How To Write An Account Director Job Description

Many of the strategies and tactics when it comes to writing a job description are similar, so you may see some of this content in other blogs. In other words, the structure on how to write a job description, and some of the strategy about what kind of content, and the ways in which to formulate the job description tend to remain fairly constant across different positions.

The first key is there’s always two sections of the job description. The main part is the actual job description itself, and the position requirements. The position description, and the position requirements are two critical aspects of the job description that if done incorrectly can be very detrimental to you finding the right candidate.

FOUR SECTIONS TO A JOB DESCRIPTION

As a reminder, a job description should consist of four primary sections. The first should be an overview of your company, who you are, what you do, what’s unique about you, and what’s unique about working for you. You can also include here some of the cultural aspects of your company that are going to be relevant, and interesting for someone looking at this job. The last section should always be some final details about compensation, perks, benefits, and things of that like.

The two sections in the middle in no particular order should always be the position requirements, and the position description. The position description is an actual description of what the day to day duties and functions of the job are going to be. The position requirements are the skills and background that the ideal candidate will have, bringing to this position.

Having these four sections distinct is going to be critical, and having this be consistent across jobs for your organization is very important as well. For an account director, the position requirements in the position description needs to be laid out in a very specific way. The title account director can mean a lot of different things in a lot of different organizations. Typically, an account director is seen in the agency world, whether that be a media agency, an advertising agency, a marketing company, a PR firm, or something of that like.

DEFINING YOUR ACCOUNT DIRECTOR ROLE

But, account directors can also be related to sales positions in different organizations. They can also be related to customer and client service and a variety of different things. Some people with account titles are more involved in strategy and relationship building, some are more involved in campaign development, some are more involved in sales, some are more involved in tactical execution, and so on, and so forth.

So, with a title like account director, it’s going to be very important to have a job description that actually clearly spells out the requirements and description of the role. Only by being clear and succinct will you be sure that you’re targeting the right kind of talent. Some of the things you’ll want to consider are: what is the day to day function of this role? Is this account direct … Is your account director role more of a relationship role, or is it more of a strategy role, or is it more of a tactical role, or something else?

Be sure that you, or someone on your team really spells out what the day to day functions of this role are going to be. Also think about things like management responsibility, budget responsibility, people responsibility, etc. You want to be sure that you think of all the different functions, and assets of what this job are going to be. When it comes to writing the qualifications for the role, you want to think very hard about what is a must have, and what is a nice to have.

MUST HAVES VS NICE-TO-HAVES

I always recommend that the position qualification section has a must have and nice to have so that you can be clear to perspective candidates about what is critical, and what would be nice. You have to be realistic about what you’re looking for in a candidate. No one is ever going to check all the boxes that you need, so it’s critical that you understand for yourself what you can and can’t have. Must haves will likely include things like management responsibility, budget responsibility, financial responsibility, sometimes P&L responsibility, and things of this nature.

Get clear about what this person needs to have when they come in on day one. Oftentimes, account directors are very involved with clients and client relationship, so this may be another must have. Nice to haves might be things like certain types of client industry experience, or vertical experience. Maybe working with a particular type of product, or a particular type of marketing channel. A particular type of marketing channel or marketing channels could also be a must have depending on exactly what this role is.

Once you flesh out the requirements, the must haves, and the nice to haves, you’ll have a nice part of this section complete. Doing the work to get the actual job description and the position requirements together is going to get you the bulk of the job description. The first and last section should be fairly consistent from position to position.

CONCLUSION

Be sure that your job description is succinct, but goes into enough detail to give candidates a clear picture about what the day to day would look like, and also what is required for the right candidates to be applying for the position. Be realistic about must haves and nice to haves.

We recommend using a job description as a sort of checklist when you’re interviewing candidates. You can use it as a rubric to make sure you’re asking the right kind of interview questions to candidates, and that they are checking the boxes of the things that you need. This is a great way to be organized and to ensure that you’re hiring the right talent. For other interview tips check out our other blog posts.


Looking for more great interview questions to add to your list? Here are some great ideas! https://muse.cm/1hLMaHT


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