apply for random jobs, it’s usually not somewhere in the middle.

So a well-written job description does give you a chance at finding people that are right for your needs.

POORLY WRITTEN VP OF SALES JOB DESCRIPTIONS

Candidates often think they’re not the right fit for a job because they read a job description that doesn’t seem to match their skills.

In fact, many times, we already know that they’re a fit for the job because we’ve spoken with the client.

Poorly written job descriptions can also result in candidates who are actually a fit for what you need not applying for your job.

This is another way that you can lose out on good talent!

At the end of the day, it’s worth the time and energy to write a good job description and it doesn’t have to be as challenging as you may think.

VP OF SALES JOB DESCRIPTIONS

Writing a sales job description is particularly important because there are a lot of different ways salespeople work across different industries.

A sales job description needs to articulate certain critical aspects in order to communicate effectively what is needed for the job.

Job titles can be very deceiving and even leave more questions, particularly when it comes to sales roles.

It’s important that the job description communicates what the role is so that people are not solely relying on the title.

For example, a VP of sales could be a department head who’s leading a team of sales people.

VP of sales could also be an individual contributor who does not manage any team members and is selling on their own.

And they could also be anything in between these two extremes.

It’s critical that if you’re hiring for VP sales you want to start off by being clear about what this position is in your company.

WRITING THE JOB DESCRIPTION

This rule of thumb really goes for any type of job you may be writing a job description for.

The first step is to start jotting down and brainstorming about the key functions this role is going to need.

You want to make sure you narrow it down to 10 or less key functions within a role.

I would even say that a sweet spot really is five key functions.

Whether that be managing a team of sales executives or selling on their own or a combination of both.

They could be building a team or focusing on channel relationships and partnerships or managing and/or doing inside or outside sales.

VP OF SALES ROLES ARE EXTREMELY DIVERSE

You want to hone in on exactly the type of sales and the type of management this person is going to be doing.

There’s a big difference between inside sales, outside sales, lead generation, channel sales, partner sales, and the list goes on.

There are also different parts of the sales cycle that many roles will or won’t be responsible for.

For example, will this part of the role be responsible for cold calling in generating leads?

Will they be responsible for managing relationships, closing sales and closing warm leads?

Will this person be reselling to existing customers?

Often times it’s a combination of all these things.

FOUR SECTIONS OF A VP OF SALES JOB DESCRIPTION

It’s critical to flush out exactly what the key functions of the role are going to be so that this all gets spelled out in a job description.

We recommend a VP of Sales job description always has four sections.

The first section should be a company overview which gives an overview of your company and some insight into your culture.

You want to make sure that this section mentions some key points.

This should include anything about you being fast growing, anything about your industry, and some of your successes.

Also, include some of the things that are great and unique about working with you.

VP OF SALES SKILLS AND QUALIFICATIONS

The next two sections are the meat of the job description.

This will include the required skills or qualifications.

These are hard skills and qualifications that this person is going to already need to have to bring to the table.

So this is where you may need something like a track record in building sales teams or selling a certain amount of sales per year or working with certain types of budgets.

You may need a track record of working in certain industries or with a certain type of company or client.

You may need a track record of selling into a particular vertical, or of selling to a particular decision maker.

Next, you’re going to have the key must have’s for the role.

We recommend this section not be too long and that you distinguish between what is a must-have and what is a nice-to-have.

This is also where we recommend having years of experience.

Years of experience truly is just a number, but it is a good gauge and we do recommend putting it on a section of your job descriptions.

VP OF SALES ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

The third section is the actual job description.

This tells what the role is, what it’s going entail, what it’s going to accomplish and what it’s going to be responsible and accountable for.

This is where you want to spell out what the roles and responsibilities are going to be so that is very clear what this role is.

This can come before the required skills or after – it’s up to you.

The point is these sections can be flip-flopped.

ABOUT YOUR COMPANY

The final section is always good to give an overview of your company benefits and anything else about company culture.

Anything that you didn’t cover in the first section can be added here and is a nice way to round out a job description.

You can also mention compensation or salary here if you’d like.

However, we recommend not putting in salary or compensation on a job description and leaving that open for discussion in your first interview.

Lastly, you don’t want a job description to be too long.

All of this should onto two to three pages maximum.

CONCLUSION

Writing a VP of Sales job description does not have to be complicated.

It’s four simple parts and typically the first and fourth parts can be recycled from job description to job description, regardless of the role.

Sections two and three are going to require the most work.

You’re going to want to make sure to hone in on these sections and that they’re complete, clear and concise.

In conclusion, writing a job description particularly for a role like a VP of sales is critical.

You will be able to attract and not turn away the right talent for your team.

Best of luck!


Here are some more great tips for hiring the right sales team! https://bit.ly/2DFQZIy


Have questions or want to find out about working with us? Let’s chat! 

https://aldebaranrecruiting.com/looking-for-talent/

Top 5 Digital Marketing Interview Questions

Hiring for marketing in today’s landscape can be challenging.

There are a lot of different types of marketing out there. 

A lot of professionals are specialized working in one or sometimes many marketing channels.

It’s important to make sure that you’re able to hire somebody who is going to be able to do the job you need them to do.

Marketing is especially a critical aspect of any business, as marketing and sales are the lifeblood of an organization.

So making a good or bad hire in marketing can make or break your organization.

At the end of the day it all comes down to talent, so hiring the right talent is your job.

Hiring in general is tricky and interviewing truly is an art.

GETTING CLEAR ABOUT YOUR NEEDS

First and foremost, before you even get to the interview stage it’s critical that you have a clear picture of what you need.

Often times, hiring managers will start to interview candidates without having a clear picture of what they need.

You’ll want to sit down and get clear about what the different channels are that are critical for your business.

If this is already spelled out and clear for you then you can skip this step.

If not, we recommend truly examining this and deciding which channels are important to you.

Sometimes candidates have expertise and other channels that will crossover.

For example, search engine optimization and search engine marketing have a lot of crossover, but they’re not the same.

If you need someone who is heavily focused in SEO or SEM you’ll need to tailor your interview process to flesh out that person’s strengths.

Most people who do SEO also know how to do SEM, but they may be stronger or weaker in one or the other.

BEYOND SEO AND SEM

There are also many other digital channels that you could need for your business.

Some things to consider aside from SEO and SEM are email marketing, social media, paid social or other types of paid or display ads.

You might need someone strong in writing content for different ads, and/or someone stronger from a strategy perspective.

You need to take all of these things into account when you’re writing a job description.

Nowadays digital marketing people need to be much more involved from an analytics and campaign perspective.

You’ll need to figure out a way to screen for this if it’s important to your business.

WHAT ABOUT TECHNOLOGY?

The other thing that you’ll need to be clear about is how technical you need this person to be.

Are they going to be making website updates?

Do they need to have a design background?

Should they have some development skills?

Marketing is tied so much with technology nowadays that these are things you’ll need to consider.

Your position may be more or less specialized and you may need somebody with only one or two channels of expertise.

On the other hand, you may need someone who is extremely multi channeled who knows how to market in a wide variety of channels.

Getting very clear about all of this will help you tailor your interview questions.

DO NOT LEAD THE WITNESS

Many interviewers make the common mistake of what we call “leading the witness” when interviewing a candidate.

What we mean by that is asking questions that are too easy to answer.

Asking a question like, “are you good at search engine marketing?” makes it very easy for a candidate to just answer “yes.”

So they have told you exactly what you want to hear.

This is particularly important when hiring marketing folks, and especially when you need to hone in on someone with digital expertise.

ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS

Asking the right questions when interviewing digital marketing candidates is everything!

QUESTION #1

The number one thing to ask a digital marketing person is to tell you about recent campaigns and projects they’ve been responsible for.

Ask them to walk you through the day-to-day of running those campaigns and projects and what they have their hands on.

You want to ask open ended questions like, “walk me through your day to day” and “what are your most recent projects and campaigns?”

Asking this question in this way is going to give you insight into what the person’s day looks like and doesn’t lead to witness.

It doesn’t give them something to launch off from to tell you what they think you want to hear.

You want questions that actually have them walk through their day to day.

Then you can get a sense of what this person has been doing and see if that matches up with what you need.

MEASURING PERFORMANCE

QUESTION #2

The next critical question for marketing candidates is having them explain what their KPI’s are, and how they’re measured and managed for their performance.

Find out what they think important KPI’s are, how they measure KPI’s and how they adjust and optimize different projects in the campaigns they’re running.

It’s critical that a marketing person is connected to their performance and outcomes of their activities.

You want to get some insight into how this person knows they’re effective or not effective.

QUESTION #3

Another critical question is what they think the most important aspects of marketing are when it comes to acquiring customers.

You want to understand their philosophy, where they come from and how they think as a marketer.

It is critical for you to evaluate them as a marketer as well as to see if their philosophy on marketing lines up with your company values and strategy.

HANDLING CHALLENGES

QUESTION #4

A fourth great question to ask candidates is to have them tell you about a challenging campaign or project that they have come across.

You want to hear of a major hurdle or article that they needed to overcome.

Have them walk you through what the problem was, what happened and how they dealt with it.

This will give you insight into their thinking and how they solve problems from a marketing perspective.

The more specific you get them to answer, the better, as you’ll get a sense of how they deal with problems as a marketer and how they overcome them.

HIRING FOR CULTURE FIT

QUESTION #5

Last, but not least you want to ask them to tell you what their idea work environment and company culture looks like.

When asking candidates this, ask them to be honest because people tend to want to tell the interviewer what they think they want to hear.

Candidates want to get the job and so they’ll likely tell you that they’re going to fit in with your company.

You want to really know if working together would really be a good fit.

There are lot of different people and a lot of personalities out there in the world and not everybody works well together.

It’s important to keep in mind that is not a problem at all, you just have to keep looking.

There is a lid for every pot and so you want to make it safe for the candidate to tell you about their ideal culture.

You want to be able to truly gauge if they would be a good fit for you and for them.

In the same breath you can also ask about some of the things that they don’t like in a work environment and culture.

You can gauge dislikes against your company culture as well.

CONCLUSION

These are some simple steps that you can apply when it comes to hiring digital marketing people. 

If you’re smart you’ll be able to take these questions and apply them to any type of professional.

Your interview questions should all be tailored and used to hire the best marketing talent out there to grow and scale your business.

Good luck!


If you’re still building your interview questions, here’s a great resource! https://muse.cm/1hLMaHT


Have questions or want to find out about working with us? Let’s chat! 

https://aldebaranrecruiting.com/looking-for-talent/

How Much Does A Headhunter Cost?

In today’s blog we will cover the way headhunters are paid, how much they cost, and the different fee models in which you can hire a recruiter.

Particularly, contingency or retained headhunters.

The costs for various recruiters are similar and there will only be minor differences depending on which company you work with.

It’s important to keep in mind that the fee models for permanent placement candidates versus contract, freelance or staffing can be different.

Staffing recruiters are typically never referred to as headhunters.

When looking to hire a headhunter you’re typically looking for someone who’s going to find a long-term full-time employee.

A headhunter is someone who is hunting high-level, typically director level or above, talent for an organization.

FEE MODEL FOR CONTINGENCY & RETAINED RECRUITING

A headhunter fee is always based off of the candidate’s first year salary as negotiated in an offer letter.

Depending on the headhunter, that first year’s salary can include a sign on bonus or any other compensation that happens in that first year.

The first year’s compensation typically would not include sales commissions or bonuses.

The only bonus that is usually included in a first year salary when calculating the recruiter’s fee is a sign on bonus.

Relocation expenses and anything else of that nature would not be included in the calculation.

RECRUITING FEE RANGES

Whatever the headhunter’s fee is would be multiplied by the first year’s starting salary.

For example, if a Director of Marketing is offered a position at $100,000 and recruiter’s fee is 20%, that would be a $20,000 fee paid to the recruiter.

In terms of the range of fees, these can vary greatly depending on which firm you work with and what type of position you’re working.

Fees can be as low as 15% and as high as 40% or even 50%.

The industry standard is typically between 20 to 25%.

One thing to keep in mind when hiring a headhunter, as with anything, is that you always get what you pay for.

There are a lot more firms out there nowadays doing extremely low fees like 15% while some other firms are up to 30-40-50%.

That doesn’t necessarily mean that you’re going to get a much better service than you might at the 25% range.

FOCUS ON WHAT’S IMPORTANT

As a note, I’ve written other blogs about tips for hiring headhunters covering more important factors than the fees alone.

You should be focused on hiring the right headhunter for your business than trying to get the best deal.

At the end of the day, if you hire a headhunter who is extremely cheap, but not going to get you the results you need, then you’re at a loss.

RETAINED RECRUITING

Retained recruiting can work in a couple of different ways, but is similar to retaining a lawyer.

Although when you’re retaining a lawyer you’re typically making a monthly payment to have them working for you.

This isn’t typically the way that retaining a recruiter works, although you can retain recruiters this way if you have substantial recruiting needs.

Typically a retained headhunter is going to work on one or a handful of positions.

When retaining a recruiter you’re typically going to pay an upfront fee, also sometimes known as an engagement fee.

You’re paying that recruiter for working a search for you and typically that recruiter will have exclusivity working that role.

Any money that you pay upfront to a retained recruiter will come out of your final invoice.

RETAINER FEES

A typical retainer is a third of the estimated fee.

Again, if you’re hiring a retained headhunter to work a position with an estimated salary of $100,000, that’s a $20,000 fee.

If the retainer is 1/3 of the $20,000 fee, you’ll pay roughly $6666, which would then be deducted from your final invoice.

Many retained firms ask for 1/3 of the fee up front, another 1/3 if the placement hasn’t been done at 60 days and the final 1/3 once the placement is complete.

Many companies stray away from retained search firms because any of the money that you pay up front is at risk.

If for some reason they don’t fill the role, you put it on hold or you find someone on your own, you’ve lost that money.

Aldebaran has a very unique retainer model that is extremely low risk, but still gets all the benefit.

If you’re interested in learning more about how we work you should reach out to us!

Although retained recruiting is slightly more risky, it is highly more effective than contingency recruiting.

CONTINGENCY RECRUITING

Contingency recruiting tends to be a favorite for a lot of companies filling lower-level positions.

Retained recruiting tends to be reserved for more high-level roles that require special attention.

The fee that you pay in contingency recruiting is contingent on the recruiter finding the right candidate and you hiring them.

With the contingency search you only pay a fee if and when you hire someone from that headhunter.

From a financial perspective it’s less risk because you aren’t paying any money upfront to secure having the headhunter work for you.

Again we can’t stress enough that you get what you pay for!

RECRUITERS PRIORITIES

Recruiters are always going to prioritize their search internally, and this makes sense.

If someone has paid us a retainer fee we are going to have the work go toward that job, it’s only fair.

Most recruiting firms will only be able to budget a certain amount of time for any contingency search.

For retained searches, recruiters will typically work a job until the job is done.

That’s why retained searches tend to be 30-40% and even sometimes 50% more effective than contingency recruiting.

QUALITY OVER QUANTITY

I talk with a lot of clients with tough roles to fill and they complain that contingency recruiters aren’t showing them good candidates.

This isn’t too much of a surprise.

If you have a tough role you’re looking to fill, a contingency firm is going to give it a shot maybe for a few weeks.

If they don’t come up with somebody it’s going to be less profitable or sometimes even negatively profitable for them to continue working the role.

Contingency firms simply cannot dedicate unlimited resources to contingency searches.

When you’ve got a tricky role or something that requires special attention you really want to go the retainer route.

The retained route is way more effective and if you have a good recruiting firm that you trust, this shouldn’t be an issue as it’s just an upfront payment.

If you’re confident they’re going to find you somebody then that’s the way to go.

CONCLUSION

So this is a basic rundown of how recruiting firms and headhunters are paid.

At the end of the day you want to find a recruiting company that is a good match for you, your company and your industry.

You need someone you can trust who’s going to find you quality candidates.

This should be your primary concern and cost should be your secondary concern.

You do get what you pay for and it is worth it to pay a little bit more for a good recruiter. 


How do you find a great recruiter anyway? Go here for more: https://bit.ly/2EJyIrE


Have questions or want to find out about working with us? Let’s chat! https://aldebaranrecruiting.com/looking-for-talent/

How To Hire A Headhunter

It is certainly important to follow a process when hiring a headhunter because there aren’t as many good headhunters as there are mediocre ones.

The recruiting industry is littered with a massive variety of different types of recruiters and different types of people.

Recruiting is an unregulated industry which means you don’t have to have a license or any sort of certification to call yourself a recruiter.

Therefore anybody can put that they’re a recruiter on their LinkedIn profile without having any experience or qualifications.

There are a lot of inexperienced, unethical, ineffective, etc. types of headhunters and recruiters out there.

It’s critical that you are smart about how you hire a headhunter or a recruiter.

LESS IS MORE

It’s also really important that you don’t make the mistake that some companies make by thinking more is better.

It is never a good idea to hire three, four or even five different headhunting companies to work on your open positions.

You’ll end up managing too many relationships which takes up too much time and the market can get oversaturated with your position.

Candidates will have three or four people reaching out to them about the same role and this will make your company look desperate in the market.

This is not a good initial impression to make with potential candidates.

At most you want to be working with two headhunting firms at a time and ideally really only one.

The goal should be to find one good recruiting firm that can help you with certain roles.

HIRING MORE THAN ONE RECRUITER

You may need to work with multiple recruiting firms depending on their specialties and which roles you’re trying to fill.

For example, you might need one headhunting firm to focus on sales and marketing and another to focus on technology roles like developers and software engineers.

Splitting it up this way can be very effective as different recruiting companies will be working different roles. 

This will also prevent companies from stepping over each other and you will have less relationships to manage.

SEEKING REFERRALS FOR A HEADHUNTER

How you go through the process of hiring a headhunter is important because the goal is to only have one or two at your disposal.

You want to start your search in the usual places such as Google and Yelp, although keep in mind Yelp tends to be more localized.

You may want to think about some business colleagues that you could check in with about a referral and get some insight from them.

It’s likely that some of your colleagues, some of your competitors, or some of your other partners have worked with recruiters in the past.

A referral is always going to be great because you already know that this person has some sort of track record.

You might also want to think about if you’ve ever been recruited before.

The company you’re at may have also used previous recruiters and that could be a good place to start as well.

At the end of the day, we recommend doing some online research on companies pages, websites, social media and LinkedIn.

INTERVIEWING POTENTIAL RECRUITERS

You can then narrow it down to a handful or five or less companies that you want to interview.

This gives you a chance to see who’s going to be best to work on the particular role or roles that you need.

It’s very critical that you interview the headhunters to find out who’s going to be the best for your company.

You want to find out what their industry specialty is, what types of professionals, and what types verticals and companies they work with.

You certainly want to hire a recruiter that has experience working with your type of company.

FOCUS ON INDUSTRY AND VERTICAL 

Focus on industry is more important than focus on a particular type of role.

Sometimes hiring managers and HR people will get too bogged down on a certain title or type of position.

Types of positions are extremely narrow and a good headhunter’s reach is going to go beyond just certain types of positions.

A good recruiter will focus on a specific industry or vertical and will be able to work most positions within that industry or vertical.

For example, we focus working with a lot of advertising, marketing, and PR agencies and we can fill 99% of roles within those industries.

This is because we are so focused on that vertical, that we understand those types of companies and have deep networks there.

CHECKING OFF THE BOXES

Ask about their process, how in-depth they are, and if they’re focus is more on quality or quantity.

You want to be sure you’re working with a recruiter who is more quality focused.

Ask them on average how many resumes do they send to a client to get a job filled.

This will give you some insight into the kind of quality they are sending.

Ask them how they are going to figure out how to hire for your culture.

Hiring for culture is critical and this is something that you want to be really interested in.

How is this potential recruiter or headhunter going to be able to represent your company accurately?

Once you’ve interviewed a handful of headhunters, take a look and see what boxes they check off and who will be the best fit.

It’s important that you have an understanding of how they work and how they’re going to work on your behalf.

You have to be sure you can trust this person to represent you, your team and your company.

Does this potential headhunter have a strong grasp of the position you’re hiring them to fill?

Do they understand my company and my industry?

You can see how interviewing headhunters is very important as it is a major time investment.

RETAINED VS. CONTINGENCY RECRUITING

You’ll also need to decide if you’re going to go the retained recruiting or contingency recruiting route.

Contingency recruiting tends to be the most common where you will not pay a fee unless the recruiter finds you someone that you hire.

Retained recruiting is where you pay an upfront engagement fee.

Like anything, you get what you pay for and retained recruiting is wildly more effective than contingency recruiting.

Many people complain that their contingency recruiter didn’t produce the results they wanted. 

What they don’t understand is that contingency recruiters can only put in so much work since there has been no fees paid up front.

Contingency recruiters are shouldering all the risk, so your role is likely not top priority.

This is why here at Aldebaran our retained fill rate is above 95% and our contingency fill rate is around 70%.

That is a 30% gap in effectiveness on retained verse contingency – a huge gap!

So again, you really do get what you pay for!

Although it can be risky to pay a retainer up front, it’s going to get you way better results.

If you think you can trust a recruiting firm and they seem like the right fit, you should consider paying an engagement fee.

Especially if you’re serious about getting your position filled.

OTHER THINGS TO CONSIDER

Don’t let your fear of a recruiter not getting the job done get in the way of getting really positive results.

Something else to keep in mind is hiring your headhunter based on location.

Some companies think they need to have their recruiter be local to whatever city they’re in, but this is not the case.

Hiring your recruiter based on location can actually limit you greatly to the types of great headhunters that are out there.

For example, we work in every major market around the country.

Although we’re based in San Diego, our largest candidate and client pools are in New York and San Francisco.

So you can see that location doesn’t limit us or you as a hiring manager at all.

This may be the case with many headhunters so you certainly want to be open to recruiters that are in other markets and not just your local market.

Again, the focus should be on industry, vertical and candidate expertise.

These things are much more important then location.

CONCLUSION

At the end of the day there are some very important criteria that you want to take into consideration when it comes to hiring a headhunter.

If you find a good one be sure to hang onto them.

By the way, we are one of those so feel free to give us a call!


Want more guidance on hiring the right recruiter or headhunter? Go here: https://bit.ly/2CdWv5m


Have questions or want to find out about working with us? Let’s chat! https://aldebaranrecruiting.com/looking-for-talent/

What Is A Corporate Recruiter?

A corporate recruiter is best defined in relationship to an executive recruiter or even a staffing recruiter.

Corporate recruiters exist in house at a corporation regardless of the size of the corporation.

A corporate recruiter could also be called an in-house recruiter and typically exists on an HR team.

Sometimes they’re also on a more distinct department of an HR team known as talent acquisition.

A corporate recruiter’s job is similar to an executive recruiter or a staffing recruiter and is to recruit candidates.

THE DIFFERENCE WITH CORPORATE RECRUITERS

Corporate recruiters are likely focusing on specific roles that tend to have a wide variety of roles and experience.

These roles could be in logistics, marketing, sales, entry-level, senior level or executive level roles and so on.

Often times senior-level roles are reserved for more senior recruiters.

These types of roles, which typically start at the director level or above, require a different type of experience and expertise.

A corporate recruiter often is also focused on hiring for one company only.

An executive or staffing recruiter is going to be working with a variety of clients and locations, often nationwide and sometimes globally.

One thing that’s important to keep in mind with corporate recruiters is that they are always going to be solely focused on recruiting.

All they’re going to be doing is recruiting and managing the full recruiting lifecycle.

*For more information about what the full recruiting lifecycle is, or what a full cycle recruiter is, please refer to an earlier blog HERE.

OTHER RECRUITERS

An executive or agency recruiter is going to be focused on recruiting for multiple companies and levels and probably not solely recruiting.

Agency recruiters are almost always doing some level of sales and/or client services.

Since agency recruiters are also vendors, they will also be constantly managing client relationships, up selling, opening and growing accounts.

This is a unique sales function that is particular to agency recruiters that a corporate recruiter is never going to deal with.

Agency recruiters are typically going to be held to a higher standard as they need to pay more attention to quality versus quantity.

Internal corporate recruiters don’t have to prove themselves as much as an outside recruiter.

Typically corporate recruiters get paid a lot more money than agency recruiters since they’re on salary with some bonuses and commissions.

A corporate recruiter is part of HR, while an agency, executive or staffing recruiter is more of a sales person who is also a recruiter.

ADVANTAGES OF CORPORATE RECRUITERS

One thing to know is that corporate recruiters tend to have an advantage and a better grasp on culture within a company.

Since they’re in house with the company, they have day-to-day interactions with the culture and other employees of the company.

They’re often involved in other conversations with HR about staff augmentation, company structure and strategy.

They will have an insight into things that the agency recruiters are just never going to be privy to.

This can be an advantage as hiring for culture is becoming more and more important across organizations.

Being able to find people that are the right cultural fit for the long term is critical for anyone dealing with talent acquisition.

WHERE OTHERS RECRUITERS FALL SHORT

This is where most executive recruiters or agency recruiters drop the ball.

They don’t do the legwork to find out about their clients culture and their clients needs.

And they don’t stay in touch and communicate with their clients in ways that keep them connected.

They in turn tend to find people that may or may not be the best cultural fit.

Often times this is why there is such an industry wide fall off ratio for agency recruiters.

If you are going to hire a recruiter you want the advantage of being connected with your company culture.

If you’re an agency recruiter it’s critical that you take the extra steps necessary to be able to do that.

Corporate recruiters are often times going to be very invested in their company given that they work there.

So this can sometimes lead to another competitive advantage in terms of finding the right talent.

RETAINED VS. CONTINGENCY RECRUITERS

This is why most of the time retained recruiting agencies are wildly more effective than contingency.

Often companies don’t want to pay engagement fees, but don’t realize the fees are guaranteeing much better results.

For example, here at Aldebaran, we have a 95% close rate on our VIP retained searches while our contingency searches rate is closer to 60%.

This is a very large discrepancy, but that’s because retained searches get prioritized and have permanent VIP status.

A contingency search isn’t going to have permanent VIP status.

When contingency searches don’t produce results in 3-4 weeks they lose priority as other needs come in through the business.

It becomes less and less profitable for a recruiting firm to spend too much time on contingency searches.

If you find a good recruiter and pay the engagement fees, you’ll get sometimes up to 50% increase in effectiveness!

CORPORATE OVERLOAD

A corporate recruiter is likely going to be able to spend unlimited resources on any given position until it’s filled.

This is an advantage, but the potential problem is that roles tend to stack up.

At many organizations, corporate recruiters are overloaded and unable to focus on the needs of the organization. 

Agency recruiters tend to be more experienced and better head hunters than corporate recruiters.

This is simply because of their exposure to different markets, clients, and different types of opportunities.

Agency recruiters tend to have a better understanding of business and how different companies work together.

A good agency recruiter is going to be able to be an asset to you and your talent acquisition team.

If you find and hire a good external recruiter, make sure that you’re leaning on and leveraging them for advice.

They are exposed to a lot and can give you a lot of insight into different aspects and strategies in the market.

So these are some of the differences between corporate recruiters and agency recruiters.

There are many more, but this is an initial look at the differences in the types of recruiters out there. 


Here are more things to consider when thinking of hiring a recruiter: https://bit.ly/2C5Ot9C


Have questions or want to find out about working with us? Let’s chat! https://aldebaranrecruiting.com/looking-for-talent/

What Is Headhunting?

Headhunting is really an aspect of recruiting.

You could say that all headhunters are recruiters, but not all recruiters are headhunters.

In fact, most recruiters aren’t headhunters at all.

And even most recruiters who consider themselves headhunters, aren’t truly headhunters.

A true headhunter possesses a specific skill set which allows them to effectively and aggressively tap into the passive talent market.

They are able to track and attain specific talents that would never have found out about a role or position otherwise.

HEADHUNTING VS. RECRUITING

Headhunters are really more like actual hunters, where recruiters are really more like farmers.

A normal recruiter is typically going to rely on a high volume of inbound submissions.

These passive submissions usually come from other job boards, a company web portal or something of that nature.

A recruiter is mostly working with active talent that is out in the market.

These people are applying for jobs, interviewing with multiple companies and submitting to a wide variety of companies.

Another thing a recruiter tends to deal with is having to screen hundreds and hundreds of irrelevant resumes.

Job boards are making it increasingly easier for people to apply to all kinds of positions without seeing if they’re a good fit.

On one side of the recruiting spectrum is a fully passive recruiter who is only dealing with inbound submissions.

On the other end of the spectrum you have a headhunter who doesn’t rely on inbound submissions at all.

A headhunter will almost never even talk to someone who is an inbound submission.

A HEADHUNTER’S NETWORK

Headhunters are 100% proactive in what they do, which is why it’s so important to have a well established network.

In headhunting, a well established network is defined by a large candidate pool.

A large candidate pool is no good unless you know how to interact in a way that’s going to get you the results you need.

A good headhunter knows how to continuously be expanding their network.

They will know how to massage their network in different ways to be able to constantly be drumming up new talent.

This is why headhunters tend to have more of a hunter and sales mentality than a recruiter on the other side of the spectrum.

WORKING WITH A HEADHUNTER

Headhunters are very good at learning exactly what their clients need as far as quality over quantity.

They will ask a lot of questions about what specifics are needed for a particular role, both hard skills and soft skills.

The more questions a headhunter asks, the more they’re going to be able to hone in on what their client needs.

Once the picture is clear about what the client needs, a headhunter is going to use their candidate network.

They will also use their extended network to make contact with hundreds, if not thousands of people.

RECRUITING PASSIVE TALENT

The majority of those are likely not actively on the job market looking for a job.

A headhunter is skilled at starting initial conversations with these people.

They will be able to get them interested, engaged and potentially making a move from their current company.

It requires a very specific skill set and a certain finesse to be able to get someone interested in another role when they’re happy where they’re at.

A headhunter is very good at building relationships and trust with candidates.

This allows them to guide them through the process while continually selling and closing them along the way.

Working with passive talent requires a lot more handholding and selling of an opportunity along the way.

This is an important distinction that many recruiters and hiring managers don’t understand.

Someone who is currently working needs to be treated differently than someone who isn’t working or is already actively looking.

Someone actively looking for a position already has a very high degree of motivation to make a move.

Passive candidates don’t have as high motivation and it’s a good headhunter’s job to move them to a place of high motivation.

This is where more of a selling piece comes into play and less of a farming piece.

SEEKING SPECIALIZED TALENT

Headhunters are best used when you are requiring some sort of specialized talent.

If you have a role that is specialized in any way you’re likely going to need someone to lead a proactive effort to find the right person.

It’s highly unlikely that specialized talent is going to find your job on a job board or your website.

The odds of this happening with even one person are extremely slim, let alone with a handful of people to choose a quality candidate from.

With any sort of specialized role you’re looking to fill it’s critical to have an outbound proactive strategy in order to find those people.

Those people are most likely working for your competition or in adjacent industries or verticals.

This is also where a headhunter is going to be extremely effective and useful at tapping into your competition. 

They will tap into neighboring industries and verticals and give you an advantage to poach from some of your competition and other companies.

The ability to poach highly effective and sought after talent will give you a certain competitive edge in being able to compete in the marketplace.

Often times the people who are not working and are actively looking for a position are in that place for a reason.

HEADHUNTING PASSIVE TALENT

The best talent on the market is typically the passive talent.

We know many candidates who have never applied for a job in their life and have never been on the market looking.

They’ve always been sought after or recruited and have only moved jobs when they were recruited by headhunter.

Those are the kind of people that you want to be able to get for your organization as that is the best talent in the market.

The absolute only reliable way to go after those people is to have them headhunted.

The only other second option is going to be networking within your organization or pure luck.

Networking within your organization or your own network can be a very useful tool.

That is something that should be explored, but it’s likely it will be exhausted fairly quickly.

You want to have an abundance of solid talent coming your way so that you’re able to pick the best of the best.

A headhunter is going to give you the ability to pick the best of the best.

CONCLUSION

Headhunters are recruiters, but not all recruiters are headhunters.

On a spectrum of recruiting, regular recruiters are more like farmers and headhunters are more like hunters.

Headhunters are extremely useful for proactive poaching from competition and also proactive tapping into the passive talent pool.

Make sure to assess your needs and figure out what the best strategy is for you and your company.

It’s likely a headhunter is going to be useful in many ways and the trick is finding a good one.

Check out some of our other blogs about the best way to work with recruiters.


Not sure if hiring a recruiter is right for you? Here are some things to consider: https://bit.ly/2ybIQ9L


Want to find out about working with us? Let’s chat! https://aldebaranrecruiting.com/looking-for-talent/

How Do I Find A Job I Love?

Love Your Work - Find the Job You Love

Nobody should ever work for an extended period of time at a job where they are unhappy.

In today’s strong economy, or any economy, nobody should settle for working in a job that they don’t like.

We hear from so many people very regularly that they’re working in a job that isn’t a good fit for them.

THE REASONS FOR DISSATISFACTION ARE MANY

Sometimes it isn’t a good fit culturally, sometimes it’s the work they’re doing that isn’t a match for their skills.

Sometimes they’re being underpaid, and sometimes the company just isn’t aligned with their values, ethics or goals.

The list goes on for the reasons that people don’t like where they’re working.

Again, we hear this extremely often and we find it disconcerting the amount of people that don’t like their jobs.

WAITING FOR THE WEEKEND

Gary Vaynerchuk talks a lot about how if your whole life is about waiting for the weekend then you need to change your game.

I couldn’t agree with this more.

If you suffer throughout the week only to live for the weekend, you should seriously be looking at making some changes.

The weekends are such a small fraction of your life, that you want to look at how you have your life and your career organized.

You spend the vast majority of your life at your job working.

Whether behind a desk, at a construction site, with clients in houses or in a retail store, that time should not be spent suffering.

SUFFERING COMPLACENCY

The thing that is even more disconcerting is the amount of people who are complacently unhappy in their job’s demand.

In other words, the amount of people that have been unhappy in their jobs for significant periods of time.

It almost seems like a lot of us like to complain about being unhappy but not do anything about it.

It’s like there’s something romantic or enjoyable about suffering, or that we get out of complaining a lot and being unhappy.

MAKING THE CHANGE

I say if you are unhappy in your job, do something about it! And if you’re not going to do something about it, then don’t complain.

You only get to complain if you’re actually going to do something about it.

The good news is you probably won’t complain for too long because you’re taking action around altering your situation.

There’s nothing worse than someone who complains about something that they can change.

This is the definition of a victim!

None of us deserve to be victims in any situation, especially at our jobs.

YOUR JOB SHOULD GIVE YOU LIFE AND MAKE YOU HAPPY

I think we all have the right to work somewhere that is a true fit for our values and a true fit for our goals.

You should work somewhere that gives you life and makes you happy.

You should do something that you’re excited to wake up in the morning and contribute to.

And, you should make good money!

GETTING PAST WHAT’S IN YOUR WAY

We often find there are a lot of circumstances that get in people’s way as to why they can’t find a new job.

Perhaps you don’t have the education or the time.

Sometimes people talk about how they’ve tried and haven’t been able to get what they want, or they apply and don’t get any interviews.

It’s not always easy, but it’s worth it to put in the work to find something and be somewhere that you truly like.

If you’re having difficulty, there are a lot of resources out there to support you.

There are career centers, career coaches, life coaches, and a lot of other resources for you to branch out and grow.

Networking & marketing events, conferences, and trade shows are all great resources.

You need to get yourself exposed to different people, opportunities and types of work that could be a match for you.

WHAT ABOUT EDUCATION?

If you don’t have the education that you need, you can take night classes while you work.

The ability to take night or online classes makes getting an education extremely affordable and flexible.

So if education is the missing piece, you simply need to go out and get educated.

Something that’s very important to do is to get clear about your values and what’s most important to you.

From that vantage point you can look for what might be the best type of career that would engender and feed your passion.

THE PITFALLS OF LOVING YOUR JOB

Sometimes it can be a pitfall to have your job be something that is also a hobby or a passion.

When you take a passion or a hobby and turn into a job, you take something that you like and turn it into work.

This is something to keep in mind as you’re exploring this process.

Of course it is still possible to have a job that you like and that you’re passionate about that is distinct from your hobbies.

CONCLUSION

The bottom line here is that nobody should ever have to suffer in their job.

You shouldn’t work somewhere you don’t like, especially in today’s economy and the vibrant and eclectic world that we live in.

There is a way for everyone to make money in a way that is in line with their values and goals.

Don’t be a victim!

If you don’t like where you are, stop complaining and start doing something about it. If you’re not going to do something about it, you don’t get to complain – sorry!

Put in the work and you will live a more fulfilled life than if you spend the vast majority working somewhere that you don’t like.

Get out there, have your life be great, and have a great career! 

You owe it to yourself to have your job and your career be great!


Check out this article on how to find and do what you love: https://muse.cm/2ee8e5Y